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Begley Daniel Joseph. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 21st of September 1940, aged about 28 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park and in the area of the Four Courts. He was deported after the surrender and sent first to Knutsford Jail and then Frongoch, he was released at the end of August 1916.  He was suspended from all activities in connection with the Irish Volunteers from May 1919 onwards by Dick McKee, following a special report made to British Intelligence by Det. Sergeant McCabe of the Dublin Metropolitan Police. He joined the National Army on the 4th of March 1922 and served up to retirement at the rank of Captain on the 4th of November 1938.


Boland Patrick James. Volunteer, A Company, 1st Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. After the Magazine Fort he joined the fighting in Church Street. He was born on the 17th of February 1880 and died on the 3rd of March 1969, he was 36 years of age at the time of the Rising. He joined the Volunteers in 1913 he was also a member of the I.R.B. He was deported after the surrender and sent first to Stafford Jail and transferred to Frongoch sometime in June, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers after his release and served up to 1919 when he ceased activities, he did not take part in the War of Independence or Civil War.


Dempsey James. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 4th of January 1986, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park and in North King Street. He was injured in the fighting in North King Street and taken to Richmond Hospital, he escaped from the hospital and was not arrested or deported. He lost his job after the Rising due to his Volunteer activities, he was working as a labourer.  He re-joined the Company on reorganisation and served throughout the War of Independence during which he took part in a number of operations. These included raids for arms and mails between 1918 and 1920, the killing of suspected British intelligence operatives at 22 Lower Mount Street, Dublin on the 21st of November 1920 known as Bloody Sunday, the attack on members of the Auxiliary Police Force at the London North Western Railway Hotel, North Wall, Dublin in April 1921, and operations of the Belfast Boycott Unit. He was arrested on the 6th of December 1920 and released on the 30th of January 1921. In March 1922 he joined the National Army and at the outbreak of the Civil War took part on the assault on the anti-Treaty force in the Four Courts in June 1922. He was wounded during this fighting and briefly hospitalised. On 28 November 1922 he was wounded,  losing his left eye, and taken prisoner by Anti-Treaty forces during an engagement at Chuchtown, County Kerry. He continued to serve with the Defence Forces until discharged on Medical Grounds on the 20th of February 1924 while serving at the rank of Commandant.


O'Daly Patrick. (Paddy Daly, Pádraig Ua Dalaigh). E Company (Ranelagh Company), Dublin Battalion, Fianna Éireann. Born in 1888 died on the 16th of January 1957, aged about 28 years old during the Rising, employed as a Carpenter. Patrick O'Daly was in command of attack on Magazine Fort during Easter Rising. During 1917 he served as a member of the Executive of Fianna Éireann and from 1918 to 1919 served successively as a Company Commanding Officer and Battalion Vice Commandant with the Irish Volunteers. He was imprisoned from January to July 1919 after which he joined the IRA General Headquarters Active Service Unit, known as the Squad, serving as its commanding officer for a time up to his arrest on the 23rd of November 1920. During that time he participated in most Squad operations including the killing of Jack Byrnes/John Jameson on the 2nd of March 1920 and Detective Henry Kells on the 13th of April 1920 and the attempted assassinations of Sir John French and General Sir Neville Macready and operations on the 21st of November 1920, known as Bloody Sunday. During the Truce period he became Officer Commanding Dublin Guards and served with the National Army in Dublin during the fighting in June and July 1922 at the outbreak of the Civil War. He later also served in County Kerry. He resigned from the Defence Forces in March 1924 while serving at the rank of Major General.

 

Gilligan Robert (Bob). “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 24th of May 1941.



Holohan Garry (Gearoid Ua h-Uallachain). Quartermaster General and Chief of Staff Fianna Éireann. Joined Na Fianna in 1910 and took a very active part in all their activities. Took part in the raid on the Magazine Fort and then went on to take part in the fighting around the North Dublin Union, the attack on Broadstone Railway Station, the dairy at the corner of Church Street, the burning of Linenhall Barracks and was still fighting on Church Street when the Surrender order arrived.



Holohan is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery Dublin.

 

Holohan Patrick Hugh. Took part in the raid on the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park. Took over the Command of “G” Company when Lieutenant Laffen was wounded near the end of the week.

 

Marié Louis Volunteer, B Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1900 died on the 1st of September 1957, aged about 16 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park, Liberty Hall, the G.P.O., Annesley Bridge and Moore Street.  He was deported after the surrender being released in June 1916. In 1918 he went to England as acted as a currier between Liverpool England and the U.S.A. In March 1920 he was conscripted into the French Army he was released from the French Army in December 1921 and joined the National Army at Beggars Bush in March 1922, he served with the National Army until the 26th of January 1929. He re-joined the Irish Defence forces in 1940 and served up to 1952.

 

Martin Christopher

 

Martin Eamon. Officer Commanding the Dublin Battalion Fianna Éireann. Born 1892 died on the 11th of May 1971, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Magazine Fort, Phoenix Park, Church Street, Great Brunswick Street, North King Street and Broadstone Railway Station, Constitution Hill, Phibsborough areas. Martin joined Fianna Éireann in 1909, was elected to its Executive at its first Árd Fheis, in 1915 and was appointed Commandant, Dublin Brigade, Fianna Éireann as well as Director of Training and Organisation nationally. Martin was also a founder member of the Irish Volunteers becoming a member of that organisations Provisional Committee in 1914 and also acted as assistant to Liam Mellows in Irish Volunteers General Headquarters. He also participated in arms landings at Howth, County Dublin (26 July 1914) and at Kilcoole, County Wexford. During the Easter Rising in 1916 Martin was wounded in the lung on Tuesday 25 April. Martin evaded arrest following the surrender despite his condition and from December 1916 to August 1917 he went to America to recuperate. On his return to Ireland he brought with him plans for an arms landing at County Wexford from John Devoy and Joseph McGarrity which he gave to Michael Collins. From 1917 to 1920 Martin served as Chief of Staff and Director of Training of Fianna Éireann. In November 1920 he joined Liam Mellows in the Quartermaster General's Department of the IRA and went to London that December to set up a Passport Department there making contact with the Communist Party there in the process. He produced passports for Eamon de Valera to allow him to travel to the Irish Race Convention in Paris. From December 1920 to March 1921 he went to Russia seeking Russian recognition of the Irish Republic. In April 1921 he travelled to Berlin on Mellows instructions to make contact with the I.R.A. representative there. The same month he was appointed Fianna representative on the Fianna Éireann Irish Volunteers IRA Composite Council as well as becoming Fianna Director of Training and Organisation. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1922 Martin reported to the anti-Treaty position at Barry's Hotel in Dublin and was captured in July that year while returning to that post from his home. He was interned until December 1922. Martin was also a member of Rathdown Council, Dublin City Council and a District Court Judge.


Murphy John


Murray Edward Joseph. Fianna Eireann. Born on the 24th of July 1897 died on the 19th of January 1984, aged 18 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Liberty Hall, the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park and a Jameson Distillery Marrowbone Lane. He joined Fianna Eireann in 1911. He was detained in Richmond Barracks for about a month after the Rising. In July 1917 he killed Inspector Mills with a Hurley at a demonstration in Beresford Place. He left Ireland the same month and after a few days in Liverpool he went to New York. He was employed on boats that travelled between New York and Ireland and during the War of Independence he helped smuggle arms and ammunition. He returned from New York on the 11th of January 1922. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was arrested in Hill Street and interned until December 1923.


Ó Briain Seán (John). “C” Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born 1888 died on the 11th of October 1966, aged about 28 years old during the Rising, fought in the Magazine Fort, Phoenix Park, Church Street, and Linenhall Barracks, Lisburn Street, areas. He was interned until December 1916. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers upon reorganisation and took part in the Irish Volunteers Convention, Thomas Ashe's funeral and the anti-conscription campaign. During the War of Independence he was involved in making explosives at Dolphin's Barn Bridge for a proposed attack on the Helga. He was involved in intelligence work and he provided information on Leslie Edmonds who was later killed. He was mobilised for the Teeling escape and for an attempted ambush at Rialto Bridge. He took part in armed patrols and an attempted ambush at Dolphin's Barn. He printed material for Dáil Eireann. During the Truce Period (12 July 1921 - 30 June 1922) and took part in the occupation of Fowler Hall.

 

 

Roche Timothy Volunteer, F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1887 died on the 17th of August 1966, aged about 29 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Magazine Fort in the Phoenix Park and North Brunswick and King Street. He was not arrested or detained after the Rising and was on the run until September 1916. During the Rising he was involved in the burning of Linen Hall Barracks and the attack on the Broadstone. He served throughout the War of Independence and was mobilised on Bloody Sunday for an attack at the Four Court Hotel but the target was not present at the hotel when the Volunteers arrived. He was arrested following a raid on Lourdes House on the 24th of November 1920 and released in December 1921. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was arrested after the fall of the Four Courts, he was imprisoned being released in December 1924.