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Fingal Volunteers  

 

The following is a list of Volunteers who were involved in the fighting as Ashbourne County Meath. There is more information on the Battle of Ashbourne on the Rebellion in other areas page link on the left.


Commandant Thomas Ashe


Aungier Richard. Lusk Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 25th of October 1884 died on the 25th of March 1962, aged 31 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Knocksiddane, Finglas, RIC Barracks, Swords, RIC Barracks, Donabate, RIC Barracks, Garristown, Baldwinstown, Burnstown, RIC Barracks, Ashbourne and Newbarn, Kilsallaghan areas. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was taken prisoner in Newbarn on the Sunday after the Battle of Ashburn and interned in Frongoch until Christmas Eve 1916. He served with the I.R.A. throughout the War of Independence, he did not take part in the Civil War.


Birney Patrick. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1894 died on the 4th of October 1970, aged about 22 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Ashbourne County Meath. He was not arrested or detained after the Rising. He served throughout the War of Independence and joined the National Army on the 22nd of June 1922 and served until discharged on the 7th of March 1924.


Blanchfield Peadar. (Peter). Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 8th of February 1976, aged about 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at North Circular Road, Cabrd Road Bridge, O’Connell Street, Finglas, Knocksedan, Garristown and Ashbourne. Worked as a Cabinet maker at Anderson, Stanford and Ridgeway, he left his employment about 3 weeks before the Rising to work fulltime on Volunteers activities. He was a member of the I.R.B. and joined the Volunteers at their inception in 1913 and took part in the Howth gun running. He was detained after the surrender and deported first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released in December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers and served throughout the War of Independence. He did not take part in the Civil War. Brother of Thomas Blanchfield below.


Blanchfield Thomas. “B” Company, 1stBattalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 4th of October 1955, aged about 28years old during the Rising. Employed as a boot maker at the time of the Rising. Served in the Free State Army, Dublin Guard, number 8872. Retired from the Defence Forces in 1950. Brother of Peadar Blanchfield above.


Brogan Patrick . Lusk Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 14th of December 1967, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Ashbourne, Swords and Donabate areas. He joined the Lusk Company at the formation of the Volunteers in 1913 and was appointed Lieutenant, the Company numbered about 60 men, about half turn out at Easter Week. After the surrender at Newbarn on the Sunday he was interned in Frongoch, he was released on Christmas Eve 1916. He re-joined the Lusk Company after release from Frongoch and served until the end of the War of Independence.



Connor James. St Margaret’s Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal) Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 7th of July 1955 aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Finglas, Garristown, Newbarn, Kilsallaghan and R.I.C. Barracks Ashbourne County Meath areas. He was at the camp at Newbarn on the Saturday after the Battle of Ashbourne when Thomas Ashe told him to go home to avoid capture. He was arrested on the following Wednesday when he was held at Trinity Collage and Santry Barracks for two weeks, he was released but arrested again that evening when he was deported to Wakefield and then to Frongoch where he was interned until Christmas Eve 1916. He re-joined the Company on release and served up to the end of the War of Independence, he did not take part in the Civil War.



Crenigan John, known as Jack, aged 21. Killed in Action. Was employed by the Dublin Tram Company.


Devine John. Lusk Company, 5th Battalion, Fingal Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 3rd of March 1968, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Fingal, Ashbourne, Swords and Donabate areas. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was taken prisoner at the surrender at Newbarn on the Sunday and interned in Frongoch up to a few days before Christmas 1916. He re-joined the Luck Company on his release from Frongoch and was appointed Captain by General Mulcahy in 1918. In December 1920 while on the run he was arrested while eating a meal at his home, he was detained in Collinstown and Arbour Hill, he was released in January 1921. He secured employment in Saint Vincent’s Hospital Dublin but was arrested again in February and detained until December 1921. He took no part in the Civil War.


Daly Francis (Frank). Munitions Unit, General Headquarters, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1887died on the 1 of January 1976, aged about 29 years old during the Rising. Area of Railway lines between Liffey Junction and Ashtown, Church Street, Area of Four Courts, King's Inns Quay, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Ashbourne, County Meath areas. Prior to the Easter Rising Frank Daly served as an Irish Volunteers General Headquarters Officer in charge of the manufacture of munitions at "Cluny House" in Clontarf, County Dublin, he was the Director of Munitions at this time. He took part in the Howth Gun Running and was on board the fishing boat "Nugget" rendezvousing with and directing the "Chotah" into Kilcoole, County Wexford in 1914. In 1915 he was involved in a raid on a National Volunteers arms depot on the North Wall in Dublin. During the Easter Rising as well as taking part in fighting against RIC/British forces at Ashbourne, Daly undertook attacks on the rail and communications system in the North Dublin area and was in charge of erecting and inspecting barricades in the Four Courts and Church Street areas. Following his arrest in May 1916 Daly was interned until December 1916. From 1917 onwards, as well as serving as a Company Commanding Officer he provided training and instruction for the Irish Volunteers, Fianna Éireann and Cumann na mBan, undertook election and intelligence work and was involved in the seizing, purchasing and transportation of arms. In December 1919 he also he took part in the raid on the offices of the "Irish Independent" newspaper. During 1920 and 1921 Frank Daly took part in a number of IRA operations and attacks on British forces and targets in Dublin. These included: surveillance of suspected spies; attacks on British forces at Blackquire Bridge in August 1920, Capel Street 1920, Ryders Row 1921, Blessington Street in January 1921, Findlater's Place in April 1921 and Ormond Quay in June 1921.  He was also involved in the capture and killing of an alleged British spy named Byrne in May 1921. In May 1921 Daly was taken off the attack on the Customs House to assist in the erection of a printing press for the "An t-Óglach" newspaper. During March and April 1922 Frank Daly took part in the occupation of Fowler Hall and the Four Courts by anti-Treaty forces as well as the smashing of the "Freeman's Journal" printing presses. At the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 Daly took part in fighting against National Army forces at Fowler Hall, Barry's Hotel and the Hamman Hotel. He was captured on 18 July 1922 and interned until December 1923. He then re-joined the IRA but resigned in April 1924.


Doyle Patrick. (Paddy) Lusk Company, Fingal Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 15th of August 1893 died on the 7th of January 1968, aged 22 years old during the Rising. Fought at the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords, Donabate and Ashbourne. Interned after the Rising until December 1916. He served with the I.R.A. throughout the War of Independence and with the National Army during the Civil War. He was arrested and interned between December 1920 and February 1921. During the War of Independence Doyle participated in a number of IRA operations against British forces including attacks on Rush RIC Barracks, Rogerstown Coast Guard Station and Lusk Remount Depot. Patrick Doyle joined the National Army in February 1922 and was discharged from the Defence Forces time expired in November 1923.


Doyle Thomas. Volunteer, Lusk Company, 5th (Fingal) Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 22nd of July 1957, aged about 19years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Ashbourne County Meath and the R.I.C. Barracks in Swords County Dublin. He joined the Volunteers in 1914 and was involved in the Howth Gun-Running on the 26th of July 1914 and joined the I.R.B. in July 1917. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War joining the National Army on the 15th of February 1922 and serving with the Defence Forces up to February 1945.  


Doyle William. Volunteer, 5th Battalion, Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 18th of December 1891 died on the 19th of January 1972, aged 24years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Knocksedan and Finglas in Dublin and Ashbourne in County Meath. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He surrendered on the Sunday at Newbarn and after being taken to Richmond arracks in Dublin he was deported, he was released from Frongoch on the 23rd of December 1916. He resumed Volunteer activities after release and served throughout the War of Independence taking part in raids for arms, an attack on Rush Barracks in 1920 and guarding prisoners. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Richard Duke. Aged about 25 years old during the Rising, spoke Irish. His brother Thomas Patrick also took part in the Rising at Ashbourne. He was one of 203 prisoners taken from Richmond Barracks Dublin to Stafford Detention Barracks UK on the 8th of May 1916.


Duke Thomas Patrick. St. Margaret’s Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 9th of May 1956, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Rathbeale Cross, Finglas, Blanchardstown, Swords, RIC Barracks, Swords, Donabate, Kilsologhan, Garristown, RIC Barracks, Garristown, Baldwinstown areas. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until August 1916. He was appointed as Officer Commanding of the company. During the War of Independence he was on outpost duty during the burning of Finglas Barracks, guarding prisoners, cutting telegraph wires and blocking roads. He was involved in making buckshot and raids for arms. He was arrested in April 1921 and interned until December that year. At the outbreak of the Civil War he formed an Active Service Unit, Flying Column, he was captured in the Ward House in July 1922 and interned until December 1923. He was an Irish speaker. He was one of 203 prisoners taken from Richmond Barracks Dublin to Stafford Detention Barracks UK on the 8th of May 1916.


Fleming Michael. “C” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 1st of July 1965, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought at the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords, Donabate, Garristown and Ashbourne. He was one of 308 prisoners removed from Richmond Barracks on the 2nd of May and detained in Knutsford Barracks UK on the 3rd of May. He joined the Irish Volunteers in 1914. Prior to the 1916 Easter Rising Fleming had personally paid for and bought a quantity of arms from the Ancient Order of Hibernians for Irish Volunteer use. In the days immediately preceding the Rising he was involved in the distribution of arms stored at his home in County Wicklow, his brother John’s business premises in Drumcondra and other locations for use in the Rising as well as the manufacture of munitions. On Sunday 23rd  April 1916 he carried written and verbal despatches between Ginger O' Connell and Eoin MacNeill and named participants at a GAA convention in Dublin City Hall as well as accompanying the GAA members to meetings with MacNeill and Pearse, James Connolly and Thomas McDonagh at Liberty Hall, Dublin and with Thomas Clarke at Fairview, Dublin. Mobilised on Monday 24 April Michael Fleming went to the post at Saint Stephen's Green before joining the units active in north County Dublin and County Meath for the remainder of the week. Following the surrender Fleming was interned until December 1916. Following his release Michael Fleming resumed his activities and was again involved in the purchasing of arms as well as serving on armed guards on Irish Volunteer conventions at Croke Park and the Mansion House, Dublin in 1917 and 1918. During the War of Independence Fleming took part in IRA armed street patrols prior to his arrest by British forces during a raid on his brother's house in October 1920. Released on 23 May 1921 he was captured on 25 May while taking part in the IRA attack on the Custom House in Dublin and held until December 1921. At the outbreak of the Civil War on 28 June 1922 Michael Fleming took part in fighting against National Army forces in the O'Connell Street and Parnell Street areas for about a week. Although his home was raided during the Civil War he was not arrested or interned during that conflict.


Golden Jeremiah. (Jerry, AKA James Barry). “B” Company, 1st battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 9th of December 1964, aged about 30 years old during the Rising. Fought in the North Circular Road Bridge, Cabra Road Bridge, Knocksedan Bridge, North County Dublin, RIC Barracks, Garristown, County Dublin, RIC Barracks, Ashbourne, County Meath and the Baldwinstown areas. Jerry Golden successfully evaded capture following his involvement in the 1916 Easter Rising. During the War of Independence he served as an IRA Company Officer Commanding. He was responsible for suggesting and assisted in planning of IRA raid for arms at the Registry of Deed, Kings Inns, Dublin in June 1920, according to Golden and reference from George Fitzgerald, Golden was in charge of a picket of law clerks on strike outside the building at the time, was ordered not to take part in the actual raid and was taken prisoner and placed along with British soldiers also taken prisoner during the raid to remove suspicion from him. In January 1921 Jerry Golden was arrested under the name of James Barry and sentenced to five years penal servitude. He was released in January 1922 and re-joined the IRA. In April 1922 he was appointed Officer Commanding of the Guard of the anti-Treaty IRA post at Fowler Hall, Dublin. On 28 June 1922 he was part of the IRA force that occupied Hughes Hotel and adjoining buildings on Lower Gardiner Street and Talbot Street and took part in fighting there against National Army forces at the outbreak of the Civil War. He was captured by Government forces on the 2nd of July 1922 and subsequently interned until January 1924.


Grant Patrick. (Paddy). “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 28th of September 1980, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Finglas, Swords, Donabate, Garristown and Ashbourne areas. He was employed as a motor mechanic at the time of the Rising. He was one of 308 prisoners removed from Richmond Barracks Dublin on the 2nd of May and deported to Knutsford Detention Barracks arriving there on the 3rd of May. He was released from detention in December 1916. He took no part in the War of Independence or Civil War.


Richard Hayes

Hayes Dr Richard medical officer. Commandant 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1878 died on the 16th of June 1958, aged about 38 years old during the Rising. Fought at the R.I.C. Barracks at Donabate, Swords, Garristown and Ashbourne. He had been the Officer Commanding resigned in favour of Ashe. Became a TD (Teachta Dála Member of the Irish Parliament). Appointed Battalion Officer Commanding of 5th Fingal Battalion, Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers in June 1915, Richard Hayes was sentenced to twenty 20 years imprisonment following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising and released in June 1917. Hayes was again arrested and imprisoned between May 1918 and March 1919 and from November 1920 to July 1921. During the War of Independence when not imprisoned, Richard Hayes provided medical care and attention for members of the Irish Volunteers and IRA. He also provided a report on the remains of Dick McKee and Peadar Clancy at the request of Michael Collins following their deaths in British custody. Evidence on the file from Hayes himself and Richard Mulcahy indicates that Hayes was involved with Mulcahy in 1920 in developing aborted plans to use "...medical methods ... to combat the British Forces" the exact nature of these plans is unclear from the file.


Kelly James. (Seámus Kelly/ Seámus O' Ceallaigh). Skerries Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 20th of October 1986, aged about 19 years old during the Rising. Fought as the R.I.C. Barracks at Donabate and Ashbourne. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising James Kelly was interned until December 1916. Between 1917 and February 1921 James Kelly served with the Irish Volunteers and IRA in an organisational/training capacity in counties Offaly, Mayo and Dublin and served as Battalion Vice Commandant in counties Mayo and Dublin. In February 1921 Kelly returned to county Offaly and claims to have served as Brigade Quartermaster until his arrest on 6 April 1921 (there is some confusion and disagreement recorded on file from the 1st Offaly Brigade IRA members as to the holders of staff positions in the Brigade during 1921). On 27th of March 1921 James Kelly took part in an unsuccessful attempt by the IRA to derail a British troop train travelling from Athlone, County Westmeath to the Curragh, County Kildare. His arrest followed his part in an unsuccessful attack on a member of the RIC (referred to as a "Black and Tan" on file) in Tullamore on 1 April 1921. James Kelly was interned at Rath Camp, the Curragh and took part in an unsuccessful escape attempt there in October 1921, ill health resulting from a beating received following this escape attempt curtailed his later activities and service. He was then transferred to internment in Kilkenny from which he escaped along with an unspecified number of other IRA prisoners on 21 November 1921. During the Civil War he mobilised for an aborted anti-Treaty IRA attack on National Army forces in September 1922 and also did some intelligence work. Kelly later joined the Defence Forces during the Emergency (Second World War) where he held the rank of Acting Captain. Kelly relinquished his commission on 1 April 1946.


Kelly Matthew. Lusk Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1884 died on the 16th of June 1959, aged about 32 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Swords, Killeek, Donabate, Garristown Dublin and the R.I.C. Barracks Ashbourne County Meath. Matthew Kelly was wounded during fighting against RIC/British forces at Ashbourne on Friday 28 April 1916. He was interned after the Rising until December 1916.


Kent Edmund


Lawless Colm. (Ó Laosdhláish). Swords Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1901 died on the 29th of October 1966, aged about 15 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Finglas, Lusk, Swords, Donabate, Garristown and Ashbourne areas. He was a student at St. Enda's College, Rathfarnham. Colm Lawless served as a Vice Battalion Commandant with the IRA and as a Captain while attached to the National Army. During the War of Independence he took part in the destruction of a number of unoccupied RIC Barracks as well as in the attack on Rush RIC Barracks in 1920. He was arrested in January 1921 and interned at Ballykinlar until December the same year. From the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 he served as a Volunteer attached to the National Army forces at Balbriggan serving for approximately two months in that capacity and taking part in operations in the North County Dublin area. He was the son of Frank Lawless T.D. and the brother of Colonel Joseph V. Lawless both of whom took part in the Rising.  


Frank Lawless

Lawless Frank, Born in Saucerstown he was an ardent support of the Irish Language movement and the G.A.A. He served as Quarter-Master and Captain during Easter Week. He was sentenced to Death and served time in prison in the UK, prisoner number q108. His eldest son James was arrested and interned in Frongoch, his second son Colum was also arrested. He became a T.D. after Independence.


James Vincent Lawless

Lawless James Vincent. Battalion Adjutant, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1879 died on the 12th of December 1939, aged about 37 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Knocksedan, Finglas, Killeek, RIC Barracks, Swords, Swords, RIC Barracks, Donabate, RIC Barracks, Garristown, Barronstown, RIC Barracks, Ashbourne, County Meath and Newbarn and Kilsallaghan areas. During the Easter Rising James Vincent Lawless served at an Irish Volunteers Battalion Adjutant. Following the surrender he was tried by a British Army Court-martial and sentenced to death - later commuted to ten 10 years penal servitude, prisoner number q109. He was released on 18 June 1917. James Lawless was a member of the IRB from 1907, member of Fianna Éireann from 1909 and member of the Irish Volunteers from 1913. He was a member of the Saint Vincent de Paul Society and the Sacred Heart Sodality. Prior to the Easter Rising he served as an Irish Volunteers company Commanding Officer and as Officer Commanding of the Fingal Battalion until February 1916. Following his release in 1917 he used his position as an official with Dublin County Council to provide intelligence, often directly to Michael Collins, regarding communications networks, the movement and provision, from County Council sources, of explosives, and registration details of British military and police vehicles. James Lawless also served and worked on the Dáil Éireann Commission on Local Government from August 1920 at the request and direction of Michael Collins. James Vincent Lawless was arrested on 1 February 1920 and interned until 18 May 1920 when he was released following a hunger strike. He was rearrested on 6 December 1920 and interned until December 1921.


Lawless Joseph Vincent. Lieutenant, Swords Company, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 3rd of August 1969, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Rogerstown Bridge and at the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords, Donabate and Ashbourne. He served as a Brigade Engineering Officer and he took part in the Collinstown raid in 1919 and was involved in the manufacture of munitions at 198 Parnell Street, Dublin. He supplied cars for the use of Richard McKee, Officer Commanding, Dublin Brigade IRA, and Joseph O'Reilly, Courier in Chief to Michael Collins. Subject was arrested on the 10th December 1920 and interned at Arbour Hill prison and the Curragh Camp until his escape in October 1921. He joined the National Army in February 1922 but resigned the following March/April re-joining following the outbreak of the Civil War on 28 June of that year. He lost his right little finger in an accident at Richmond Barracks, travelling on a British Military vehicle while in custody on 30th April 1916.


Lawless Monica (Dot Fleming) Cumann na mBan, attached to the 5th (Fingal) Battalion, Dublin Brigade. Born in 1897 died on the 22nd of November 1975, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Served in the Finglas, Knockshadan, Swords, Newbarn, Killsallaghan, Ashbourne, Saucerstown and Fingal areas. Her sister Kate and two brothers Michael and Thomas also served during the Rising. During the Rising she carried dispatches to Wicklow, Saucerstown and Drumcondra. She also provided Volunteers with provisions and attended the wounded in Ashbourne after the fighting. She helped with the burial of a Volunteer John Crenigan who was Killed in Action during the fighting as Ashbourne County Meath. She was arrested in Saucerstown on the Monday after the Rising and detained for two or three days. After the Rising she spent a week visiting prisoners in Knutsford and Manchester Jails England. During the War of Independence her house was used to dump arms and the family shop in Drumcondra was used as a HQ for dispatches. She helped carrying arms and delivering messages to prisoners in Arbour Hill and Kilmainham. She helped several men on the run and provided disguises so they could escape to America. During the Civil War she took the Anti-Treaty side and provided a safe house for Liam Mellows after the Four Courts she also visited and provided parcels for prisoners. Her activities ceased about the end of August due to ill health.


McAllister Bernard. (Bennie). Swords Company. 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers.  Born in 1894 died on the 8th of July 1962, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Swords and Donabate County Dublin and Ashbourne County Meath areas. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Bernard McAllister was interned until December 1916. From 1918 and throughout the War of Independence he served in the Irish Volunteers and IRA as Battalion Officer Commanding. During the War of Independence McAllister took part in a number of IRA operations including the raid on Collinstown Aerodrome in 1919, and in 1920 and 1921 attacks on Rush RIC Barracks and other attacks on British military and police in Swords and Balbriggan as well as attacks on coastguard stations and on Lusk Remount Depot. Arrested in June 1920 he was released in December the same year. In May 1922 Bernard McAllister joined the National Army and served throughout the Civil War. He resigned from the Defence Forces with effect from 26 January 1927.


Maxwell Thomas. (Tom)  “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1890 died on the 9th of March 1953, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Ashbourne, County Meath, Swords, Donabate, Lusk and Garristown areas. Interned until December 1916. He served with the National Army for the duration of the Civil War and with the I.R.A. during the War of Independence. He left the Defence Forces in April 1924 having served at the rank of Sergeant with the Military Police. During the War of Independence he took part in the destruction of Howth Coastguard Station in May 1921.


Moran Peter. Volunteer, Saint Margaret's Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Irish Volunteers. Born in 1881 died on the 29th of March 1940, aged about 35 years old during the Rising. Fought at Finglas, Killeek County Dublin and at Garristown, Swords, Donabate and Ashbourne R.I.C. barracks. He was deported after the surrender, he was released from Frongoch in July 1916. He served from the Tuesday to the Saturday, he was given leave to go home on the Saturday and was arrested on the following Wednesday (3rd of May). He re-joined the Company and served throughout the War of Independence, he was involved in intelligence work mainly relating to Military movement at Collinstown Aerodrome. He was arrested on 9th of December 1920 while leaving Mass and interned until the 8th of December 1921. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Morgan John Eamon. Lusk Company, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1902 died on the 15th of August 1962. During the Easter Rising he acted as look-out at Blake’s Cross, Lusk, County Dublin. Morgan took part in the Howth gun running. During the Easter Rising he was on outpost duty at Blake's Cross. Following the Easter Rising Morgan was not interned and he assisted in distributing proceeds of the Prisoners Aid Society. He took part in an attack on Rush Barracks and that he and Joseph Connelly robbed Leslie Montgomery of a sum of money, which was later, returned. He was arrested by British forces and imprisoned for 14 months before been released by Michael Collins in January 1922. He enlisted in the National Forces in March or April 1922 at Beggars Bush Barracks and carried dispatches from Michael Collins to the Four Courts. He was discharged as medically unfit on 22 March 1924 at the rank of Lieutenant.


Mulcahy Richard, Vice-Commandant. Initially posted at the G.P.O. Connolly sent him to Howth to cut the undersea telephone wires between Dublin and London, unable to return to Dublin he went to Ashbourne where Ashe appointed him Vice-Commandant. He succeeded Michael Collins as Commander in Chief of the Free State Army.


Murphy Eamon (Éamonn). 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1882 died on the 2nd of July 1959, aged about 34 years old during the Rising. Fought at Ashbourne County Meath and Cabra Dublin. Following the Easter Rising he was not interned and escaped as he was wanted for trouble in Liverpool. Murphy enlisted in the National Forces in March 1922 at Portobello Barracks and was demobilised from the Defence Forces on 3 July 1924.


Murphy Francis Ciaran. Lusk Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 29th of December 1974, aged about 19 years old during the Rising. Fought in the R.I.C. Barracks at Donabate, Garristown, Swords and Ashbourne. During the War of Independence Murphy took part in IRA raids for arms and took part in an attack on Rush RIC Barracks in 1920. Forced to go on the run in late 1920 his activities and service ceased.


Norton William.
 Swords Company, Fingal Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1869 died on the 4th of March 1940, aged about 48 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Swords and Killeek County Dublin and Ashbourne County Meath areas. He evaded capture after the Rising and took no part in the War of Independence or Civil War. He is recorded in the 1911 census as an agricultural laboured, single aged 41and living at 9 Lispopple Kilsallaghan County Dublin with his parents, brother and sister. Languages spoken are not recorded.
His brother Joseph died from pneumonia in November 1917 only months after being released from Lewes Prison where he had been deported after fighting in the Mendicity Institute during Easter Week. His illness was a result of the conditions which he had to endure while in Lewes Prison.

Nugent Christopher. (Christy) 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 2nd of August 1896 died on the 14th of June 1964, aged 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Rathbeale Cross, Knocksiddane, Ashbourne, County Meath, RIC Barracks Donabate, RIC Barracks, Swords and New Barn areas. Following the Easter Rising Nugent was interned until August 1916. Re-joined the Irish Volunteers in 1917. During the War of Independence he took part in the burning of Rogerstown Coast Guard Station and the burning of Santry and Malahide barracks. Also took part in the capture of Rush Barracks and two ambushes at Lissenhall and Ballough. He is recorded in the 1911 census as a 14 year old living with his mother and sister. His mother is listed as head of household and kept a boarding house at 13 Main Street, Swords East, County Dublin. All the family spoke Irish.


O'Ceallaigh Peadar  (Peter Kelly). Volunteer, 5 Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Swords Company, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 11th of January 1961. Fought at Finglas, Killeek, the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords and Donabate, Garristown and Newbarn County Dublin and at Ashbourne County Meath. At the time of the Rising he was employed as a Civil Servant with the Irish Land Commission. He joined the Volunteers in 1914 and helped Frank Lawless in organising the Swords Company. He was deported after the surrender first to Wandsworth and then Frongoch, he was released in December 1916 he also lost his job with the Land Commission as a result of his taking part in the Rising. He re-joined the Company after release and served during the War of Independence. He was arrested in December 1920 and interned until December 1921, he had no further activity after his release. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Rafferty John. (Jack) Lusk Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 22nd of February 1892 died on the 23rd of February 1959, aged 24 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Finglas, RIC Barracks, Swords, RIC Barracks, Donabate, RIC Barracks, Garristown, New Barn,  Newbarn, Kilsallaghan, and the RIC Barracks, Ashbourne, County Meath areas. He was wounded and his brother Thomas was killed during an attack on the RIC Barracks, Ashbourne. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until December 1916. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers upon reorganisation and took part in the usual activities until he dropped out in December 1917. Rafferty joined an Gárda Síochána on 30 August 1923.


Rooney Edward Joseph. (Ned) Captain, Lusk Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in1885 died on the 26 of June 1960, aged about 31 years old during the Rising. Took part in the fighting at the R.I.C. barracks at Donabate, Garristown and Swords County Dublin and at Ashbourne County Meath. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Edward Rooney was interned until December 1916. At the time of the 1916 Rising he was serving as an Irish Volunteer Company Officer Commanding. He was wounded during the fighting as Ashbourne. He is recorded in the 1911 census as a farmer’s son and in later life took over the farm. He spoke Irish.


Seaver Thomas. Volunteer, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1894 died on the 7th of April 1948, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Fought at Finglas, Knocksedan and the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords, Donabate, Garristown and Ashbourne. He was detained after the surrender and deported being released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He served throughout the War of independence. He did not take part in the Civil War.  


Sherwin Patrick. Volunteer, Lusk Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 19th of December 1959, aged about 27 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Knocksedan, the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords Donabate and Garristown, the Fingal area Dublin and Ashbourne County Meath. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford then Frongoch, he was released about the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on release but appears to have had no active service after April 1917.


Stafford Edward (Ned), Swords, Co. Dublin, Butcher’s Assistant. Taken from Richmond Barracks, Dublin, on May 2nd, and lodged in Knutsford Detention Barracks on May 3rd.  The following report on his funeral was in the Irish Times dated 26th of February 1923. The funeral took place to Swords cemetery yesterday with full military honours of Vol. Edward Stafford , The Green , Swords , who died in Peamount Sanatorium , from tuberculosis contracted on active service . The brass and reed band and a firing party and Guard of Honour under Capt. T. O’Doherty , attended from Collins Barracks , as well as a large party of troops from Dublin . Staff Capt. Stafford , St. Brecan’s Hospital , had charge of the funeral arrangements . All business was suspended in Swords as the cortege passed though.


Taylor Joseph. (Joe) Swords Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 10th of March 1932, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. He was involved in the fighting at the R.I.C. barracks at Swords, Donabate, Garristown County Dublin and at Ashbourne County Meath. He joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising, during which he was wounded, he was interned until December 1916. During the War of Independence he served as an Irish Volunteer and IRA Company Lieutenant and Company Commanding Officer. He took part in various IRA operations and activities in north County Dublin including raids for arms, attack on Rush RIC Barracks, the burning of RIC barracks at Santry and Malahide and an attack on British forces near Santry. Arrested in February 1921 he was interned until December of that year and his home and business premises burned by British forces. In July 1922 following the outbreak of the Civil War, Joseph Taylor volunteered to assist the National Army forces in his area serving until August of that year and taking part in operations against anti-Treaty IRA forces. He never formally joined the National Army or Defence Forces. He is recorded on the 1911 census as living at 23 Main Street, Swords East with his parents and eleven siblings. He spoke Irish. He was one of 197 prisoners taken from Richmond Barracks Dublin on the 8th of May and taken to Wandsworth Detention Barracks London arriving on the 9th of May.


Weston Bartholomew. (Bartle) Swords Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. He died on the 3rd of February 1962, there are several conflicting records of his age, the 1901 census records him as 3 years old, the 1911 census records him as 16 years old, the pension records record him as being born in 1884 which would make him 32 years old during the Rising although files in the pension records dated 1926 record him as being 37 years old. Fought at the R.I.C. Barracks at Swords, Donabate, Garristown and Ashbourne. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Bartholomew Weston was interned until December 1916. In 1920 and 1921 during the War of Independence Weston took part in a number of IRA operations in north County Dublin including attacks on RIC barracks at Rush and Donabate, attacks on RIC and British personnel at Swords, Hedgestown, Balbriggan and Corduff, capture and killing of a suspected British spy named Straw, and the burning of Donabate Coastguard Station and the Remount Depot at Lusk. He was a member of the IRB, served as an Irish Volunteers and IRA Company Commanding Officer and was also a member of the Fingal Brigade Active Service Unit. At the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 Bartholomew Weston volunteered for service with the National Forces but never formally attested. He served in Swords and Balbriggan until mid-August of that year. He was one of 303 prisoners taken from Richmond Barracks Dublin on the 2nd of May and lodged in Knutsford Detention Barracks the next day.


Weston Charles. Section Commander, “C” Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1894 died on the 21st of December 1956, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Served in the Railway Bridge, Rush, County Dublin, RIC Barracks, Swords, RIC Barracks, Donabate, RIC Barracks, Ashbourne, County Meath, Ashbourne, County Meath, New Barn,  / Newbarn, Kilsallaghan, County Dublin areas. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Charles Weston was interned until December 1916. On his release he took part in the reorganisation of the Irish Volunteers and from 1917 served as a Company and Battalion Officer Commanding and Company Lieutenant with the Irish Volunteers and IRA. During the War of Independence Charles Weston took part in a number of IRA operations including in north County Dublin including: the raid on Collinstown aerodrome in March 1919, the attack on Rush RIC Barracks in April 1920, the burning of RIC barracks at Malahide and Santry, burning of Donabate and Malahide coastguard stations and attacks on British military and RIC personnel in Balbriggan and Hedgestown in 1921. He was arrested in October 1920, released later the same year rearrested in May 1921 and interned until December of that year. Following his release Charles Weston re-joined his unit and at the outbreak of the Civil War he served as an unpaid volunteer with the National Forces for about five weeks in the Swords and Balbriggan areas. He formally joined the National Army in December 1922 serving until discharged from the Defence Forces in December 1923 at the rank of Captain. He was one of 303 prisoners taken from Richmond Barracks Dublin on the 2nd of May and lodged in Knutsford Detention Barracks the next day.


Adrian Molly, messenger.

 

Lawless Eveleen.  Central Branch (Ard Craogh), Attached to 5 Fingal Battalion, Attached to Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1900 aged about 16 years old at the time of the Rising. Served in the Finglas, Swords, Newtown, Killsallaghan County Dublin and Ashbourne, County Meath areas. She was a member of Cumann na mBan prior to 1916. She took part in the battle of Ashbourne and remained active in the Dublin area until 1921. From 1916 onwards, she carried despatches, raised funds, and did intelligence work, working closely with her sister, Kathleen Lawless, Kitty Fleming of 140 Drumcondra Road, and later, Department of Industry and Commerce and Dot Fleming, Monica Lawless. From the end of 1917 to 20th August 1920, she was appointed under the General Michael Collins to work at 6 Harcourt Street and later 76 Harcourt Street. She became a Nun after independence.  

 

McAllister Kathleen. Nee Lawless AKA Bean Mac Alastair, Caitlin. Swords Branch, 5 Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1899 died on the 2nd of January 1979, aged about 17 years old during the Rising. Served in the Swords, Killeek, Baldwinstown, Garristown and Ashbourne, County Meath areas. Prior to the 1916 Easter Rising Kathleen McAllister assisted in the removal of arms to her father's, Frank Lawless, house in Saucerstown, County Dublin. During the Rising McAllister carried despatches, assisted in the acquisition and delivery of supplies for the Irish Volunteers and carried out first aid activity. Although briefly detained for one day following the surrender she was not interned. Later in 1916 she travelled to Knutsford and Manchester in England and helped to organise assistance for Irish prisoners held at those locations. She also received information from prisoners regarding arms dumped after the Rising which she helped to retrieve. During the War of Independence Kathleen McAllister assisted in the storage and transportation of arms, carried despatches and provided safe houses for IRA men on the run. Her activity ceased at the end of the War of Independence on 11 July 1921.


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The following is a list of names of persons recorded on some internet sites as having taken part in the fighting at Ashbourne, I have been able to find no official records that they took part. If you have any information relating to their participation please let me know.


  • Farrelly Walter
  • Gowan Jack
  • Houlihan or Holohan Paddy

  • McAllister John

  • McAllister Michael

  • McCann John

  • McArdle James

  • McArdle Patrick

  • O’Connor James

  • O’Reilly Arthur

  • Reilly Thomas
  • Rooney James Joseph. Born in 1884, aged about 32 at the time of the Rising. He is mentioned in the witness statement of Joseph V Lawless as being involved in the Volunteers around the time of the Rising and his brother Edward Joseph took part in the fighting and was wounded at Lusk. He spoke Irish.

  • Sheehan Paddy
  • Teeling Nicholas
  • Thornton Joe
  • Walsh William