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Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland and Catholic Scouts of Ireland.


All Sections

Association Membership Badge

(Rawley Scout Badge)

Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. Association Badge. The badge was worn, centred, on the left pocket of the uniform shirt. It was always referred to as the Rawley Badge up until the 1980s and is also referred to as the C.B.S.I. membership badge.


Felt un-bound membership badge, measures 37mm by 40mm. Used from the 1930s up to the 1950s or early 1960s, there was several different versions of manufacture, a bordered version and un-bordered, the un-bordered version tested the Scouts sewing skills as it was necessary to closely stitch all-round the badge when attaching it to the uniform as it tended to disintegrate after a few washes. The red cross shade tended to remain consistent the shamrock shade did vary considerable ranging from gold to pale yellow.

There are a large variety of colour shades.


Measures 70mm across. Commonly known as the blazer or activity jacket badge it was used for a verity of different things over the years, the first Beaver colonies used it as a membership badge.


Catholic Scouts of Ireland Name Strip
Name strips for the Catholic Scouts of Ireland, the Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland admitted girls to the Venture Scouts in 1983 and became the Catholic Scouts of Ireland dropping the Boy from rules and references. There were various styles of name strip used, listed below, oldest first. The name strip was worn above the right uniform pocket.





















Gaelic Speakers Badge


The Irish Speakers badge was worn centred on the right pocket of the uniform shirt. Although the Gaelic Speakers Badge could be worn be all sections including Leaders it was most commonly see on the Boy Scout uniform.

Suaitheantas Spéisíalta na Gaeilge.

Bronntar an suaitheantas se oar Ghasóga dílsithe atá idir 11 agus 18 mbliana déag d’aois mar chomhartha líofacht Gaeilge. Tá sé ar fáil do roinn na Sínsear agus roinn na Sóisear.




Gaelic speakers badge worn by all sections, the badge was worn on the uniform indicating that the wearer could speak Gaelic. The design is a stylised G for Gaelic. The were various shapes and different styles of G produced. Some designs produced are very similar the Irish Military badges worn by Gaelic speaking soldiers, the military badges tend to have red backgrounds.   To be awarded the badge the Scout had to show a fluency in Gaelic.


Beaver Scouts

Beaver Scout membership badge
Officially known as the Footprint Trail the badges were more commonly known as Paw Prints.


There were 8 different coloured paws.
Beaver Scout Slumber Night Badge. Measures 60mm by 40mm. Used by Scouting Ireland CSI and Scouting Ireland up to about 2010. Awarded to a Beaver Scout for their first overnight event.


Beaver Scout First Year Award. Measures 60mm by 40mm. Used by Scouting Ireland CSI and Scouting Ireland up to about 2010. Awarded to a Beaver Scout after their first year.

The First Year Award and the Slumber Night badge were designed to be worn above and below the Beaver Footprint Trail badges. There were a total of eight footprint badges arranged in two diamonds with the Slumber Night badge at the bottom of the lower diamond and the first year badge above the upper diamond.


Cub Scouts

Although not common today old publications referring to Irish Cub Scouts will often use the following Gaelic or Irish language terms:


  • Macaomh refers to Cub Scout, the literal meaning is young person, youth or boy. The plural is Macaoimh.


  • Gasra is group, when used in referring to Cub Scouts usually refers to the Scout Group they belong to. The literal meaning is group of worriers from the legend of Fin MacCumhail (Finn Mac Cool) and the Fianna.


  • Macaoimh Sóisear, Sóisear means junior and in CBSI terms refers to a Seconder. Badge, single white stripe on a yellow background worn on the left sleeve the top of the badge five inches from the shoulder seam.  


  • Macaoimh Ceann Seisir, translates as head of six people, Ceann is head and Seisir is Irish for six people.  Badge, tow white stripes on yellow background positioned as with Seconder.


  • Macaoimh Seisear, Seisear is a variant of Seisir, in Scouting terms refers to a Senior Sixer. Badge, three white stripes on a yellow background positioned as Seconder and Sixer.


  • When the Fiannaíocht (Tales) System was introduced a more symbolic translation was used for Irish speaking Cub Packs. A sixer was a Rí, Rí is Gaelic for Chief, a Seconder was known as Aire, Aire is Gaelic for minister and comes from the old Irish Clan system where the Clan Chief’s adviser was known as a Minister.



Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. Cub Scout badge, worn on the cap when Cub Scouts wore caps.
Fiannaíocht (Tales) System
In 2002 the Catholic Scouts of Ireland introduced a scheme on Six Name badges for Gaelic Speaking Cub Packs. Eight badges depicting aspects of Irish Mythology were produced, some badges had several names in order to increase the amount of available names for Sixes. The scheme remained in use up to 2010, with the introduction of the One Programme it was decided that all Cub Packs should be bi-lingual. Non Irish speaking Cub Packs used a similar animal and bird name scheme for Six names as used by Scout Troops.

As part of the Fiannaíocht Scheme Sixes were known as Clans and Sixers were known as Rí, Rí is Gaelic for Chief. The badge was used from about 2004 up to 2010. The badge measures 55mm by 50mm.
Under the Fiannaíocht Scheme a Seconder was known as Aire, Aire is Gaelic for minister and comes from the old Irish Clan system where the Clan Chief’s adviser was known as a Minister. The badge measures 65mmby 20mm.

A series of eight different clan names badges were produced for the Fiannaíocht Scheme. Some of the badge had more than one name, Chúcullainn Clan badge was also used for as the Setanta Clan (Chúcullainn’s name before he killed the hound).


This badge was for Chúcullainn Clan, this badge was also known as Setanta (Chúcullainn’s name before he killed the hound). The badge measures 40mm across.
This badge was for the Brian Boru Clan and was also used for Brian Clan or Boru Clan. The badge measures 40mm across.


This badge was for Naomh Padraig Clan, Naomh Padraig is Gaelic for Saint Patrick. The badge measures 40mm across.
This badge was for Maeve and Gráinne Clans and relates to the story of Gráinne Ní Mháile better known as Grace O’Malley the pirate queen of Galway. The badge measures 40mm across.


This badge was for Round Tower clan. The badge measures 40mm across.
This badge was for An Talún Órga (The Golden land). An Talún Órga is an Irish legend with lost gold and the contest between 2 brother to become king. The badge measures 40mm across.


Conor MacNessa or Cormac MacAirt, the legend is a bit long and complicated, if you google either name you will find the story.
Diarmuid or Ferdia, the legend is a bit long and complicated, if you google either name you will find the story.


Scouts

The Scout Uniform

Uniform Shirt Colour

From the 1st of January 1965 the official C.B.S.I. uniform shirt colour was according the U Book

Rule U7: Scouts

Shirt, Official pattern. This may at the discretion of the Diocese, be in Navy Blue or Grey. Long sleeved shirts are to be worn with rolled up sleeves unless otherwise permitted. In 1978 the colour changed to light blue.



The uniform as depicted in Come Scouting published by the C.B.S.I. in 1960. The Scout is wearing the The black Glengarry, Bonnet or Caubeen. The C.B.S.I. Association badge is referred to as the Rawley Badge, as you can see from the image below by 1979 it was referred to as the Association Badge.

In 1978 the uniform changed to the light blue shirt and navy blue trousers. As can be seen in the illustration above from the 1979 edition of the Scouting Trail the Bi Ullamh Scroll was no longer worn under the C.B.S.I. Cross. The black Glengarry, Bonnet or Caubeen (it was called many things over the years) was replaced with the United Nations type blue Beret. 

Up to 1964 all Scouters including adult Leaders wore short trousers, this changed in 1964 when Adult Leaders and older Scouts could wear long trousers.


Scouts Metal Hat and Beret Badges
The metal badge was worn on the wide brimmed hat and the beret by Scouts and all leader ranks. I am not sure when the badge was introduced but it can be see worn in photos dating from the 1930s. I think the official date for the removal of the badge from the Scout uniform was in 1987 although photos taken after this year show Scouts wearing the badge.

The C.B.S.I. periodically published a book called The U Book detailing the current Uniform and badges to be worn by all sections. The 1965 edition gives the description of the metal cap badge worn by Scouts as:

  • Rawley and Second Class Scouts wear in the beret, directly over the left eye, a plain brass metal badge of the cross with shamrock superimposed.

  • First Class Scouts, in addition to the badge above wear under the badge a plain brass scroll bearing the words Bi Ullamh.

  • Knights (Venture Scouts) wear in the beret over the left eye a silver shamrock and cross together with a silver scroll bearing the letters R G on a bar.

The badge was worn on the wide brimmed hat and the Beret. It measures approximately 35mm by 35mm. 

The meaning of the C.B.S.I. Cross is described in the 1964 edition of The Scouting Trail as:

The Cross reminds you of your Holy Faith which is the most important thing in your life.

The Shamrock reminds you of:

  • The Most Holy Trinity.

  • The three Scout Principals, especially the second.

  • The three parts of the Scout Promise.

The Shamrock resting on the Cross shows that true love of country is based on love of God, and never goes against the teachings of religion.

 

The three Scout Principals of the C.B.S.I.

  • A Scout is true to Christ his King, honours our Blessed Lady as the Mother of God, and is proud to be a Catholic.

  • A Scout loves his country.

  • The duty of a Scout begins in his home.



   
                       
                                                   


Around the time of the introduction of the new uniform in 1978 the cap badge was changed to chrome plated and the chrome scroll only appears to have been worn by Assistant Leaders. In C.B.S.I. uniform related publications chrome is referred to as silver.

Second Class Scout
Catholic Boys Scouts of Ireland. C.B.S.I. Second Class Scout Badge.



First Class Scout


First Class Scout Catholic Boys Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. In order to receive a First Class Scout badge a Scout had to complete a series of tests as detailed in The Official Scout Handbook The Scouting Trail. The number of tests a Scout needed to complete varied over the years, according to the 1964 edition a Scout had to pass 39 tests. The First Class Scout badge is worn on the left sleeve of the shirt so that the center of the badge is four inches from the shoulder seam.
The design of the badge remained the same although there are a wide variety of shades of colours on the cross, legend and stitching. Where the badge was produced on a rectangular piece an outline of yellow or gold was used to form an oval.



Excelsior Scout Badge

The Excelsior Scout Badge is awarded to the First Class Scout who has qualified for any five Merit badges, and shows a satisfactory service as a First-class Scout for a period of at least three months.


The above description is from the CBSI Organisation and Rules book from the 1940s, by 1965 references to the Excelsior Scout no longer appear so must have been dropped. The badges was ranked below Star Scout.


Star Scout
Measures 60mm across. The Star badge is probably the longest running badge issued by the C.B.S.I., if was first introduced in 1930 and was used in various designs up to 2004. The text on the badge reads Ar Son Na hEireann which translates as For Ireland.  I am told that the Ar Son Na hEireann version was first issued in 1938 when, with the introduction of the Irish Constitution, the name of the Country changed from The Irish Free State to Ireland.  The badge is made of felt with a black felt backing.


Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. Star Scout Badge. Worn on the left sleeve of the uniform shirt. In order to be awarded the Star Scout badge a Scout had to show a satisfactory record of service as a First Class Scout for at least 6 months and earned at least 10 merit badges, at least one from each Merit Badge Section (see merit badges). The Star Scout Badge would replace the First Class Scout Badge on the uniform, the 2 badges would not be worn at the same time.




National Scout
National Scout Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. To qualify for a National Scout badge the Scout had to have shown satisfactory service as a First Class Scout for at least one year and have earned 18 merit badges with a minimum of two badges from each section of the merit badge list (see merit badge link on the left). The National Scout Badge replaced the Star or First Class Scout badge on the uniform.

C.B.S.I Belt Buckle 

The brass Gasóga Catoilicí na hÉireann belt buckle was used up to about 1983 when the Boy was dropped from the name.


The replacement for the brass C.B.S.I. buckle was a chromed version. The centre piece was the C.S.I. Cross and the receiving end was plain with Official Scout Pattern engraved on the back, this was identical to the receiving end used by the S.A.I.


Scouting Ireland


Current issue (2014) Scouting Ireland belt buckle


Pioneer Total Abstinence Society

The badge of the Pioneer Total Abstinence Society was often seen on the Scout Uniform, this badge was worn on the flap of the left uniform shirt pocket. Although not a Scout badge Scouts were expected to be a member and all Catholic children would take The Pledge as it was known when they were confirmed into the Catholic Church, The Pledge was to promise to abstain from alcohol until a certain age, the age reduced over the years, when I was confirmed it was 21 years old. 


The Scout Badge

The first in a series of four badges in the Scout Challenge scheme. This badge was awarded to the Scout when invested. The requirements for the badge are below the image of the badge. As far as I know the Scout Challenge scheme was introduced in the late 1960s or early 1970s when the First and Second Class Scout badges were retired I think the Challenge scheme remained in use up to the mid-1990s. The badge 80mm by 54mm.





Scout Skills Award

The Scout Skills Award was the second badge in the Scout Challenge. The Scout had to complete eleven challenges in order to gain the badge:
  • Camp Craft. Packing you kit, erecting a tent, good tent maintenance, camp duties, striking camp and spend at least four nights under canvas.
  • Camping Skills. Demonstrate an ability to tie various knots, make a useful camp gadget, safely carry various camp tools, and construct a wood pile.
  • Cooking. Build and alter fire and out a sod and make a trench fire or camp oven, cook a meal for two of meat and  two veg on an open fire, know how to use a gas pressure stove and lamp and know how to store food and water and dispose of waste.
  • Knowledge of Scouting. Know the history of Scouting worldwide and in Ireland.
  • Our Country. Know the National Anthem, know how the fly the flags of other nations and make an Irish heritage wallchart depicting more than one of the following, history, craft, music, culture, costume, folklore.
  • Pathfinding. Know the country code, hiked at least 50Km over a six month period with your Patrol, know how to read a map, know at least three methods of finding North without a compass, knowledge of first aid, know how to follow compass bearings and cook a meal backwoods style.
  • Duty to God.
  • First Aid.
  • Family Living. Tests designed to help the Scout appreciate their parents and family.
  • Observation and Estimation. Follow tracking signs for more than 400 meters, find the dimensions of three objects without the use of conventional measuring instruments, and take part in at least two observational Kim’s Games.
  • Promise and Law. Living up to the Scout Law and Promise.

Senior Scout Award

In order to gain the Senior Scout Award as Scout had to complete nine challenges:
  • Physical and Water Activities. Swim 50 meters and float for 3 minutes, water safety, know what to do if someone is drowning, various physical activities including running jumping and paddling a canoe. Know the effects of tobacco and drugs on your health. The importance of personal hygiene.
  • Skills and Crafts. The Scout was given a choice of various activities relating hobbies and crafts, technology and pioneering. Communications, the Scout had to send a message in Morse code or semaphore, make a poster of handbill advertising a Scout event and give a five minute talk to the Troop.
  • Exploring. Find a new hike route for the Patrol or Troop, visit a new place of interest and discuss your visit with your Scout leader, undertake a conservation project, take part in an orienteering exercise and make a map of your local area.
  • Duty to God. A religious part of the badge in which the Scout has to explore various aspects of their religion, interestingly in one part of the requirements for the badge a Scout has to prepare a Scouts Own, considering the Catholic Churches attitude to religious ceremonies conducted without a Priest.
  • Expedition. The Scout had to arrange an expedition, with at least one nights camping, on foot or by canoe.
  • Community Service. Know how to give directions to various local landmarks and complete at least three hours voluntary service in the community.
  • Camping.  Organise a two day camp including a three course meal cook on an open fire, a menu including choices should be provided for the meal. The Scout also had to plan all the activities for the two days. In order to complete the camping part of the Challenge the Scout had to have spent at least ten nights under canvas.
  • Emergencies. First aid and how to handle an emergency situation.
  • Scout Law. The Scout had to show an understanding of the Scout Law and instruct a Scout working for their Scout Badge Award.

Leadership Award

The Leadership Award was designed for the older Scout to take an active role in leading both his Patrol and Troop activities. A Scout had to be at least thirteen years old to start work on the badge. The badge work was undertaken under three heading, Leadership, Communications and Training.


Air Scouts
Catholic Scouts of Ireland C.S.I. Membership Air Scouts Badge.


CBSI Crew Skills. The requirements for the badge were the same as Air Crew Skills, I think the Air was added to the name of the newer version of the badge.
CBSI Air Crew Skills, the older version was unbound.




Master Air Scout Badge
 Measures 100mm by 30mm. The first C.B.S.I. Air Scout Troop was formed in Mayo in 1981, Air Scouts had to be at least 15 years old have 20/20 vision, spectacles were allowed, Scouts who were colour blind could not join. Awarded to an Air Scout after he had completed a series of tasks one of which was to fly a glider for half an hour.


Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland Senior Air Scout Badge.


CBSI Parachutist.

Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland Air Scouts blazer badge. Describer is most places as a blazer badge I have seen this badge worn on a Bomber Jacket type uniform worn by Air Scouts but as there are not many Air Scout groups in Ireland I do not know if this was official uniform.

The first Irish Air Scout Squadron was formed in 1934. The Irish Independent announced the formation of the new Squadron on the 19th of November 1934, it was known as the Free State Air Scouts’ Squadron and was formed under the Saorstát Aviation Club (Saorstát in Irish for Free State). The first lecture was held at the Knox Hall in Monkstown County Dublin. The group was called the 1st City of Dublin (Ormond Quay) Air Scouts.


Sea Scouts

Sea Scouts Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. First Class Scout badge. First Class Scouts in the Sea Scouts wore a different colour badge to the First Class Scout in the Scouts. Different shades of cross, shamrock and scroll were produced.

Sea Scouts, Catholic Scouts of Ireland C.S.I. water activities badge, this badge was produced in a flat and rounded end.

Venture Scouts
Knight Errant Clans


The official Venture Scout uniform as announced in 1981.
Venture Scout section badge Catholic Scouts of Ireland C.S.I. Up until 1971 Venture Scouts were known as Knight Errant Clans.


Scouters (Leaders)

Metal Hat Badges

The above table is from the C.B.S.I. Scout Leader magazine from September 1980 and contains the colours of metal cap badge worn by leaders and officers holders of the C.B.S.I.

Arm Badges

The above table is from the U Book and the badges came into effect on the 1st of January 1965.

  • K/C = Knight Chief (Knight Errant Clan Leader)
  • A/K/C = Assistant Knight Chief (Assistant Knight Clan Errant Leader)
  • D/S/M = Diocesan (District) Scout Master
  • U/L = Unit Leader
  • M/M = Macaoimh Master or Mistress (Cub Scout Leader)
  • A/M/M = Assistant Macaoimh Master or Mistress (Assistant Cub Scout Leader)
  • S/M = Scout Master
  • A/S/M = Assistant Scout Master



Section Leader


Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I.  Section Leaders cap badge, red enamel cross with green enamelled shamrock center. A two part badge the Bí Ullaimh (Be Prepared) part worn under the cross.


The colour scheme of the Leaders beret badges remained the same when the metal changed from Brass to Chrome, you can see the Brass rim around the cross.




Assistant Leader
The Assistant Leader’s metal cap badge was described as a silver cross with green shamrock and ordinary scroll. The design is very similar to the Assistant Scout Master from the 1960s apart from the lettering in the metal scroll is chrome rather then green.



Assistant Leader cloth badge from the 1970s and 1980s

Assistant Leader cloth badge from the 1980s and 1990s


Assistant Scout Master
         
Assistant Scout Masters Cloth Badge 1960 – 1970s. The official description of the Scout Master’s badge from the Scouting Trail.

The background of the badge was Green, the badge came in a variety of sizes and shades. I have seen the green backing range from almost black to light green.

Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland Scout Master A.S.M. badge worn on the left sleeve of the uniform shirt one and a half inches from the shoulder seam. Badge of A.S.M. in yellow letters with red background. Badge also worn on the uniform coat. The badge appears in the 1940s edition of the CBSI Organisation and Rules publications but not in the 1965 U Book so I would assume it was discontinued sometime before 1965.

Scout Master
   
                                         
Scout Masters Cloth Badge 1960s – 1970s. The official description of the Scout Master’s badge from the Scouting Trail.  

Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland Scout Master S.M. badge worn on the left sleeve of the uniform shirt one and a half inches from the shoulder seam. Badge of S.M. in yellow letters with red background. Badge also worn on the uniform coat. The badge appears in the 1940s edition of the CBSI Organisation and Rules publications but not in the 1965 U Book so I would assume it was discontinued sometime before 1965.

Unit Leader
Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland C.B.S.I. Unit Leaders cap badge chrome cross with blue enamel and green enamelled shamrock in the center.  The cross measures 36mm across and the Bí Ullamh (Be Prepared) badge measures 29 mm long.



Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland and Catholic Scouts of Ireland unit leader’s cloth patch. The cloth patch had the same colour scheme as the metal cap badge, blue cross green shamrock. The shield shaped badge was used from the 1980s up to the 1990s

Unit Leader used between 1965 and about 1980, described in the U Book as a Grey background it looks more like silver on the actual badge. This badge measures 85mm by 55mm but they did come in slightly smaller and larger sizes.  







Assistant Unit Leader

The round version used in the 1970 and into the 1980 had a white cross and scroll backing.

The shield version used in the 1980 and 1990 had a blue cross with only the backing of the scroll in white.



Venture Scout Leader

The round design badge was introduced in the 1970s and used up to the 1980s.


Assistant Venture Scout Leader


Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland Assistant Venture Scout Leader. The round design badge was introduced in the 1970s and used up to the 1980s.


Cub Leader

The round design badge was introduced in the 1970s and used up to the 1980s.


Assistant Cub Leader

The round design badge was introduced in the 1970s and used up to the 1980s.



Diocesan Scout Master D.S.M.

Diocesan Scout Master D.S.M. The C.B.S.I. was divided into Diocese, each Scout Group or Unit within a Diocese would have one D.S.M. The D.S.M. was a higher rank than Unit Leader or Scout Master. The background colour is described as brown in the U Book but on the badge it appears more of a gold colour.




National Officer

C.B.S.I. National Officer. Badge used in the 1970s and 1980s. National Officers liaised with Regional Commissioners and other officers on national issues.


National Director

C.B.S.I. National Director. Badges used in the 1970s and 1980s.




Regional Commissioner
                        
Catholic Scouts of Ireland C.S.I. Regional Commissioner the cloth badge left above worn on the uniform, the metal badge above right worn on the beret when the beret was part of the uniform.

The shield shaped badge was used from the 1980s up to the 1990s.

Assistant Regional Commissioner

Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland used in the 1970s and 1980s.

Assistant Field Commissioner
Catholic Boys Scouts of Ireland Assistant Field Commissioner metal cap badge.