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Adams John, Killed in Action.

 

Alexander Nicholas. Non Commissioned Officer, C Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 9th of February 1883 died on the 20th of June 1964, aged 33 years old at the time of the Rising. He initially went to Jacob’s Biscuit Factory on Easter Monday and was then posted to Saint Stephen’s Green later that day. He was deported after the Rising and served about two months in Knutsford Prison and two months in Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch at the end of August 1916. He was a member of the I.R.B. since 1904 and officer in charge of his company at Thomas Ashe's funeral. He also participated in defence of Sinn Fein Headquarters on Armistice Night 11 November 1918. He was arrested and imprisoned by the British authorities on a number of occasions. He served as company First Lieutenant and took part in the Howth Gun Running on the 26th of July 1914 and was N.C.O. in charge of armed guard on Irish Volunteers Headquarters, Dawson Street, on one night in weeks preceding the 1916 Easter Rising. He ceased activities sometime in 1921 due to ill health. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Allen Mary. (Devereux, Mary) Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 10 of May 1899 died on the 24th of January 1945, aged 16 at the time of the Rising. She was employed in Jacobs Biscuit Factory, Bishop Street, Dublin. She fought in the Royal College of Surgeons, Saint Stephen's Green areas. Mary Allen was sent home on Wednesday 26 April from the College of Surgeons on account of her age.


Bannon John. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 8th of June 1948. Fought at Harcourt Street Railway Station, Saint Stephen's Green and Royal College of Surgeons. He was deported after the surrender and served time in Knutsford and then Frongoch, he was released in August 1916. He remained with the Irish Citizen Army until the end of the War of Independence taking part in the usual activities. He mobilised for the Civil War on the 23rd of June 1922 but was sent home sick and did not take part.


Barry John. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 9th of November 1891 died on the 15th of September 1963, aged 24 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and Little's Public House Harcourt Street. He was not arrested or detained after the surrender, he spent about 3 months on the run. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.


Bermingham Peter. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Dorn in 1896 died on the 30th of August 1947, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was not detained after the Rising. He joined the Irish Citizen Army in 1914. He joined C Company 3rd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers March 1918 and served up to the 31st of March 1919 when he resigned due to ill health. He did not serve in the War of Independence or in the Civil War.


Bradley Luke. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1894 died on the 3rd of November 1976, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Worked as a labourer at the time of the Rising. Served with the National Army from 1 July 1922 to the end of the Civil War in 1923. He was demobilised from the Defence Forces in December 1923 having served as Officer Commanding of Athboy Barracks.


Bradley Patrick. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1893 died on the 20th of February 1972, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and in Little’s Public House on Harcourt Street. He was deported to Frongoch after the surrender, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He joined the Volunteers on re-organisation in 1917 and served up to the end of 1918. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Brougham James. “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1880 died on the 26th of December 1942, aged about 36 years old during the Rising. He was employed as a Labourer in Dublin Dockyard at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Jacob's Biscuit Factory, Bishop Street and Turkish Baths, Saint Stephen's Green areas. He was captured after the Rising and interned until August 1916. He joined the National Army in August 1922 and continued to serve until leaving the Defence Forces on 15 April 1924, Army service number 54721.

 

Burke Edward. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1888 died on the 22nd of December 1949, aged about 28 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Leeson Street and the Royal College of Surgeons Saint Stephen's Green. He was deported after the Rising and after detention in Stafford Jail he was transferred to Frongoch, he was released in December 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War, he was captured on the Night of the Bridges and imprisoned in Maryborough and Tintown and released on 23rd of October 1923.

 

Buttner Patrick. Boy Scout, Irish Citizen Army. Served at Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. Born in 1900 died on the 16th of February 1984, aged about 16 at the time of the Rising. He went to Stephen’s Green on the Monday and at 11am on the Tuesday morning Bob de Coeur sent him home due to his young age.  He spent Monday delivering dispatches between Liberty Hall and Saint Stephen’s Green. He spent Monday night on Saint Stephen’s Green but had to retreat to the College of Surgeons about 5am due to sniping by British Soldiers from the Shelbourne Hotel. He was not arrested after the surrender. On the 1st Anniversary of the Rising he was arrested for selling small paper flags depicting Connolly and Mallin, he was detained at Store Street for 48 hours. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was captured on the 5th August after the Night of the Bridges and detained until December 1923.


Byrne Christopher. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 12th of January 1898 died on the 17th of August 1932, aged 18 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was interned after the Rising being released in August 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence, he was arrested by British Forces after the attack on the Customs House in May 1921 and interned until December 1921. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army serving with the Military Police at Tintown Interment Camp at the Curragh in Kildare. He left the National Army in March 1924 at the rank of Lieutenant, army number SDR201.

 

Byrne James

 

Byrne Joseph. “E” Company 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 11th of October 1966, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Royal College of Surgeons, Strahan's, and School of Music areas. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was detained at the College of Surgeons after the surrender and deported, he was released from Frongoch about the end of July 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on reorganisation in 1917 and remained up to the time of the funeral of Thomas Ashe, he had no further service after that, he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.



Caffrey Christina (Chris Keeley Caffrey-Keeley). Ann Devlin Branch, Glasgow Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1898, aged about 18 years old during the Rising. Served in the Saint Stephen’s Green and Royal College of Surgeons.  Delivered dispatches, On one occasion when delivering a dispatch from the College of Surgeons to Jacob’s she dressed and a widow in mourning a style popularly known as ‘Widow’s Weeds’ at the time, she would also have a Dublin Fusiliers badge prominently displayed on her ‘Widow’s Weeds’ to give the impression she was mourning her dead Dublin Fusilier husband. She also carried explosives and ammunition periodically from Glasgow to Dublin up to the Truce.


Campbell George. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1898 died on the 6th of July 1953, aged about 18 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Railway Station, Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen’s Green and the College of Surgeons. He was a member of Na Fianna up to 1911 and a member of the Fintan Lawlor Pipe Band from 1912 to 1917. He did not take part in the War of Independence and took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War joining the National Army on the 29th of August 1922 and served up to the 17th of November 1924 as a Private with the Motor Transport Corps Army number 40842.


Carroll Michael. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 24th of March 1883 died on the 26th of February 1949, aged 33 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Railway Station on Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen's Green and Leeson Street. He joined the Citizen Army about six months before the Rising. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford then Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army immediately after release and up to the Truce he used his position as a dock worker to remove smuggled arms and ammunition from cargo ships and get them through customs and dock security. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Carton Eugene. (Owen). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 7th of February 1937. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and at Davy's Public House on the corner of South Richmond Street and Charlemont Mall. Took part in the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed. He worked for the Midland Railway at the time of the Rising. He was deported after the surrender and deported first to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released on the 23rd of December 1916. He joined the Irish Volunteers in 1917 and served throughout the War of Independence, he was arrested on the 21st of February 1921 and interned until December 1921. Although he joined the National Army at the time of the Civil War he left the National Army and took the Anti-Treaty side.

 

Chaney Patrick. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1884 died on the 23rd of August 1948, aged about 32 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He joined the Citizen Army in 1913. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Stafford Jail, he was released at the end of July 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army and served up to the middle of 1919 then dropped out. He had no further service and did not take part in the Civil War.


Chaney William. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1893 died on the 13th of February 1945, aged about 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was deported after the surrender to Stafford Jail, he was released about the end of June 1916. He served with the Citizen Army up to about March 1919 then dropped out, he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Charlton Michael. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1893 died on the 3rd of August 1970, aged about 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen's Green, Leeson Street, the Royal College of Surgeons and the Ladies Club on Saint Stephen’s Green. He joined the Citizen Army in 1915. He was deported after the surrender, first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released in July 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army on his release and served up to the Truce. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Clarke Philip, Killed in Action.

 

Clifford Thomas. (Tom) “G” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died in 1970, aged about 23 during the Rising. From about the middle of 1918 up to the end of the War of Independence Thomas Clifford served as a Battalion Officer Commanding with the Irish Volunteers and IRA. During that period he was involved in a number of Irish Volunteers and IRA operations and activities. These included arms raids, manufacture of munitions, killing of suspected spies and attacks on British forces and targets including Causeway and Abbeydorney Barracks and Ballyheyne Castle in 1920 and 1921 and was part of an IRA unit surprised by RIC (Black and Tans) near Ardfert while en route to planned attack on British military, two IRA members were killed and two  taken prisoner according. Thomas Clifford was also imprisoned on a number of occasions between 1919 and 1921 and imprisoned at Cork and Belfast jails. Thomas Clifford went into training camps during the Truce Period and took no part in the Civil War.


Coates Peter. Private Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 29th of December 1951 aged about 24 during the Rising. He fought in the  Liberty Hall, Beresford Place, Saint Stephen's Green, Royal College of Surgeons, Saint Stephen's Green areas. Interned after the Rising until December 1916. Took part in the War of Independence and Civil War he participated in a raid for arms on Portobello Barracks and in 1918 and on a supply ship of the Army of the United States of America. In 1921 he took part in the attack on the Custom House and in 1922 fought against National Army forces in Dublin at the outbreak of the Civil War and participated in a number of other attacks against Government (National Army) forces in 1922 and 1923.


Connolly William Joseph. Sergeant possibly Captain, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1893 died on the 11th of May 1956, aged about 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Liberty Hall, the G.P.O and Saint Stephen’s Green. He joined the Citizen Army in 1914. He was employed as a Fairman stationed and living at Tara Street fire Station at the time of the Rising. During the Rising he commandeered a car and made several trips loaded with arms and ammunition from Liberty Hall to the G.P.O. He then went to Saint Stephen’s Green where he remained until the surrender apart form on two occasions he delivered dispatches from Commandant Mallon to Commandant Connolly at the G.P.O and on one occasion he collected food from Jacobs. On Monday the 24th April he was driving Francis O’Brien when they were fired on in Stephen's Green, Francis O’Brien was hit and as a result he was hospitalised and detained for some months and unable to renew his activities until 1918. William Connolly stated they were fired on accidently by their own men.   He was deported after the surrender first to Wandsworth and then Frongoch, he was released in July 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.


Conroy Eileen

 

Conroy John. (Sean). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 8th of February 1896 died on the 15th of January 1937, aged 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and in the Royal College of Surgeons. He was deported after the surrender, released in December 1916. He transferred from the Citizen Army in April 1921. He served throughout the War of Independence taking part in operations including an attack on British forces at Talbot Street, Dublin and the dumping of goods seized as part of the Belfast Boycott campaign. He also undertook Republican police work. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War joining the National Army in March 1922 and served until discharged medically unfit on the 28th of July 1923.

 

Corcoran James, Killed in Action.

 

Courtney Bernard

 

Craven Barney

 

Crothers Christopher. Lieutenant, Citizen Army Boy Scouts, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1902 died on the 19th of April 1982, aged about 14 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in Saint Stephen’s Green and the Railway Station at Harcourt Street. He was on duty at Liberty Hall for about two weeks before the Rising and was involved in collecting arms and ammunition from around the Dublin. On Easter Sunday and Monday morning he was carrying dispatches for Padraig Pearse. He was also stationed at Harcourt Railway Station covering the retreat from Davey’s Public House. On the Tuesday Countess Markievicz ordered him to gather all the boys together, Paddy Butler and Mick Dwyer were the only two he could find, they were ordered to go home because the British had opened machine-gun fire from the Shelbourne Hotel and the situation was becoming too dangerous. He served throughout the War of Independence and was mainly involved in intelligence work including gathering information on targets for Bloody Sunday. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.

 

Cullen Patrick. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 8th of January 1978. Fought at the Railway Station on Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen’s Green and at the Royal College of Surgeons. He joined the Citizen Army in January 1916. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Stafford Jail and Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He remained with the Citizen Army up to the Truce in July 1921, he did not take part in the Civil War.


Daniels Harry

 



Captain Robert De Coeur.

De Coeur Robert. (Bob, Stout). Lieutenant promoted to Captain after the Rising, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1880 died on the 9th of April 1935, aged about 36 years old during the Rising. He joined the Citizen Army in 1913. He was detained after the Rising and sent to Knutsford Prison, he was released in August or September 1916. He re-joined the Irish Citizen Army (ICA) upon release and started to reorganise. He assisted in procuring munitions and enforcing the Belfast boycott. He acted as a recruiting agent for the ICA and used to transfer men to the IRA. During the Civil War he was in action on the Anti-Treaty side in O'Connell Street and was arrested and interned until December 1923.


Devlin Ann. (Anastasia). Inghinidhe Branch, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born on the 20th of September 1860 died on the 27th of January 1951, aged 55 years old at the time of the Rising. Served at Harcourt Street, Merrion Square, Boland's Bakery/Boland's Mills on Grand Canal Street, at the Saint Stephen's Parochial Hall on Northumberland Road, the Four Courts and Saint Stephen’s Green. She joined Cumann na mBan in 1914. Before the Rising she assisted in moving arms and ammunition around Dublin. During the Rising she was involved in acquiring and delivering food and ammunition to various garrisons. She was not arrested or detained after the surrender and continued activities with Cumann na mBan throughout the War of Independence. She took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War during which she procured medical supplies from Earlsfort Terrace and assisted in the removal of an arms dump at Gardiner Street. She was arrested in March 1923 and interned until October 1923.




James Donnelly

Donnelly James. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1898 died on the 14th of September 1944, aged about 17 years old at the time of the Rising. He took part in the fighting at Stephen’s Green and the College of Surgeons. During the 1916 Rising he took part, under the command of Countess Markievicz, in an attempt to burn the Shelbourne Hotel on Stephen’s Green which was being used by the British Army to snipe on Volunteers occupying Stephen’s Green. He was arrested at the surrender and detained until the 8th of May 1916. During the War of Independence he served with C Company 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade I.R.A. He joined the Free State Army on the 29th of February 1922, he was discharged medically unfit from the Defence Forces on 12 January 1925 while serving at the rank of Sergeant.


Donnelly Michael. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1889 died on the 9th of December 1939, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought at the Railway Station on Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was interned after the surrender, he was released about the 1st of August 1916. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War but took no part in the fighting.


Doyle Christina Mary (Ni Dubhghaill Maire). Cumann na mBan Ard Craobh Branch (Central Branch) Dublin. Born in 1864, aged about 52 years old during the Rising. On Easter Sunday she took first aid equipment and got to St Stephen's Green where she remained until the evening, distributing food and doing other duties. After Easter Week, she continued to attend meetings, visited prisoners and helped collecting funds for distressed families. She joined Cumann na mBan at the inaugural meeting in 1913 and was a member of the Ranelagh Branch until February 1922.


Doyle Dennis


Doyle Joseph. Irish Citizen Army. Born 1878 died on the 26th of July 1958, aged about 38 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Davy's Public House, South Richmond Street, Railway Station, Harcourt Street, Saint Stephen's Green and Royal College of Surgeons areas. Detained after the Rising until August 1916. After release he participated in a raid for arms at Portobello Barracks in September 1917 and raids for arms on United States of America Army supply ships as well as on Wellington Barracks, Islandbridge Barracks and in the defence of Liberty Hall during the night of 11 November 1918.


Doyle Sylvester Joseph. Fianna Eireann. Born on the 29th of April 1902 died on the 22nd of June 1968, aged 14 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was detained in Richmond Barracks after the surrender and released on the 24th of May 1916, he was not deported due to his age. He had no further activity until September 1921 when he joined E Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, I.R.A. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army on the 12th of April 1922 and served throughout the Civil War. He was transferred to the Defence Forces Reserve on the 3rd of August 1929 and recalled to full service from the 2nd of August 1939 serving during the Emergency.


Duffy Patrick


Dunne Andrew. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1898 died on the 2nd of May 1953, aged about 18 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Liberty Hall, Saint Stephen’s Green, Cuffe Street and at the Royal College of Surgeons. He joined Fianna Eireann when he was 11 years old. He was deported after the Rising first to Knutsford and then Frongoch, he was released about the end of August 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army after release and helped in reorganisation of his own and other companies. He ceased activities soon after release from Frongoch due to failing eye-sight. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.    


Dynan Christopher. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1895 died on the 27th of April 1944, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in Saint Stephen's Green and Merrion Street Post Office areas. Avoided capture and went on the run after the Rising.


Ellis Samuel. Volunteer, “B” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 10th of January 1945, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen's Green, New Street and Jacob's Biscuit Factory, Bishop Street, Dublin. He was arrested after the Rising and deported first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch in August 1916. During the War of Independence Ellis took part in the manufacture of munitions arms raids and street patrols for the Irish Volunteers and IRA. On the 3rd of March 1920 he was arrested by British forces and imprisoned for possession of arms and ammunition until released in May of that year following a hunger strike. Rearrested in May 1921 he was detained until January 1922. In June 1922 Samuel Ellis joined the National Army serving until the following 17th of July when he left to take up civilian employment at Baldonnel Aerodrome. He lost a finger in March 1919 due to an accidental explosion while manufacturing munitions for the Irish Volunteers. His brother Séan Ellis fought at the Four Courts, they both worked in the furniture business in Dublin, Samuel was a cabinet maker.


Ffrench Mullen Madeleine


Fitzgerald Aine (Aine, Ann and Annie Malone). Cumann na mBan, Central Branch, Dublin. Born in 1889 died on the 21st of August 1950, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. She was wounded on Easter Monday at St Stephen's Green while carrying a dispatch to Jacob's Biscuit Factory and was brought to Mercer's Hospital. Stored guns after the shooting of Dublin Metropolitan Police Detective Sergeant Daniel Hoey. Following an attack in Ashtown Dan Breen was brought to her home and received medical attention he remained there for three months and was guarded by Seán Treacy and JJ Hogan. Harry Kelly was brought to her after been wounded during the attempted rescue of Robert Barton. Her home was used to store arms, explosives and documents and was used by squads after attacks. She transported arms to Mountjoy Square and held guns in readiness for a proposed attack on the Mater Hospital. Further claims that she retrieved guns that were used on 21 November 1920, Bloody Sunday, from a property at 22 Mount Street, Dublin. She acted as a decoy on Mountjoy Jail during the attempted rescue of Sean MacEoin. She and her sister transported guns for the Francis Teeling escape, while transporting the arms the tram was stopped at Wexford Street and all the men were searched by British forces. She carried messages to Dublin Castle. She claimed to be Peadar Clancy's sister in order to retrieve his clothes and bicycle from authorities. During the Truce Period, 12th of July 1921 to the 30th of  June 1922 she was living with her sister, Mrs Breen, in Clonmel Barracks and later Cregg House, Carrick-on-Suir. During the attack by National Forces on Carrick-on-Suir Barracks she was sent for reinforcements. Anti-Treaty IRA (Irregulars) took over Cregg House which was later fired on by the National Army. On her return to Dublin in September 1922 she assisted in securing safe houses and deliver dispatches and that her premises was searched on a number of occasions.


Fitzmaurice Gerald. “D” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 3rd of January 1938, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Jacob's Biscuit Factory, Bishop and Turkish Baths, Saint Stephen's Green, Street areas. Participated in the fighting in Dublin at the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 was arrested and interned until December 1922.


Fox James, Killed in Action.


Fox James


Fox Patrick


Foy Martin. Took part in the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed.


Fullerton George


Gahan Mary (May). Cumann na mBan


Geraghty Eugene



Donnelly Helen nee Gifford. The images above shows Nellie Gifford, aged 16. Soon after this, she was teaching cookery and household management in schools in Dublin and Meath, cycling across the counties to teach - and when she taught in National Schools, teaching the children to sing "I am a happy Irish child…" (they were taught to sing "I am a happy English child" at the time). She was the girl who brought Larkin into the Imperial Hotel, disguised as her clergyman uncle; she was in Surgeons with Madame Markiewicz through Easter Week; afterwards, she lectured in the US, and when she returned to Ireland, was a loving and supportive sister to Grace, who had married Joe Plunkett on May 3, 1916, an hour before he was shot, and aunt to the orphaned children of her sister Muriel and Thomas MacDonagh, and mother to her brilliant daughter Maeve. She was the originator of the National Museum of Ireland's collection of 1916 memorabilia, and wrote a history and memoir of her family. Nellie was a lifelong animal lover who spent her meagre spare time finding loving homes for abandoned animals. She and Grace regularly exhibited inventions at science and agriculture shows, which were often brought into production by large companies.

Goff Bridget. Gough. Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 26th of February 1889 died on the 7th of October 1952, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Served in Saint Stephen’s Green and Royal College of Surgeons. She joined the Irish Citizen Army in 1914 and that during the Rising  was mobilised to Liberty Hall on Easter Sunday and again on Monday morning with Nora Connolly. She gave rations to the men there. She was then stationed to St Stephen's Green on the same day until Tuesday morning and to the College of Surgeons until the surrender. She was arrested and was led from Dublin Castle to Kilmainham. She was released on 11 May 1916.



Hackett Rosie, died in 1976 aged 83, she was associated with the activities of Liberty Hall for more than forty years. She first entered the trade union movement as a founder member of the Irish Women Workers’ Union in 1911 and took an active part in the 1913 strike. She joined the Irish Citizen Army on its inception. After an active role in the Rising she took the pro-treaty side in the Civil War and was an ardent supporter of Collins and Griffith. In the mid-1930s she was transferred to the Union’s tobacco shop around the corner from Liberty Hall on Eden Quay, she retired when the shop was demolished as part of the new Liberty Hall. She was buried in Glasnevin Cemetery after full military honours had been rendered by an army detachment.


Halpin William


Hampton James


Hendrick John Joseph. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1897 died on the 19th of January 1985, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green. He was not captured after the surrender and went to Glasgow, Scotland soon after the Rising. He served in the Glasgow Volunteers serving with A and B Company until about the end of 1920 when he went to sea. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army at Portobello Barracks on the 6th of September 1922. He was demobilised on the 24th of May 1924 and then re-joined on the 30th of September 1924 and served up to the late 1940s.  


Henry Fred.


Holden Patrick J.


Hyland Mray (May, Mrs Michael Kelly)


Jackson Peter


James Joyce in Citizen Army uniform

Joyce James. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 26th of March 1948. Fought at Davy's Public House on the corner of South Richmond Street and Charlemont Mall (his place of employment), Saint Stephen’s Green, Little’s Public House and Jacob’s Biscuit Factory. Although part of the Stephen’s Green garrison he was part of a group trapped in Little’s Public House, unable to re-join their own Garrison they made their way to Jacob’s. He was tried after the surrender and sentenced to penal servitude for life commuted to 5 years penal servitude. He was deported first to Dartmoor and he was also detained in Lewis Prison. He was released on the 23rd of June 1917. He was employed at Davey’s Public House up to the 19th of April, on Easter Monday he was part of a group that occupied Davey’s and was recognised by the bookkeeper and manager, both gave evidence against him at his Court Martial. He re-joined the Citizen Army on release and served throughout the War of Independence although took no active part in any fighting. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was involved in the occupation of Barry’s Hotel, he took no further part in the Civil War after leaving Barry’s Hotel. Married to Margaret Joyce, see below.


Joyce Margaret. (Maggie) Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1896 died on the 18th of August 1943, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Served at Liberty Hall making buck-shot in the weeks before the Rising and served at Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons during the Rising. Her main duty was cooking and First Aid. She was detained at Kilmainham until about the 8th of May. She remained with the Citizen Army but took no part in the War of Independence or Civil War. Her husband James Joyce also served, see above.  


Kavanagh Patrick. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1876 died on the 19th of April 1936, aged about 40 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green,  Royal College of Surgeons and the Turkish Baths. He had previous service in Hibernian Rifles. He was captured after the surrender and deported to Stafford and Frongoch and was released in August 1916. He re-joined E Company and served throughout the War of Independence. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was involved in the night of the bridges.


Keenan Thomas



John Kelly (Curran)
Kelly John. Irish Citizen Army Commander, I.C.A. number 37. At the time of the Rising he was 31 years old and married with 2 children. His real name was John Curran, His father, James, raised the family as Kelly, which was James' mother's maiden name. He died in 1960 and was buried under his real name of Curran in Glasnevin Cemetery. He was imprisoned in Frongoch after the Rising and went on to fight in the War of Independence.

Kelly Annie


John Kelly at Scout camp (back row center)

Kelly John. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1884 died in 1960, aged about 32 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Liberty Hall, Davy's Public House at the corner of South Richmond Street and Charlemont Mall, Saint Stephen's Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He joined the Citizen Army at its formation in 1913. He went on the run for about two weeks after the surrender but was captured and after being detained in Richmond Barracks for two weeks he was deported to Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. On the Monday night of the Rising he was part of the garrison at Davy’s and due to heavy enemy fire they were forced to retreat to the Collage of Surgeons, during this retreat he had to drop about forty foot onto a shed roof, when he landed the roof collapsed and he injured his foot. Due to his injury restricting his mobility he was put in charge of some prisoners including a British Army officer Captain Kettle. About the Thursday of the Rising he was moved by ambulance to his home at 5, Swift’s Row on Ormond Quay, the initial intention was to take him to Jervis Street Hospital but it was decided that the risk of capture was too high. He appears to have had no further activity after release and did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Kelly James, Killed in Action.

Kelly Katie,  Born in 1889 died on the 10th of January 1971, aged about 27 years old at the time of the Rising. Served in the Saint Stephen's Green, Royal College of Surgeons and General Post Office areas. She was involved in carrying dispatches and helping with the cooking.

Katie Kelly was born in Lehenagh, Cashel, Connemara. Her father and mother J.D.  and Mary Anne Kelly were the Principals of Cashel National schools. So too was her sister. Patrick Kelly the Bard of Connaught and poet of Cashel was a brother.


In 1916 Katie was staying in Patrick’s house on the North Circular Road. Regular visitors to the house and good friends were the Giffords, Grace who married Joseph Mary Plunkett in prison and Nelly who was to be with her through the events of 1916. Another sister Muriel was married to Thomas MacDonagh. Ned Daly visited often. Ned was Commandant at the Four Courts and was shot by firing squad at the age of 25. James Sullivan who was sentenced to death was another family friend. His sentence was commuted. She had met Countess Markievicz on a number of occasions and had been to a party at her house. So she knew her quite well.

It was on Easter Monday morning that Katie found out from a visitor that the Volunteers were fighting the Military in town. The visitor said that the town was strewn with dead horses. She set off immediately for O’Connell Street. She met a Cumann na mBan woman on her way in to lend a hand. Katie decided for her part to look for the Countess Markievicz and offer her services. She eventually found her after a few hours in St. Stephen’s Green. There she gave her name to a volunteer to ask the Countess could she help. The Countess replied that she would be glad to have her.


She returned to her Brother’s house to explain what she was about to do. Nobody tried to change her mind and she set off back. At Phibsboro Bridge she met Seamus O’Sullivan who was controlling the three bridges to the north. Katie got her first dispatch from Mr. O’Sullivan, a message for the GPO. On delivering her message she was asked to stay but insisted she was needed by the Countess.


At the Green the British had found locations from where they were able to fire into the volunteer positions. By mid morning the volunteers including Katie retreated to the College of Surgeons. There she met Margaret Skinnider, from Scotland who was later very seriously wounded. The Commander was Michael Mallin and the Countess Markievicz was Second in Command. Katie was involved in cooking and collecting food and running dispatches. She brought one dispatch from Mallin to the GPO. On one occasion she was in a room where the Volunteers were having tea and had just moved to get something when a bullet struck the wall where she had been standing.


When Commander Mallin surrendered the following Sunday Katie was not pleased.  All the men had to pile up their weapons in front of an English officer. The Commander saw her weeping. He was surprised she was upset until she shouted in frustration: “Let us out and down as many English as we can”. On their way to Kilmainham there were ‘shawlies’ on the street shouting abuse. They stopped at Richmond Barracks. Here the Countess intervened on Katie’s behalf. She explained that Katie was a volunteer and not a member of Cumann na mBan and should be allowed go free. The officer said that she had come wearing a haversack and so must remain with the rest. Katie herself requested to stay to the end whatever that would bring.


In Kilmainham the treatment was cruel. They slept on plank beds. No bed clothes were provided. No change of clothes was offered either. Nellie Gifford was nearby.  They heard shots fired every day. She says some of the girls knew about the leaders being executed but she had no idea at the time. All she managed to eat was a dog biscuit (as she called it), soaked in water. The doctor called to see if she was on hunger strike. She replied that she would gladly have a cup of tea and bread and butter. He promised to get her a cup but alas it never arrived. This went on for two or three weeks when a knock at the door announced that all were to go to the yard. They were to be released. However Katie had to spend another night as it was past curfew. That she said was her longest night in Kilmainham.


Everyone was asked to make a statement before a military officer. All the women were in Cumann na mBan and Katie was last in so the officer presumed she was too. She explained how on Easter Monday when the Rebellion had started she had volunteered her help and joined the Volunteers in St. Stephen’s Green. He was astonished at her putting her life on the line, and commented that it was a miracle that anyone escaped from St. Stephan’s Green alive. The officer, an Irishman said to her that he too wanted to see Ireland free but that the rebellion was not the way to go about it. Katie informed him: “we never got anything from England except what we fought for.” The officer was a Redmondite who Katie believed would have set her free if he could have.



Katie Kelly in 1966 wearing her 1916 Survivors Medal and her 1916 miniature medal.

(Photo Pat Keane)

We next hear of Katie during the War of Independence. In 1917 the formidable Alice M. Cashel came to Cashel House, Cashel, Connemara, the home of her brother-in-law James O’Mara. With the start of the War of independence Connemara was becoming more militant.  Alice was a chief Organiser for Cumann na mBan and from her base in Cashel managed to bolster the infrastructure in Connemara, and spread the organisation to Achill, through to Sligo, Leitrim, Fermanagh, Cavan and Donegal.  1919 saw Alice back at Cashel House looking after the O’Mara’s Oyster Fisheries. Before very long she was on the run in Clifden being helped by Gerald Bartley.   Her first task in Cashel was to establish with Katie Kelly an active Company of Volunteers. The members got their instructions from Alice and Katie who reported to Headquarters in Galway. Meanwhile the Volunteers were busy. They were engaged in dispatch carrying and in the control of Poitín (poteen) traffic. They attended fairs and markets and patrolled seizing poitín and destroying stills. It was said the IRA patrols were more efficient than the local Constabulary.


There was a military billet in the Courtyard at Cashel House during this period however the soldiers were not allowed in to the house. The soldiers complained of being treated like dogs so not surprisingly this lead to a visit from the Black and Tans. Alice was in the front room with John Cloherty, leader of the local Volunteers when they saw the Tans approach up the avenue. They headed up Cashel Hill and were reconciled to spending the night there when found by the ever resourceful Katie Kelly who brought them to the comfort of her home.



Eddie Kelly, nephew, son of Patrick the poet; with Katie Kelly. In the background is the painting by Grace Gifford which is in a cell in Kilmainham. Grace who married Joseph Mary Plunkett in Kilmainham the night before his execution ended up imprisoned there herself in 1923 during the Civil War. It was the 11 year old Eddie who smuggled the paint into her when he visited her with his mother. Mary Kelly and Grace were both painters and also great friends. When Grace first received the Civil List Pension in 1932, there was a small sum in back pay included when the cheque arrived. Mary Kelly asked her what she was going to do with the money. To the two women who knew what it was to go without it was indeed a wind fall. “Myself and yourself are off to Paris”, said Grace and indeed that’s how they blew the money visiting the museums and doing sketches around Paris. (Photo Pat Keane)


Kempston Lily (Married name AcAlerney moved to Seattle, U.S.A.)


Keogh Edward Patrick. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1896 died on the 29th of May 1957, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Portobello Barracks, Rathmines, Royal College of Surgeons and Saint Stephen's Green areas. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until 1916. He re-joined the Irish Citizen Army upon release before transferring to F Company, in 1919 he took part in armed patrols and later was involved in the attempted burning of Chapelizod Barracks where the company came under fire from British forces. He was on armed patrol during the Teeling escape from Kilmainham and in March 1921 he was involved in the raid for armour plating at Inchicore Works. He was involved in an armed exchange with British forces at Red Cow and that he was an armed guard at Chapelizod Hall and Hibernian Bank, Thomas Street. During the Truce Period 12th  July 1921 to the  30th  June 1922, he was in the Four Courts and Kilmainham Jail. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was involved in the takeover of Stanley Street and in the attempted destruction of bridge at Bohernabreena. He was arrested in October 1922 and took part in the hunger strike before being released in November 1923.


Keogh James


King Martin. Irish Citizen Army. Served in the Winter Gardens, Royal College of Surgeons and Stephen’s Green areas. He was interned until August 1916 and emigrated to Scotland in 1919.


Lambert J.


Lawlor Patrick J. Commandant. Joined the National Army after the Truce. Took part in the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed.


Leddy Peter


Little James


Luke Edward


McArt Daniel


McCormick Richard


McDonnell William. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1877 died on the 21st of November 1938, aged about 39 years old during the Rising. Fought in Saint Stephen's Green, Fumbally Lane, Jacob's Biscuit Factory Bishop Street, Royal College of Surgeons Saint Stephen's Green and the Turkish Baths Saint Stephen's Green. Detained and deported after the surrender first to Knutsford then Frongoch he was released on the 20th of July 1916. After his release from Frongoch he returned to Dublin then moved to Dundalk on the 14th of August 1916 where he was involved in Volunteers and I.R.A. activities. He did not take part in the Civil War.


McDonald John


MacGrath Peter P.


Maguire James


MacMahon J.


Mahon John


Mallin Michael. Citizen Army. Second in command of the Citizen Army and commander of the Stephen’s Green Garrison. Born in Dublin 1st of December 1874 executed for his part in the Rising on the 8th of May 1916. Had a narrow escape from death when he dashed out one of the gates of the Green in order to rescue a wounded man under a hail of machine=gun fire, a bullet passed through his hat about an inch above the rim.


Mannering E.


Markievicz Constance (Countess). Convicted by Court Martial on the 6th of May and sentenced to death, commuted by the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief to penal servitude for life.


Monks Andrew


Moore May nee Wisely. Fairview Branch Attached to 2nd Battalion, Cumann na mBan. Served in the Royal College of Surgeons, Saint Stephen’s Green and the Turkish Baths Saint Stephen’s Green areas. She joined Cumann na mBan well before 1916 and she held the rank of Captain from 1917 for a couple of years after which she dropped out. She was mobilised on Easter Sunday and she was imprisoned from 30 April to 10 May 1916. During Easter Week, she was involved in helping with the food and carrying ammunitions. It is noted that she resigned in March 1919.



Murphy Fred


Murray Daniel, Killed in Action.


Nicholls Harry. Staff Officer 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers.


O'Briain Liam born in Dublin in 1888, died in 1974, after his early education he entered the Old Royal University of Ireland. In 1911 he was awarded a travelling studentship which enabled him to study the golden age of Celtic Studies at Berlin, Bonn and Freiburg and later study for a time in Paris where he returned for many visits during his life.

In 1914 he returned to Dublin and was appointed to the staff of University College Dublin as a lecturer in French. He joined the Irish Volunteers in and fought in St. Stephen's Green during the 1916 Easter Rising after which he was imprisoned until September, 1917. On his release he became Professor of Romance Languages at University College, Galway.

He stood as a Sinn Féin candidate for Mid-Armagh in the 1918 General Election but was defeated, he received 6000 votes to his unionist opponents 8000 odd. In the same year he was imprisoned in Belfast for republican activities. On his release in February 1920 he became a Sinn Féin judge in County Galway until his arrest and internment in November 1920. He was released in December 1921 and resumed his Professorship at UCG. He took the Treaty side in the Civil War.

In 1928 he became Director of An Taibhdearc, the Galway based Gaelic language Theatre Company and in 1931 he was elected President of the Company. Throughout the 1930's and 1940's Liam he translated numerous English, French and Italian dramas into Irish for production by An Taibhdearc.

His services in the cause of good relations between Ireland and France were recognised in 1951 when the French Government made him a chevalier of the Legion of Honour. In the same year he published a book of his recollections of 1916, Cuimhní Cinn. he was a member of the Irish Censorship Appeals Board from 1951-1968 and retired from Galway University in 1958.


O'Brien Francis (Frank). Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 15th of December 1957, aged about 21 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green.  He was seriously wounded on Monday the 24th of April in St. Stephen's Green when the car he was a passenger in was fired on accidently by his own men. As a result he was hospitalised and detained for some months and unable to renew his activities until 1918. He was involved in the procurement of arms and munitions for the IRA during the War of Independence. In April 1921 he was suspended from the IRA for refusing to parade for the attempted rescue of Kevin Barry in late 1920. On the 16th of October 1922 during the Civil War he joined the National Army. He continued to serve with the Defence Forces until his retirement at the rank of Commandant on the 30th of September 1946.


O’Daly Nora. (Margaret Mary) Fairview Branch, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1883 died on the 25th of May 1943, aged about 33 years old during the Rising. She was involved in the Howth Gun-Running. She joined the Fairview Branch of Cumann na mBan in 1915. She reported to the College of Surgeons on Tuesday 25 April and was put in charge of the 1st Aid Section by Miss Ffrench-Mullen. She treated Margaret Skinnider among others. She was arrested on 30 April 1916 and was detained in Kilmainham for a week. Following the Rising she was involved in election work, and also served as a Republican High Court Justice, North City Courts.


O’Daly Mrs Bridget nee Murtagh


O’Doherty Michael. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 22nd of December 1919. He was hit by a rake of machine gun fire while on the roof of the College of Surgeons being hit at least twelve times. He lost an eye and the use of one arm and suffered from severe lung problems and was unable to work until the time of his death in 1919. Michael O'Doherty was 40 years old at the time of his death. He joined the Citizen Army in 1914. He is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery Dublin. He was arrested and detained after the Rising spending some time in Dublin Castle Hospital and then in Frongoch. He was released from Frongoch in August 1916.


O'Donoghue Henry Vincent. Doctor, Medical Officer 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1890 died on the 7th of September 1959, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. Joined the Volunteers in December 1916 at Dingle County Kerr. He was a medical student and soon after joining the Volunteers he came to Dublin where he qualified as a Medical Doctor in 1914. He was mobilised on Easter Monday morning by Liam Tannam and carrying his rifle he arrived at Stephen’s Green about 1pm. About 3am on the Tuesday he went to Dublin Castle to get some medical dressing to treat a wounded dispatch rider who had fallen off his bicycle, believing Dublin Castle was in the hands of the Volunteers he addressed the guard on the gate in Irish. He was arrested and detained in Stafford Jail England for about four weeks. He did not take part in the War of Independence. During the Truce and Civil war he was Medical Officer for the 5th Battalion, Kerry Number 1 Brigade where he treated several sick and injured in Annascaul. From 1914 to 1924 he was unable to gain employment as a Doctor due to being blacklisted for his Volunteer activities.


Ó Donnchadha Tomás (O’Donoghue O'Donohoe). Citizen Army and founder member of Fianna Éireann. Born in 1894 died on the 23rd of June 1957, aged about 22years old during the Rising. Fought at Liberty Hall and in Saint Stephen’s Green. After the Civil War he moved to England and became the Very Reverend Father Thomas O’Donoghue Parish Priest of Saint Joseph’s, Rawmarsh, Yorkshire, England. During the War of Independence he was involved in organising the Fianna. Took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and commanded the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed.


O’Kelly Michael


O’Leary David, Kimmage Garrison.


O'Neill John. Captain, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1871 died on the 26th of November 1923, aged about 45 years old during the Rising. Fought at the Royal College of Surgeons on Saint Stephen's Green. He was deported after the surrender and released from Frongoch at Christmas 1916. He was imprisoned in Mountjoy from July 1922 to October 1922. He took the Anti-Treaty side during the Civil War and took part in the defence of the Hammam Hotel. His death was not attributed to military service. He served during the Boer War. His son James O’Neill aged 19 was killed in Clashmealcon Cave County Kerry while serving with the National Army, several Anti Treaty troops were holed-up in the cave refusing to surrender. John O’Neill’s date of is Birth recorded on the Pension Applications as 1886.



O’Neill Tim (Jim)


O’Reilly Joseph


O’Reilly Patrick


O’Shea Robert. Took part in the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed.


William Partridge

Partridge William. Staff Captain Stephen’s Green Command Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1874 died on the 26th of July 1917, aged about 42 years old during the Rising. He was employed as an organiser for the Irish Transport and General Workers Union at the time of the Rising. Took part in the attack on the Russell Hotel in which Freddie Ryan was killed and returned with Countess Markievicz to recover his body. Sentenced to 15 years penal servitude, 5 years remitted. He was released from detention early due to ill health, he died from Bright’s Disease (a kidney disease) in 1917.


Poole Christopher. Captain (2nd in command of the Stephen’s Green Garrison), Irish Citizen Army. Fought in Saint Stephen’s Green and College of Surgeons. Born on the 25th of December 1875 died on the 27th of November 1965, aged 40 years old at the time of the Rising. He was deported after the surrender, first to Stafford and then Frongoch, he was released at Christmas 1916. He remained with the Citizen Army up to 1919 and was involved in securing arms for a ship from the U.S.A.


Poole Patrick. Citizen Army. Born in 1877 died on the 29th of December 1966, aged about 39 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was deported after the surrender, he was released from Frongoch at Christmas Eve 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army on release and took part in activities up to about 1921. He had no further service after 1921. His brothers Christopher and Vincent, and his sons John and Patrick also served during the Rising.


Reynolds Augustus Percival. (Percy, Augustine). Adjutant General, Fianna Éireann. Born on the 29th of August 1895 died on the 4th of March 1983, aged 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Jacob's Biscuit Factory, Bishop Street, Royal College of Surgeons, Saint Stephen's Green and the Turkish Baths, Saint Stephen's Green areas. He was editor and manager of the Fianna newspaper which was published monthly. On Easter Monday he sent a telegram from the GPO to Major McBride recalling him to the city. He also mobilised men for his father's company of the Irish Volunteers. Following the Easter Rising was interned until September 1916. On his release he moved to Belfast for nine months before his return to Dublin. Due to poor health he took no active part thereafter.


Robbins Frank. member of the Citizen Army, hoisted the Tricolour on the Collage of Surgeons and remained in the building until the Surrender. He was interned in Knutsford, Wandsworth and Frongoch. Frank Robbins died in 1979 aged 83, he was a prominent member of the Trade Union movement, he was a member of the Irish Transport and General Workers Union from 1911 and a official of the Union from 1922 until his retirement in 1960. He was a founder member of the Cinema and Theatre Benevolent Society of Ireland. His book on the Easter Rising ‘Under The Starry Sky’ was published in 1977.


Ryan Frederick, Killed in Action.


Ryan Margaret


Seery John. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1863 died on the 8th of June 1943, aged about 53 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Saint Stephen’s Green and the Royal College of Surgeons. He was deported after the surrender, on the 1st of May he was sent to Stafford Jail where he remained until about the 26th of June and then sent to Frongoch were he remained until the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army after release and served throughout the War of Independence. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Shannon Martin


Skinnider Margaret.



Tuke Edward. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1896 died on the 2nd of May 1960, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Saint Stephen’s Green area. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Knutsford and Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch in December 1916. He joined Óglaigh na hÉireann in July 1922 serving as a Non Commissioned Officer in the Pipe Band attached to Portobello Barracks.