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The list below is made up of those who signed the 1966 Roll of Honour, information compiled by the department of defence relating to the recipients of the 1916 medal, the Roll of Honour compiled in 1936 and presented to President de Valera and names submitted to me relatives of those who took part. If your relative took part in the 1916 Rising and their name is not included on the list below please let me know, please send a scan of some sort of proof of their participation such as Pension Application, Medal Award, Newspaper Article which directly relates to their involvement.


 General Post Office, O’Connell Street

Adrien Mary (Molly Adrien). Molly Adrien was born into a well to do professional family at Kilbrecktown, Co. Meath. Her father and grandfather were both medical doctors. The family moved to Balbriggan. Molly was educated in Loreto Convent, Balbriggan, and in Surbiton, England, and she may have gone to France for a year. She became a staunch Nationalist and joined Cumann na mBan and did great work during the 1916 Rising. She delivered despatches from Patrick Pearse in the G.P.O. to the commandant of the Fingal Brigade Thomas Ashe. Her house was used as a safe refuge for the I.R.A. on the run. She died in 1949 and is buried at Crickstown Cemetery, near Curragha on the borders of Meath and Dublin. There is a plaque to her memory in Oldtown. It reads Mary Adrien and Comrades, Late Old I.R.A., Fingal Brigade, 1916 – 1921.

 

Agnew Arthur P, Kimmage Garrison. Member of the I.R.B. and Irish Volunteers in Liverpool and F Company Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Joined the I.R.B. in Liverpool in 1910 Bootle (Nicholl) Branch, his grandfather had been Centre of the Liverpool I.R.B., joined the Liverpool Irish Volunteers in 1914. In March 1916 he received his calling-up notice from the British Army, left Liverpool and came to Dublin, he was posted to the Kimmage Garrison. On Easter Monday morning he marched to Harolds Cross and boarded a tram for the city under the command of Plunkett who insisted on paying for the tram tickets. On arriving at the G.P.O. he was posted to guard O’Connell Bridge at the North end from Hopkins Corner to Kelly’s Corner, orders were to stop any British troops crossing the bridge. On Wednesday due to heavy fire they were ordered to retreat to the G.P.O. After an unsuccessful attempt to re-occupy Kelly’s on Thursday he spent Thursday and Friday in the Metropole Hotel, on Friday he received instructions to evacuate the Hotel and return to the G.P.O. On returning to the G.P.O. he joined the general evacuation to Moore Street where he remained until the Surrender. After grounding arms on the western side of O’Connell Street he spent the night on the open ground at the Rotunda and on Sunday morning marched to Richmond Barracks for interrogation. From Richmond Barracks he was taken to the North Wall and put on a cattle boat for Holyhead and then to Stafford Jail. In July he was transferred to Frongoch and released at Christmas 1916. During the War of Independence he served as Brigade Quartermaster, Antrim & East Down Brigade Irish Volunteers and IRA. He was responsible for supply of transport and material for various operations including attacks on R.I.C. Barracks at Ballinahinch, Crossgar, and Victoria Square, Belfast as well as an attack on RIC personnel at Broadway, Belfast and the killing of RIC District Inspector Oswald Ross Swanzy in Lisburn, County Antrim on the 22nd of August 1920. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Barry Leslie Mary. (Price, Maire Leslie Bean de Barra). Attached to 1st Battalion,  Ard Craobh Branch (Central Branch),  Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1893, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Served at the Hibernian Bank O'Connell Street and at the G.P.O. She joined Cumann na mBan in 1914 and was mobilised on Good Friday 1916 and on the Monday was mobilised for Mountjoy Street and then was sent to the GPO and the Hibernian Bank. She carried dispatches between the GPO and Church street and King Street area. She was arrested on the Friday as some Cumann na mBan members were leaving the GPO. She was held at  Broadstone Station and  released on the same afternoon. Following this, she rendered service in North County Dublin. She was elected to the Cumann na mBan Executive in 1917, became Director of Organisation and travelled the country in order to recruit members. Between 1918 and 1921, she organised units in each of the battalion and connected each branch with the local IRA units, organised first-aid classes, despatch systems, She remained a member of the Executive and continued her work until the 1921 Convention. She was then active in Cork but came back to Dublin before the start of the Civil War. She took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War reporting to Oscar Traynor at Barry's Hotel on the morning of the attack on the Four Courts.


Begley David Timothy. E Company (Kimmage Garrison) 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He joined the Irish Volunteers in London in 1915,he came to Dublin in January 1916. He was captured after the surrender and deported to Stafford Jail and then to Frongoch.  He continued Volunteers activities after release until he returned to London due to bad health about April 1920. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Behan James. “B” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1898 died on the 8th of February 1954, aged about 18 years old during the Rising. Fought in the O’Connell Street and Moore Street areas. He was detained at Richmond Barracks for about eight days after the Rising but was released due to his age (it is claimed he looked considerably younger that he was). James Behan was not a member of the Irish Volunteers and joined up at the outbreak of the Easter Rising on Monday 24 April 1916. He was arrested and interned from December 1920 to December 1921. His brother Michael Behan also took part in the Rising. he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Behan Michael. Aged about 23 years old during the Rising.


Bermingham Andrew J. 1st Battalion, “C” Company, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Mobilised on Easter Monday 1916 for Blackhall Place, but could not reach his Company, joining the forces at the G.P.O. instead. After the surrender, he was arrested and deported to Knutsford Prison on 1st May 1916, released at the end of July that year, was one of the firing party at Thomas Ashe's funeral, mobilised for attempted rescue of Kevin Barry in October 1920. Arrested by National Forces on 2 July 1922 during the Civil War having fought with anti-Treaty IRA forces at Hughes' Hotel, McArthur's and 44 Parnell Square, released after a few days detention at Mountjoy Prison, Dublin.


Bermingham John Joseph. 24 St Ignatius Road, Drumcondra, Dublin (address when mobilised for Easter Week, 1916). Volunteer, C Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Member of Irish Volunteers since its inception in 1913, separated from his unit on Easter Monday, 1916, prompting him to report alone to General Post Office, interned at Knutsford and Frongoch until July 1916, after which he re-joined his unit, resigning on health grounds in 1920. Involved in the Howth gun-running and O'Donovan Rossa funeral in 1915.


Billings Joseph Patrick. Volunteer, B Company, 2nd battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. He was 20 years old at the time of the Rising died on the 16th of December 1975, born in Dublin City and is listed on the 1911 census as living at 24 Bayview Avenue North Strand Dublin employed as an upholstery apprentice, speaks Irish and English. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Moore Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1915. He was deported after the surrender and served time in Knutsford and Frongoch and then Wandsworth, he was released on the 30th of July 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil war taking part in the fighting in Dublin for about ten day, he resigned due to personal reasons after ten days.


Bird Patrick. “E” Company 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 29 of November 1938, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Hibernian Bank O'Connell Street. He was not arrested or detained after the surrender. He served throughout the War of Independence, He did not take part in the Civil War.


Boland Edmund

 

Boland Henry James (Harry). Born in Dublin in 1887. Joined the I.R.B. in 1904. Joined the Irish Volunteers at the inaugural meeting in the Rotunda along with his brothers Gerry and Ned. Mobilised at Fairview Park on Easter Monday. On Monday his Company held a post a Gouldings Manure Works at Fairview Bridge and later in the day transferred to Gilbey’s Wine Merchant on the corner of Richmond Avenue where he remained until the Tuesday. On the Tuesday, along with his brother Ned and William Whelan, he took three Prisoners, three British Army Instructors from the Bull Wall, to the G.P.O. returning to Gilbey’s on Tuesday evening. One of these prisoners later identified him. By Wednesday Gilbey’s was being encircled by the British so the Garrison decided to evacuate to the G.P.O. on the Wednesday. He remained in the G.P.O. until the evacuation. He was court martialled and sentenced to ten years penal servitude with five years remitted. He was held in Mountjoy and them sent to Dartmoor Prison and then transferred to Lewis Jail. He took part in several protests in Lewis Jail to gain prisoner of war status and was transferred to Maidstone Prison where he served time with de Valera. He fought throughout the War of independence. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War. He died on Tuesday the 2nd of August 1922 in St. Vincent’s Hospital Dublin from gunshot wounds he received when attempting to escape capture by Free State Troops on Monday night in the Grand Hotel Skerries. As with all these type of shooting during the Civil War there are allegations that he was executed by the Free State Troops.

 

Boland Michael. “E” Company 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. He was appointed Captain during Easter Week. Born in 1876, about 40 years old at the time of the Rising. He died on the 11th of November 1942, his age given on the death certificate as 65 years old. He was interned after the Rising, released in December 1916.

Bolger John. (Seán Bolger, Seán Ua Búilghuidir). Volunteer, Kimmage Garrison (Liverpool Irish Volunteers), Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 17th of November 1974, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and North Circular Road Bridge areas. He was deported after the surrender being detained in Stafford Prison and Frongoch. He was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He was a member of the Wexford Brigade from 1917 to 1920, he did not serve during the War of Independence. On the 16th of February 1923 he joined the Marine Investigation Department (Coastal and Marine Services) where he remained until being demobbed on the 6th of March 1924. He served as an inspector Area 2 District 4.


Bourke David J. (Dáití de Burca). Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1890 died on the 28th of July 1978, aged about 26 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Reis's Building, the Hibernian Bank and the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He arrived in Dublin from Limerick on the Wednesday before the Rising and stayed with the Kimmage Garrison at Plunkett’s house. He was arrested after the surrender and deported to Knutsford, he was released sometime at the end of July or beginning of August. After release he returned to Limerick and joined the Volunteers there, he served through the War of Independence and served as Battalion Officer Commanding and later served with the Cork Flying Column. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was a member of several Flying Columns. He was arrested in Limerick in September 1922 and detained at the Curragh and Harepark until about May or June 1923.


Boylan John. Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 9th March 1941. Fought at Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Dublin. He was part of a group of Volunteers brining supplies from Father Matthew Park to the G.P.O. on the Tuesday of the Rising. As the party approach Annesley Bridge they came under heavy fire from British forces and were forced to disperse. Appears to have had no further service.  


Bracken Joseph. B Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1882 died on the 9th of March 1968, aged about 34 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers at their inception in 1913. He was deported after the surrender, he was released from Frongoch on the 29th of August 1916. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Bracken Peadar, Kimmage Garrison. Born in 1887 and died on the 19th of January 1961, he was about 29 years old during the Rising. Took part in the fighting in Kelly's Gun & Ammunition Shop, O'Connell Street, Bachelor's Walk, Middle Abbey Street, Prince's Street, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Moore Street. He was detained after the Rising until June.

From August  1915 Bracken served as Commandant of the Athlone Brigade, Irish Volunteers. He went on the run following a confrontation at the Sinn Fein rooms in Tullamore on 20 March 1916 during which he shot and wounded RIC Sergeant Aherne. Mobilised his Brigade on 23 April but following receipt of Eoin MacNeill's countermanding order he went to Dublin and took part in the fighting there. At the Irish Volunteer conventions in December  1916 Bracken was elected to the Executive of the Irish Volunteers on which body he served until 1921. From 1918, until March 1920 when he was appointed as an organiser for parts of counties Tipperary, Offaly and Kildare by General Headquarters IRA, Peadar Bracken served as Commandant of the Offaly Brigade. In October 1920 he organised a general attacks on RIC personnel in the Offaly 1st  Brigade area in response to death of Terence McSwiney and to have taken part in an ambush of British forces at Raheen, Geashill, County Offaly. Bracken was arrested in March 1921 and interned at Rath Camp until escaping on 1 October the same year. Following his escape Bracken joined the Home Affairs Department of Dáil Éireann helping to organise Republican Courts in counties Westmeath, Meath, Offaly and Kildare. At the outbreak of the Civil War in July 1922 Bracken unsuccessfully attempted to secure arms for use in fighting against National Army forces in county Offaly after which took no further part in that conflict.


Brady Michael. Lieutenant, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 17th of November 1868 died on the 22nd of May 1954, aged 47 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Moore Street and William’s on Henry Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. Convicted by Court Martial on the 8th of May and sentenced to death, commuted by the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief to 3 years penal servitude he was imprisoned in Dartmoor Lewis and on the Isle of White, he was released in June 1917. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.


Breen Liam


Brennan James Michael. (O'Braonáin, Séamus Micheál). Captain, Kimmage Garrison, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 20th of February 1968. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Lane. He joined the Volunteers in Tullamore in 1914. Just before the Rising he was involved in an incident in Tullamore in which an R.I.C. man was shot, he had to leave the area and came to Dublin where he stayed with the Kimmage Garrison. He was arrested after the surrender and deported, he was released in June 1916. On his return he was involved in Volunteers work and also heavily involved in political work. He was imprisoned on several occasions and was on hunger strike while detained in Wormwood Scrubs. He did not take part in the War of Independence.


Brennan-Whitmore William James.  General Staff Officer, General Headquarters, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 27th of December 1977, aged about 30 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., North Earl Street and in O’Connell Street. Served on the staff of Joseph Plunkett and following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising he was interned until December 1916. He was also imprisoned from May 1918 to January 1919. During the War of Independence he was involved in organising, training, intelligence gathering, operational planning and the manufacture of explosives and was officer in command of North Wexford Brigade Active Service Unit in the months immediately preceding Truce. Involved in Pro-Treaty political activity during the Truce Period he was arrested and held for three days by anti-Treaty forces in Gorey, County Wexford following an election rally in that town at which he spoke in the first half of 1922. He returned to military activity at the outbreak of the Civil War in July 1922 and participated in reoccupation by National Army of Enniscorthy, Ferns and Gorey in County Wexford from anti-treaty IRA forces, he did not officially join the National Army until 9 July 1922.


Brooks Christina, nee Stafford. Ard Craobh Branch (Central Branch), Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1881 died on the 27th of April 1950, aged about 35 years old during the Rising. Served in the Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street/Lower Abbey Street and Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street areas. She was very active in Cumann na mBan from 1914 until 1923 when she was arrested on the 17th March 1923 on North Brunswick Street, carrying arms. She was interned and during her imprisonment her health deteriorated she suffered from lameness, loss of sight and deafness. The Medical Board examined the claimant and concluded that she was suffering from a sciatica and paralysis of left upper eyelid.


Brophy Daniel. Lieutenant “A” Company 5th Battalion (Fingal) Irish Volunteers Born 1892 died 25th of February 1961 aged about 24 during the Rising. During the Rising he fought in Finglas, Blanchardstown, Bachelors Walk, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Moore Street. After the Rising he saw service during the War of Independence, Truce Period and Civil War for the entirety of the period between 1 April 1916 and 30 September 1923. Following his participation in the 1916 Rising Daniel Brophy was interned until July 1916. From 1917 until his capture arrest in December 1920, Brophy served as a Battalion Quartermaster, Brigade Officer Commanding and Brigade Staff Officer with the Irish Volunteers and IRA. During this period, according to reference from Joseph Lawless, there was a degree of conflict within the Fingal Brigade IRA in 1920 with Daniel Brophy and others, in opposition to the then Brigade Officer Commanding, arguing for greater activity on behalf of the Brigade against British forces. According, also to Lawless, Brophy was responsible for the capture and killing of a spy following the attack on the town of Balbriggan by British forces in the wake of the killing of an RIC Head Constable Peter Burke there in September 1920. Following his release in December 1921 Daniel Brophy first joined the IRA Dublin Brigade Active Service Unit and then the National Army serving with the Dublin Guards during the Civil War. Daniel Brophy continued to serve with the Defence Forces until his resignation in September 1924.

 

Brophy Thomas. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1899 died on the 27th of June 1932, aged about 17 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Fairview, the G.P.O. and the Imperial Hotel on O’Connell Street. He was not arrested or captured after the surrender.  He served throughout the War of Independence and was appointed to the Intelligence Office in November 1921. He enlisted in the National Forces at Oriel House on the 7th of February 1922 and resigned on the 14th of April 1923 at the rank of Lieutenant Army number 3944.


Bryan Thomas. (Thomas Brien). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 1st of January 1875 died on the 2nd of January 1956, aged 41 years old during the Rising. Fought at Fleet Street, Westmoreland Street, the Imperial Hotel, the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was captured after the surrender and was deported to Stafford Jail, he was released on the 4th of August 1916. He remained with the Citizen Army for a while after his release, he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.  


Bulfin Eamonn. Lieutenant Rathfarnham Company Irish Volunteers. A native of Birr County Offaly He was the second pupil to enter St. Enda’s School in September 1908, the school was then on Oakley Road Ranelagh. He joined the I.R.B. in 1912, Fianna Circle Con Colbert was centre, and later that year he proposed P H Pearse for membership which was accepted. He joined the Irish Volunteers when they started. Before the Rising he took part in the manufacture of munitions at St. Enda’s. On Easter Monday morning he received mobilisation orders signed by Pearse which instructed him to mobilise the Rathfarnham Company and proceed to Liberty Hall. The Company mobilised outside Rathfarnham Church, about 20out of a total strength of 35 mustered. From Liberty Hall the Company proceeded to the G.P.O. gaining entry through a window on Prince’s Street. He was posted to the roof of the G.P.O. where he remained until Wednesday afternoon. After a short rest on Wednesday he maintained and erected barricades on the ground floor of the G.P.O. at the Prince’s Street end. On Friday he took part in the evacuation to Moore Street where he remained until the surrender on Saturday. He was detained on the grass outside the Rotunda overnight on Saturday and on Sunday marched to Richmond Barracks and from there to Stafford Jail and on the Frongoch.

 

Burke Bartholomew. (Bart). Volunteer, E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 1st of July 1882 died on the 21st of December 1955, aged 33 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Moore Lane. He joined the Volunteers on the 28th of December 1913. He was deported after the surrender and released from Frongoch in December 1916. He lost his job at Rathfarnham Golf Club as a result of his involvement in the Rising. He re-joined his company immediately after his release from Frongoch and served throughout the War of Independence and was involved in activities including raids for arms, armed patrols, burning of RIC barracks as well as the making of arms dumps and training and instruction of his Company. He reported to Wellington Barracks, Dublin in May 1922 and served with the National Forces in Dublin in fighting against Anti-Treaty I.R.A. forces following the outbreak of the Civil War on the 28th of June. He was not formally attested into the National Army until October 1922. He continued to serve with the Defence Forces until his discharge time expired on the 21st of April 1924 at the rank of Private service number 38325.


Burke David. A Marconi Radio Operator, Operated the Radio in the Wireless School until the Wednesday afternoon of the Rising, due to heavy shelling from the Helga the position had to be abandoned.

Burke Frank. (Fergus de Burca). “E” Company 4th Battalion (Pearse’s Own) Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. In 1909 he was a border in St. Enda’s and remained with the school when it moved to The Hermitage in Rathfarnham in 1910. After gaining a place in Dublin University in 1912 he remained at The Hermitage, it was about 1912 when he joined the I.R.B. He joined the Irish Volunteers at the Rotunda in 1913. His Company mobilised at Rathfarnham Church on Easter Monday at 10am, about 37 Volunteers mustered, they travelled by the number 17 tram as far as the Bank of Ireland when gun-fire caused to driver to abandon the tram. They marched to Liberty Hall where they were ordered to the G.P.O. His first post was on the roof of the G.P.O. under the Tri-Colour at the Prince’s Street corner. He remained at his post on the roof until Wednesday when he was posted to the ground floor. By mid-day on Thursday the fires around the G.P.O. had become serious, the fires now extended from Clery’s down to Hopkins Corner and from the Metropole Hotel down to O’Connell Bridge, although the G.P.O. had not yet caught fire it was only a matter of time before it did. He remained at the G.P.O. until the evacuation to Moore Street and was part of a group ordered to charge the Barricades and was waiting for the word to go when the surrender was announced. He was detained overnight on the grass at the Rotunda and the next day taken to Richmond Barracks. He was transferred to the North Wall and put on board a cattle boat and sent to Stafford Jail.

Burke Nicholas. Private Hibernian Rifles, born on the 24th of September 1896 died on the 23rd of February 1963, aged 19 at the time of the Rising. He fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Dublin Evening Mail Newspaper Office, Smith & Weldon's Ironmongers, and Parliament Street. He was arrested by the British Army outside the Telephone Exchange on Crown Alley on Tuesday 25 April while trying to make his way back to the General Post Office and was released on Sunday 30 April on account of his age, he claimed he was under 16 years old.


Byrne Catherine . (Catherine Rooney) Joined the Central Branch of Cumann na mBan early in 1915, she was 20 years old. She was the first Cumann na mBan woman to enter the G.P.O. on Easter Monday. Her sister Alice and their older brother Patrick Byrne (Paddy) also took part in the Rising. Catherine served in the G.P.O. throughout the week. On the Monday night she was sent to the Hibernian Bank to prepare food the Garrison there, she returned to the G.P.O. early Tuesday morning bring dispatches with her. Later on the Tuesday she was sent by Pearse to the Four Courts with dispatches which she concealed in her hair under her bonnet. Unable to return to the G.P.O. she spent the night in an armchair in a tenement, early next morning she went to King Street where she spent the rest of the week until the surrender. Her brothers John C, Peter S and Patrick J Byrne also fought in the G.P.O.


Byrne Christopher Columba. Volunteer, A Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 8th of February 1981, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O.  After the surrender he was deported to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released in August 1916. He took part in the Bloody Sunday operation and was arrested soon after, he was detained until December 1921. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army in May 1922 and served until March 1924 serving at the rank of Captain with the 16th Battalion, army number SDR200.

Byrne Edward, aged 15 he joined the Volunteers on Easter Monday at Father Matthew Park.

 

Byrne James. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1875 died on the 13th of April 1945, aged about 41 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He was deported after the surrender first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti Treaty side in the Civil War fighting at Barry's Hotel and Vaughan's Hotel, Rutland Square.


Byrne James. Fought at the G.P.O., he was not a member of the Volunteers at the time of the Rising but claimed to be a member of the I.R.B., he received a 1916 medal in 1958 and also stated he was deported to England after the Rising. There was no information relating to War of Independence or Civil War service.


Byrne John. (Sean). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1897 died on the 27th of February 1948, aged about 19 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Henry & James Outfitters Cork Hill, Liberty Hall, the G.P.O. the Imperial Hotel and Gloucester Street. He left his job three weeks before the Rising and went fulltime guarding the printing press at Liberty Hall. On the Friday of the Rising he was captured in a house on Gloucester Street, he was deported and interned first in Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released early in October 1916. He served with the Citizen Army up to 1922 taking part in the Belfast Boycott. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was involved in the fighting in Parnell Square.


Byrne John C. He was 15 years old at the time of the Rising and is recorded in the 1911 census as living at 17.3 Richmond Street North Mountjoy Dublin. Languages spoken not listed. His brothers Peter s. and Patrick J. Byrne and his sister Catherine Byrne (Rooney) also fought in the G.P.O. He went on to join the National Army and as a Captain was part of the colour party which took over Beggar's Bush Barracks from the British. He then went on to serve on the Pro Treaty side in the Civil War with A Co., 3 rd. Battalion The Dublin Guards and remained in the Army until 1929 and in the reserve until 1939.

 

Byrne Louis. Irish Citizen Army, Born in 1900, died on the 16th of August 1987, aged about 16 at the time of the Rising. Louis Byrne evaded arrest/capture following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising. Following the outbreak of the Civil War on 28 June 1922 Byrne took part in fighting against National Army forces in Dublin. On 22 August of that year he mobilised as part of the general anti-Treaty forces operation to destroy bridges in the Dublin area “night of the bridges". He subsequently served with Irregular forces in County Wicklow taking part in fighting against National Forces at Glenasmole Lodge. In March 1923 he was arrested and subsequently interned until December of that year.


Byrne Lucy Agnes (nee Smyth). Section Leader, Cumann na mBan, Ard Craobh Branch (Central Branch), Dublin Brigade. Born in 1882 died on the 14th of November 1972, aged about 34 years old during the Rising. Served in the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street and the General Post Office, O'Connell Street. Attached to the First Aid Detachments at the General Post Office. On Easter Monday she was on stand-by in Dominick Street awaiting orders when late in the evening she assisted in removing arms, ammunition and other Volunteer related material from a house in Hardwick Street. On the Tuesday she delivered dispatches around the City and on the Wednesday she was assigned to the G.P.O. where she remained until the Friday. On the Friday she assisted in removing the wounded from the GPO to Jervis Street Hospital, she remained with the wounded Friday night and was able to return home on the Saturday avoiding arrest or detention. She served with Cumann na mBan up to the end of the Truce beginning of the Civil War and was involved in the usual activities including first aid lectures and learning to shoot. She was in charge of the Inn’s Quay Ward of the Volunteer Dependent’s Fund and immediately after the Rising started raising and distributing funds to the families of the men detained after the Rising. She was also involved in organising concerts to raise funds to purchase arms. At the end of 1919 her house was raided by the Military resulting in the death of one of her infant children, about that time or shortly after her husband Tom Byrne was arrested and deported to Brixton Prison in England. She did not take part in the Civil War.  


Byrne Patrick Joseph. “C” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 9th of December 1966, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Employed as an Electrician before the Rising. Fought in the Cabra Bridge, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Moore Street areas. Fought through the War of Independence and Civil War, took the Pro-Treaty side. Was a member of the Dublin Metropolitan Police (Constable 151A) and Garda (Number 12008).  Acted as a stretcher bearer for James Connolly during Easter 1916. Transferred from the National Army to the C.I.D., based in Oriel House, Westland Row, Dublin, in July 1922. He served as Officer Commanding Transport with the C.I.D. until joining the Dublin Metropolitan Police (as part of the C.I.D.'s merger with that body) in October 1923. The C.I.D. was under the control of the Minister for Defence and its members paid from Army Funds until 21 August 1922 when it came under the jurisdiction of the Minister for Home Affairs. His brothers Peter S. and John C. Byrne and his sister Catherine Byrne (Rooney) also fought in the G.P.O.

 

Byrne Peter Sylvester. Captain “D” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade Fianna Éireann. Born December 1899 died 31st of August1959, aged about 16 at the time of the Rising. He was employed as an Apprentice Lithographer. Joined Fianna Éireann in 1913 and that he took part in the Howth gun running. Following the Easter Rising he was interned for fourteen days. Between 1917 and 1919 he was involved in training and organising Fianna Éireann in Dublin. In 1920 he held the rank of Commandant, he was involved in the kidnapping of members of the British forces and stealing their uniforms. In April 1920 he was appointed to serve with General Collins, where he continued to serve until March 1922. He rendered first aid to the men who were injured in Mount Street 21 November 1920 (Bloody Sunday). During the Civil War he enlisted in the National Forces at Amien Street and he resigned on 10 July 1922 as he had to return to hospital. He was appointed to the rank of Captain and was given charge of an armoured car and squad by General O'Daly and that he was involved in fighting at the Gresham Hotel and that he took part in raids for ammunition. His brother Patrick J and John C and his sister Catherine Byrne (Rooney) also fought in the Rising.


Byrne Thomas Francis. Mynooth Company, Kildare Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1877 died on the 7th of September 1962, aged about 39 years old during the Rising. He fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Parliament Street, Capel Street Bridge and Liffey Street areas. Thomas Byrne was one of a party of Maynooth Irish Volunteers who marched to Dublin to take part in the Easter Rising. He escaped after the Easter Rising and was not interned or imprisoned. From 1917 to early 1921 Byrne served successively as Vice Battalion Officer Commanding and Battalion Officer Commanding Irish Volunteers and IRA and then as a Staff Officer on the Dublin Brigade IRA. In 1919 he was interned for five months in Brixton Prison, London and was later again interned in 1921 at Rath Camp, The Curragh. Following the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 Thomas Byrne served as Officer in charge of a number of National Army positions in Dublin including the Technical Schools in Bolton Street, Davy's Public House in Portobello and King's Inns. He was appointed Captain of the Guard at Leinster House in September 1922 until his retirement in February 1947. Byrne had serviced under Major John McBride in the Boer War 1899-1900.

 

Caddell Patrick. From Lusk, arrived in the G.P.O. on Tuesday the 25th of April. “A” Company, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1882 died on the 23rd of April 1942, aged about 34 during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Kelly's Corner, O'Connell Bridge, Abbey Street, Moore Street and Rathmines areas. Subsequent internment at Knutsford and Frongoch until July 1916.


Caffrey John. Dublin Brigade, Fianna Eireann. Born in 1899 died on the 31st of October 1933. Fought at Liberty Hall and the G.P.O. Aged 15 years old at the time of the Rising. He died in 1933 as a result of the effects of a bullet wound he received to the left lung on Wednesday the 26th of April 1916 during the fighting at the G.P.O. He was treated at the Mater Hospital, the bullet wound caused severe haemorrhage and it was not possible to remove the bullet which was believed to be embedded in the liver. He was released from the Mater on the 26th of May 1916 his condition on discharge was described as fair. He served throughout the War of Independence and was a member of G Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade I.R.A. He was interned in Ballykinlar from November 1920 until sometime in 1921, he also served in the Civil War with the Anti-Treaty side.


Caffrey Matthew. E Company, 4ht Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born 27th of September 1882, died the 7th of August 1952, aged about 33 years old at the time of the Rising. Took part in the fighting in Rathfarnham, Liberty Hall, Beresford Place, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Marlborough Street, Dublin Bread Company, Westmoreland Street and Moore Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was deported after the surrender, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916, he lost his job as a result of his imprisonment. He re-joined the Company on reorganisation in 1917 and served throughout the War of Independence and was involved in reporting the activity of Crown Forces around the Rathfarnham area. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was involved in trenching roads and also help set up a temporary hospital in Rathfarnham.


Caldwell Patrick. Quartermaster, Kimmage Garrison. Went to work in Liverpool in August 1914. After reading about the split in the Irish Volunteers he joined the Liverpool Volunteers which at the time met in a house in Duke Street Liverpool, Frank Thornton was in charge of the Company and Thomas Craven was Lieutenant., in the summer of 1915 John P O’Hickey came over from Dublin and assumed the position as Lieutenant of the Company Craven became 2nd Lieutenant. Early in 1916 a disagreement arose over a mobilisation order and the three senior officers of the Company resigned. Thomas Craven became Captain and William McNeive and Seamus Donegan Lieutenants. After the Conscription Act came into force in England Craven became concerned over the position of the men under his command and ordered the Company to be ready for transfer to Dublin. On Easter Sunday morning accompanied by another Volunteer and a Glasgow man named Sandy Caldwell was detailed to go to de Selby Quarries Jobstown and commandeer gelignite, they left camp at the Mill Kimmage by taxi Thomas Craven and two brothers named Golden from the 2nd Battalion were already in the taxi and they set off to commander the gelignite. On arrival at the Quarry they were met by Martin Walsh and Patrick McDermott who had been living in a hut at the Quarry. A large quantity of gelignite was loaded and Caldwell remained behind to prevent the alarm being raised. On Easter Monday Caldwell paraded as ordered with the rest of the Kimmage Garrison, the parade numbered about sixty strong. After travelling by tram to O’Connell Street the Company marched to Liberty Hall. Under Section Commander Joe Gahan Caldwell was part of a small group which occupied the Ship Hotel after they failed to force entry into Mooney’s Public House in Abbey Street. After some time in the Ship Hotel the group was ordered to the G.P.O. and given various positions to defend in the building. After evacuating the G.P.O. he went to Moore Street until the surrender. He was held at the green plot next to the Rotunda overnight and on the Sunday morning marched under heavy escort to Richmond Barracks. He was then sent to Knutsford Jail and in late August transferred to Frongoch. He appeared before the Sankey Commission in London, he was released from Frongoch on Christmas Eve 1916. About three months after his return he gained employment with the Dublin Corporation.


Callan Joseph. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 16th of July 1960, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought at Lambe’s Public House Fairview Strand, the G.P.O., the Coliseum Variety Theatre Princes Street and Arnott's Department Store Henry Street. He was deported after the surrender first to Knutsford and then Frongoch, he was released in September 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and joined the National Army on the 8th of March 1922 and served up to September 1923.


Canny Daniel. (Dan) C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in County Clare he was 30 years old at the time of the Rising. Died on the 13th of April 1967. Fought at Annesley Bridge Fairview, the G.P.O., the Metropole Hotel and Moore Street. He was employed as a grocer’s assistant in Kennedy’s. He is recorded in the 1911 census as speaking Irish and English. He joined the Volunteers in 1915 having been a member of the I.R.B. for seven or eight years. He was deported after the surrender and sent first to Knutsford Jail then Frongoch, he was released about the end of July 1916. He lost his job on account of his imprisonment so he returned to Clare for a couple of months then came back to Dublin and re-joined the Volunteers. He served throughout the War of Independence and took no part in the Civil War.


Carmichael Bernard, also listed as Andrew. Part of the Kimmage Garrison. He was a carpenter by trade and was detained in Knutsford after the Rising.


Carney Maria Winifred (Winnie) Born 4th December 1887 died 21st of November 1943. Born in Bangor County Down. Was a Suffragette and trade unionist. Served throughout Easter Week in the G.P.O. and was the first woman to enter the building with the Rebels on Easter Monday. She was secretary for James Connolly and was said to have entered the G.P.O. with a typewriter in one hand and a Webley Revolver in the other. After the surrender she was detained in Kilmainham Jail and then in Aylesbury Prison. She was released in December 1916. 

Carney stood for Parliament as a Sinn Féin candidate for Belfast Victoria in the 1918 General Election. She polled 4.05% of the vote, losing to the Labour Unionists. In 1924 she joined the Labour Party. In 1928 she married George McBride, a Protestant Orangeman and former member of the Ulster Volunteers. She was also a member of the Irish Volunteers. McBride was however a fellow socialist. She continued to be involved in the trade union movement, working for the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union. Ill health limited her political activities in her later years. She is buried in Milltown Cemetery.


Carpenter Peter. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1897 died on the 17th of April 1984, aged about 18 at the time of the Rising. He was employed as a dockyard worker. Fought in the Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Prince's Street, Metropole Hotel and Moore Street areas, he was also part of the guard on Liberty Hall while the Proclamation was being printed. He was interned until December 1916, he re-joined the Citizen Army on his return to Dublin and was involved in defence of Liberty Hall on Armistice Night November 1918. He joined the I.R.A. in 1920 and left soon after the evacuation of the Four Courts in in June 1922. His brother Walter also fought in the G.P.O. In the 1911 census his father’s religion is stated as believer in the Doctrine of Christ not attached to any church, Peter's religion is stated as Irish Church. His father spoke Irish, it is not recorded that Peter spoke Irish.

 

Carpenter Walter Patrick. Captain, Boys Corps (Young Guard of Ireland), Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1895 died on the 18th of May 1970, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Served in the G.P.O. from the 24th to the 26th when he was ordered home by James Connolly because he was ill. He was a Captain in the I.C.A. Boys Corps from 1914 to 1917. He fought on the Anti-Treaty side in the Four Courts and was detained from June 1922 until December 1923. He was interned in Mountjoy, Gorman’s Town and Newbridge, he went on hunger strike for 11 days during his time of internment. His brother Peter also fought in the G.P.O. He is recorded on the 1911 census as an chimney sweep mate. He was born in Dublin. In the 1911 census his father’s religion is stated as believer in the Doctrine of Christ not attached to any church, Walter’s religion is stated as Irish Church. His father spoke Irish, it is not recorded that Walter spoke Irish.

 

Carrigan Charles Edward, Kimmage garrison, Killed in Action.

 

Carrigan James. “C” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born 1900 died on the 28th of March 1975, aged about 15 years old during the Rising. Employed in Pimms Department Store, Georges Street, Dublin at the time of the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, Hibernian Bank, Irish Independent Offices, Abbey Street, and Moore Street areas. He was a member of Fianna Eireann and was involved in the Howth Gun-Running on the 26th of July 1914. Was released after one week imprisonment following the Easter Rising on account of his age. During the War of Independence Carrigan served with Dublin Brigade IRA Transport and from January 1921 with the General Headquarters IRA Active Service Unit (the Squad). In 1920 James Carrigan participated in a number of IRA operations including, in 1920, the raid on Kings Inns, Henrietta Street, the attack on British Army personnel at Monks Bakery in Church Street and, acting as a driver for the attack against suspected British Intelligence operatives on 21 November on Bloody Sunday. After joining the Active Service Unit in 1921 he participated in the attack on the Custom House and in unsuccessful attempt to kill General Tudor as well as in a number of other attacks on British forces in Dublin. James Carrigan joined the National Army in February 1922 and served with the Transport Section of the Eastern Command during the Civil War until March 1923 when he transferred to the Marine Investigation Department with which he served until leaving the Defence Forces on the disbandment of that unit in December 1923.


Carroll Patrick. (Padraig O Cearbaill) Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 5th of April 1971. Fought in the Railway Station Harcourt Street, the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He joined the Irish Citizen Army in 1914. He was detained in Richmond Barracks for a week after the surrender being released due to his age, he was 18 years old during the Rising. He remained with the Citizen Army until about three weeks before the Truce when he transferred to C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin brigade, I.R.A. He took the Anti-Treaty side during the Civil War and maintained and managed an arms dump at 59 Capel Street. He was arrested on Good Friday night April 1st 1923 and detained until late October 1923.


Carroll Peter. Section Commander, C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 5th of May 1893 died on the 25th of September 1992, aged 22 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., North Earl Street and Cumberland Street. He joined the Volunteers in August 1914. He was detailed to mobilise for Saint Stephen’s Green but missed the mobilisation so went to the G.P.O. He was captured in the early hours of the Friday morning while attempting to escape from the Imperial Hotel, he was first taken to Richmond Barracks then deported first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released in July 1916. He remained with his Company up to late 1918. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Cassels James. “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 30 of April 1895 died on the 14th of August 1934, aged 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. Served in the National Army during the Civil War from 1st of July 1922 and 30th of September 1923, service number 8032. Following the 1916 Easter Rising Cassels' was interned until August of that year. During the War of Independence he took part in raids for munitions at the North Wall. He was interned in Ballykinlar camp between November 1920 and December 1921. Discharged from the Defence Forces on 2 February 1924 at the rank of Private.

 

Cassidy James Philip. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1878 died on the 5th of May 1938, aged about 38 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He was a Drapers assistant in Cavan in early 1914 when he joined the Volunteers there losing his job over the split in the Volunteers. He surrendered on the Friday night of the Rising and was taken to Richmond Barracks on the Saturday and deported to Stafford on the Sunday, he was transferred to Frongoch being released in December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers and at the end of 1917 his employment took him to Arklow where he helped set up a Volunteer company. He was arrested in July 1918 and sentenced to 12 months which he served at Mountjoy Jail, Belfast Prison and Strangeways, Manchester. Released in July 1919. During the War of Independence he took part in armed street patrols. He did not take part in the Civil War but in December 1921 he moved to Cookstown, County Tyrone where he was arrested in September 1922 and detained for 3 months.


Chadwick Mrs. Mary. (Nee Kelly) South County Dublin Cumann na mBan and Hibernian Rifles Served in the e General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Jacob's Biscuit Factory and Bishop Street. Born in 1901 and died on the 31st of March 1964 aged about 15 at the time of the Rising. Service with the Clan na Gael and Hibernian Rifles between Sunday 23 April 1916 and March 1917 and with Cumann na mBan from July 1921 to September 1923. Held the ranks of Captain from 1916 to 1918 and then Commandant from 1918 to 1919 of Clan-na-Gael Girl Scouts, attached to the Hibernian Rifles until 1919, until the Hibernian Rifles were disbanded. Formed Clan na Gael Girl Scouts previously known as National Girl Scouts in 1915 as she held the rank of Captain, with the help of Seamus McGowan. Date at which, the organisation linked up with the Hibernian Rifles. She was mobilised for Easter Sunday. She spent Monday night in the G.P.O. and was in Jacob's Factory from Tuesday to the surrender. She was arrested in August 1916 while parading to Glasnevin with other girls. She also was involved in the forming of Clan-na-Gael branches in Cork (Douglas and Blackpool) and in Athlone. Although she continued her activities with Clan-na-Gael, she joined Cumann na mBan in 1919. During the War of Independence, she formed scout parties to obtain addresses of houses visited by the RIC and the information was then transferred to the Director of Intelligence. She was a member of the garrison based at the Gresham Hotel O'Connell Street during the defence of that building in 1922, also was present at the CYMS (Frederick Street) and Healys of Parnell Street. She was arrested on Easter Sunday 1923 and was taken to Oriel House and was then transferred to Kilmainham and to the Dublin South Union. She was released sometime in October. She subsequently lost her position in Forrest's, of Grafton Street where she had worked for some years.

 

Clarke Liam. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 13th of August 1941, aged about 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. Joined the Volunteers in 1913 and took part in the landing of arms and ammunition Howth and Kilcoole in 1914. Was seriously injured in an accidental explosion in the G.P.O. during the Rising on the Monday when a home-made hand grenade he was carrying exploded. He was treated by Catherine Byrne Cumann na mBan who reported he was bleeding profusely from a head wound which she washed and dressed before he was removed to the First Aid Station at Father Matthew Hall. As a result of the explosion he lost an eye. He was not arrested or captured after the Rising, he had to go on the run from hospital after Crown Forces raided the hospital looking for him.  After the Rising he was involved in the reorganisation of the Irish Volunteers nationally. He served as Company and Battalion commanding officer during the War of Independence and later on the staff of Cathal Brugha. He was imprisoned by the British from May to December 1921. In July 1922, he took the Anti-Treaty side during the Civil War and became Brigade Officer Commanding of number 2 Brigade Dublin  I.R.A. following the capture of much of that brigade's staff at Blessington, County Wicklow. He captured by National Army troops in September 1922 and was imprisoned until September 1923 in Newbridge, the Curragh and at Mountjoy Prison.


Clarke Thomas J. Commandant, Irish Volunteers. Executed by firing squad, Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin.


Clinch Patrick Joseph, Kimmage Garrison. Born in 1889 in Crossmaglen, county Armagh, died on the 12th of February 1978, aged about 27 at the time of the Rising. During the Rising he fought in the Liberty Hall, Beresford Place, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Annesley Bridge, Fairview, McDowell's Jewellers, Henry Street, Moore Street and Moore Lane areas. Clinch joined the Irish Volunteers in 1914 which he joined while living in Liverpool, England. Clinch travelled to Ireland in early 1916 and joined the Irish Volunteers based at Larkfied, Kimmage and later at the Ancient Order of Hibernians, American Alliance Hall on North Frederick Street in Dublin. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising during which he was wounded, Patrick Joseph Clinch was interned until December of that year. After release Clinch was involved in organisational work with the Irish Volunteers in counties Louth and Meath from 1917 to 1919 and took part in an attack on Lismullen (Dillonsbridge) RIC Barracks in 1919. From 1919 to the end of the War of Independence in 1921 Clinch was involved in Republican Police and Republican Courts work as well as serving as a Sinn Fein representative on Meath County Council and other local government bodies. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War but his activities appear to be limited to providing a safe house of on the run Anti-Treaty Volunteers.


Coade Seán. Not a member of any organisation but joined F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers after the Rising. He served in the G.P.O. for the whole of Easter Week. He was detained at Richmond Barracks for a short while after the surrender, he was not deported due to being considered under age. He served with the Volunteers until his death due to illness on the 20th of July 1919. Born in 1897 he was about 19 years old at the time of the Rising.


Coate John

 

Cole Sean. Born in 1897 died on the 28th of May 1981 aged about 18 at the time of the Rising. Fought in Keegan's Gun shop, Chancery Street and the Four Courts, King's Inns Quay areas. He was employed as a Carter before the Rising. Thomas Cole was not a member of any organisation before or during the 1916 Easter Rising, he avoided detention after the Rising by claiming he was under 16 years of age. During the Rising he assisted in the removal of arms and ammunition from Keegan's Gun shop and generally assisted the Four Courts garrison before being advised to leave prior to a major British attack on the post. In 1917 he joined the Irish Volunteers and from then till the end of the War of Independence was primarily engaged in the procuring - mainly from British military sources - movement and storage of arms for the Irish Volunteers and IRA. At the outbreak of the Civil War in Dublin on 28 June 1922 Thomas Cole took part in fighting against National Army forces in the city. In October 1922 he took part in sniping attacks on Mountjoy Prison and in November of that year took part in an attack on the offices of the Irish Independent newspaper.


Colgan Patrick. (Padraic O' Colgain). Volunteer, Maynooth Company, Kildare Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1890 died on the 15th of September 1960, aged about 26 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Royal Exchange Hotel on Parliament Street, Middle Abbey Street, Liffey Street and Coliseum Variety Theatre on Princes Street. He was deported after the surrender, first to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. After release he organised the Volunteers in County Kildare establishing of lines of communication between Dublin and Mullingar Volunteers. In 1918 he became a Battalion Officer Commanding and during the War of Independence he took part in attacks on Maynooth RIC Barracks and Courthouse in 1919 as well as arms raids and an ambush of British forces at Kill, County Kildare in July 1920. Arrested by British forces in December 1920 he was interned until January 1922, he served as Officer Commanding IRA prisoners at Ballykinlar Internment Camp while held there. He took the Pro-Treaty side and joined the National Army and served throughout the Civil War. He retired from the Defence Forces on the 1st of April 1946 at the rank of Major.

 

Colley Henry Edward.  AKA Harry and Harold. “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 18th of January 1972, aged about 25 during the Rising. Fought in the Summerhill Bridge, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Edge's Corner, Fairview, Gilbey's, Fairview Strand, and Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street areas. Henry Colley was wounded and captured by British forces on the night of Wednesday 27 April 1916. Between 1917 and November 1920 he served as a Company Quartermaster and Battalion Adjutant with the Irish Volunteers. He was also involved in the planning and organisation of a number of IRA operations, most notably the killing of suspected British intelligence agents on 21 November 1920 (Bloody Sunday) and the attack on the Custom House in 1921. From November 1920 to about March 1921 Colley served as Brigade Adjutant, Dublin Brigade IRA and assisted Oscar Traynor in the reorganisation of the Dublin Brigade and the setting up of that brigade’s Active Service Unit and other Dublin Brigade special services. Following the insistence of IRA General Headquarters that his position be held by a full time operative, Henry Colley became Assistant Brigade Adjutant Dublin Brigade IRA having trained his replacement Christopher O' Malley – Colley and Oscar Traynor both claim that Colley continued to carry out duties of a Brigade Adjutant following Christopher O’ Malley’s appointment. Ill health prevented Henry Colley from participating in the fighting at the outbreak of the Civil War in Dublin in June 1922. However he was involved in the planning and organisation of the IRA operation to attack bridges in the greater Dublin area (August 1922) and was arrested and interned from 9 August 1922 to 31 March 1923. According to Henry Colley and references he was released following pressure exerted on the Government by Dublin Corporation with which he was employed as a rate collector.


Collins Michael

 

Connaughton Patrick. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 2nd of April 1946, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Interned after the Rising until November 1916. He joined the Volunteers about eight weeks before the Rising, He came over from Glasgow about this time, he was a native of Longford Town, he was at home in Longford Town from Holy Thursday to Easter Monday when he arrived back in Dublin he reported to the G.P.O. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released about the end of November 1916. After release he joined up with C Company and served up to about 1918. He had no further service after 1918 and did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Connolly Brigid (Brid) Ard Craobh branch (Central Branch), Cumann na mBan, Dublin. Served in the General Post Office. Born in 1890 died on the 15 of November 1981, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. She was sent to Edward Daly on Monday 24 April 1916 along with Mrs Rogers and Leslie Price. She carried despatches between James Connolly (GPO) and Edward Daly (Church St). Following the Rising she collected arms and equipment and was involved in anti-conscription work. She had held guns from before Easter Week (from the Howth gun running) and stored arms again in 1919 and secured safe houses for men on the run. She organised a branch of Cumann na mBan in Portrane, reorganised another one in Skerries and inspected other branches in Leix (Laois), Offaly as a member of the Executive. During the Civil War, she was deputised by Austin Stack to go to England and send cables to different people in America and to wait in England for their replies. She purchased arms in the Curragh, County Kildare once or twice a week from October 1922 up to March 1923, when she was arrested. She was released at the end of November 1923. During the attack on the Four Courts, she was attached to the garrison in Barry's Hotel. She followed the instructions from Oscar Traynor to mobilise men and move arms.

 

Connolly James


Connolly Roderick James (Roddy). Fianna Éireann, Dublin Brigade. Born in1901 died on the 16th of December 1980, aged about 15 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. Joined Fianna Eireann in Belfast in 1912. He was the son of the executed leader James Connolly and as Aide-de-camp for his father and Padraig Pearse. Sometime late on Wednesday or early Thursday he was sent to Belvedere Place with a message for William O’Brien, he was unable to get back to the G.P.O. and was arrested with O’Brien in Beresford Place at 11am on the Sunday. He was held in Richmond Barracks and released about the eight or nine days later because he was under 16 years old. He was in Berlin Germany helping to negotiate the purchase of Arms when the Truce was declared, he returned to Dublin and took the Anti-Treaty side.

 

Conroy Andrew. Irish Citizen Army. Part of a small garrison of five men who occupied the premises of Hopkins and Hopkins a silversmith on the corner of O’Connell Street and the Quays makers of the Sam Maguire Cup. He was order to evacuate on the Wednesday and then ordered to re-occupy the building and to take command of a small group of men, on the Friday they were forced to retreat to the G.P.O. and while doing so he was injured. He was taken to the G.P.O where he remained until the Saturday morning when the building was evacuated, he was taken to the Coliseum Theatre with the rest of the wounded but this building had to be evacuated on the Saturday evening. The wounded were surrendered to the British in Abbey Street Saturday evening and he was taken to Jervis Street Hospital. He remained in hospital the 3rd of June 1916.  During the War of Independence he served as a Lieutenant with the ICA and was engaged in intelligence work for Joseph McGrath. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Conroy Herbert. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 3rd of March 1926, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street. He was deported after the surrender, released in June 1916. Served throughout the War of Independence during which he took part in a number of IRA operations including the burning of Raheny RIC Barracks, the attack on British Intelligence agents at Mount Street on the 21st of November 1920, known as Bloody Sunday, and the attack on Crown Forces at the London and North Western Railway Hotel in Dublin in 1921. He served as an I.R.A. Battalion Police Officer. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War serving in Dublin and Kerry. Following his demobilisation in March 1924 he joined An Gárda Síochána serving up to his death in 1926. He died from tuberculosis which was attributed to his service with the National Army.


Conway Sean Joseph. “F” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 19th of April 1897 died on the 6th of November 1959, aged 19 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Church Street, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Henry Street, O'Neill's Public House, Liffey Street and Moore Street areas. He was a member of Fianna Éireann from 1908 prior to joining the Irish Volunteers and took part in the Howth Gun-Running on 26 July 1914. He emigrated to Scotland in September 1919.

 

Conway Winifred


Cooper John Dutton. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1870 died on the 1st of July 1943, aged about 46 at the time of the Rising. He was not mobilised on Easter Monday, on the Tuesday he went to the G.P.O. where he assisted in building barricades. He also brought the stretcher to the lane off Abbey Street where James Connolly was wounded, he did not assist in carrying Connolly into the G.P.O. as he said the stretcher was too heavy. He was arrested after the surrender and deported first to Wakefield and then Frongoch, he was released in August 1916. He joined the Irish Citizen Army in 1915. He had no further service after the Rising and did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Corbally Laurence C. Irish Citizen Army. Aged 15 at the time of the Rising, he was born in Dublin. His father Richard was part of the G.P.O. Garrison. He was involved in delivering dispatches from the G.P.O. to various places around Dublin. On the Wednesday of the Rising he was ordered to deliver a dispatch to Glasnevin but was unable to get there and had to destroy the dispatch, he was unable to return to the G.P.O. He was not arrested or captured after the surrender. He served throughout the war of Independence taking part in several exchanges of fire with Crown Forces. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Corbally Richard. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1879, aged about 37 years old at the time of the Rising, he is recorded in the 1911 census as living at 7 Moore Row the same address he gave when detained by the British after the Rising, he was detained in Stafford and Frongoch after the Rising, he was released in August 1916. He is recorded on the census as a Coal Porter. His son Lawrence was also part of the G.P.O. Garrison. He remained active with the Citizen Army up to 1921, he was interned for about a month in 1921 and ceased activities after release. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Corbally Thomas. Volunteer, E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 22nd of October 1892 died on the 11th of February 1959, aged 23 years old at the time of the Rising. He was deported after the surrender and detained first at Stafford then Frongoch, he was released in December 1916. Wounded when he received a cut from broken glass when entering the G.P.O. through a window on Easter Monday, the wound was dressed by Catherine Byrne Cumann na mBan. He was born in Dublin City. He is recorded on the 1911 census living at the same address he gave when detained by the British after the Rising. He is recorded on the census as being employed as a general labourer. Due to ill health he did nottake part in the War of Independence. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.  


Molly O’Reilly Corcoran buried in Glasnevin died on the 4th of October 1950. Buried in Glasnevin Cemetery (Plot No. GK 313, South Section) Photo John O’Grady.

Corcoran Mary Teresa. (Mary O’Reilly). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1899 died on the 4th of October 1950, aged about 17 years old at the time of the Rising. Served at Liberty Hall, City Hall, Jacob’s Biscuit Factory, Reis's Building on O'Connell Street and the Bridgeman's Building on Parnell Street. She joined the Citizen Army in 1915. She was part of the party that attacked City Hall under heavy fire and also delivered dispatches between the General Post Office, City Hall, Jacob's factory and Reis's building. She was not arrested or detained after the surrender. She remained with the Citizen Army up to the end of 1918 when she joined Cumann na mBan. She worked at the United Services Club until 1920 and then at the Bonne Bouche cafe on Dawson street where she was able to get arms left by officers when they attended dances. She also collected information and addresses of officers targeted on Bloody Sunday, she was able to identify 30 or 35 men who had registered in the Club. She too the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.


Corrigan Charles

 

Corrigan James

 

Costello Edward, Killed in Action.

 

Costello Joseph Killed in Action.

 

Courtney Daniel. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Annesley Bridge, Fairview and Moore Street areas. He was deported to Knutsford Jail and then Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch in December 1916. He remained with the Citizen Army up to 1922. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Cowley Michael

 

Coyle Henry (Harry) Killed in Action

 

Craven Thomas, Kimmage Garrison. Died on the 27 of February 1955. Took part in actions in the Jobstown Quarry, Rathfarnham, Annesley Bridge Road, Fairview, O’Connell Street, Abbey Street, and Henry Street areas. He was Secretary, North of England Province, IRB and Commanding Officer Liverpool Irish Volunteers prior to April 1916. He was also in charge of despatching messengers to Tralee, Athlone and Kingstown (Dun Laoighaire) regarding mobilisation for Rising, worked as an Irish Volunteers organiser in Mayo, Derry, Down, Antrim and Armagh and, was a member of a unit working in England under Cathal Brugha's command planning to assassinate Lloyd George and other members of the British Government during the Conscription Crisis of 1918. He also worked in the USA under Harry Boland to procure money and arms for the IRA.


Cremen Michael. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1882 died on the 26th of March 1956, aged about 34 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Moore Street.  He joined the Volunteers at the inaugural meeting at the Rotunda in 1913. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Stafford Jail, he was released early in July 1916. He resumed service after his release and served throughout the War of Independence and was involved in the attack on the Customs House in May 1921. In June 1922 he went to Germany where he remained until August 1922. He served throughout the remainder of the Civil War as a full time IRA General Headquarters Officer.

 

Crimmins Thomas. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1898 died on the 13th of January 1988, aged about 18 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He joined Na Fianna in 1910 and became a member of the Volunteers in 1915. He received a bullet wound when part of a charge by the Volunteers led by The O’Rahilly in Moore Street. He was taken prisoner and held in Dublin Castle Hospital where he underwent several operations. He was transferred to King George Hospital after three months and after three weeks in that hospital he was released, a bullet was removed from his foot in 1917. He continued service with the Volunteers and was jailed in January 1920 and was released in March after a hunger strike. He went to the United States in May 1920. He did not take part in the War of Independence or Civil War.


Cripps Joseph Aloysius. Lieutenant, (attached 2nd Battalion) Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 12th of December 1975. Fought in the G.P.O., Coliseum Variety Theatre Princes Street. Was involved in taking the wounded on the Friday of the Rising from the G.P.O. to Jervis Street Hospital. He was arrested at Jervis Street Hospital. He provided first aid in the GPO and elsewhere as well as taking part in a raid for arms on the National Volunteers Headquarters in Parnell Square, Dublin. He was ordered by Patrick Pearse to obtain medical supplies for James Connolly after his wounding. From 1916 to 1918 he acted as an instructor in First Aid, Engineering and Drill as well as participating in raids for arms. From 1918 to 1919 he was appointed Company Quartermaster, participated in the raid on the offices of the Irish Independent and, due to his civilian employment, was able to gain access to British military and police magazines at Phoenix Park and Dublin Castle and supply the Irish Volunteers with information regarding same as well as data regarding various civilian and military infrastructure for possible use during the Conscription Crisis period and afterwards. During 1920 and 1921 he served as a Company Captain, participated in the destruction of Vice Regal wireless lines and attacks on British forces, assisted in developing of explosives and training of engineers nationally as well as producing articles for An t-Óglach and providing material for the IRA Engineering Handbook. He was also sent to Manchester and Liverpool in England in late 1920 by Rory O' Connor IRA Director of Engineering to assist IRA activities in those areas and the following year produced photographic miniatures of maps for IRA use on orders of Richard Mulcahy, Chief of Staff IRA. In 1922 he became IRA Dublin Brigade Quartermaster as well as assisting IRA directors of Engineering and Munitions. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and took part in fighting against National Army forces in the O'Connell Street area of Dublin and was captured and interned in Mountjoy, Gormanston and Newbridge until December 1923.



Gerald Crofts 1917

Crofts Geraald Baptist (Croft). Convicted by Court Martial and sentenced to 10 years penal servitude, five years remitted. He was released early I 1917 due to ill health. Born in Dublin he was educated by Christian Brothers and at Saint Mary’s College Rathmines. His father was a cousin of Nano Nagle foundress of the Presentation Order.

 

Croke Michael. (Mick). “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 31st of August 1967. Fought in the G.P.O. and Abbey Street areas. Interned after the Rising he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He was employed as a Carter, British Railways, North Wall, Dublin at the time of the Rising. He re-joined the Volunteers on his return from Interment but did not take an active part in the War of Independence. He was arrested in November 1920 and interned at Ballykinlar, County Down. He took no part in the Civil War. His brother Thomas Croke also served in the G.P.O. during the Rising.

 

Croke Thomas. Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1878 died on the 16th of April 1942, aged about 38 years old during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Area of General Post Office, Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street/Lower Abbey Street, Area of Lower Abbey Street, Henry Place, and Moore Street. It appears he was not a member of the Volunteers but volunteered at the G.P.O. on the Monday of the Rising, initially he was refused but returned later in the day and was admitted. He had served in the British Army, Irish Guards, discharged in January 1903. He was employed as a Porter with the Irish Insurance Commission, 45 Merrion Square, Dublin at the time of the Rising. On the 14th of November 1916 a question was asked in the House of Commons relating to the injustice of Thomas Croke losing his employment for taking part in the Rising although there was no evidence that he had, there were no further reports on the matter. He took no further part in activities after the Rising. His brother Michael Croke also served in the G.P.O. during the Rising.


Cromien John, Killed in Action.

 

Cullen May Cumann na mBan. Delivered food and dispatches to the to the Mount Street Bridge Garrison at about noon on the Wednesday.

 

Cullen William F (Liam). “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 18th of February 1942, aged about 28 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. William Cullen joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913 and from 1914 onwards was involved in the storage, distribution and transportation of munitions serving with General Headquarters and the Quartermaster Generals Department of both the Irish Volunteers and IRA as well as providing transport generally to those organisations. He served as a GHQ staff officer during the 1916 Easter Rising and was wounded on Saturday 29 April, received a bullet wound to the thigh. Cullen was imprisoned from July to September 1918 and also from November to December 1920 and took no part in the Civil War.


Cummins Mark Joseph. Volunteer, C Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 18th of September 1943. Fought at the G.P.O. On the Friday of the Rising he was involved in removing the wounded to hospital. He was deported after the surrender and detained in Stafford and Frongoch, he was released in August 1916. He was involved in Volunteers activities up to March 1920 when he emigrated to the U.S.A. for work reasons. He did not take part in the Civil War.  

 

Cummins Tom

 

Cunningham Andrew, Killed in Action.

 

Dalton Patrick. 1st battalion, Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Born in 1900 died on the 26th of December 1989, aged about 16 at the time of the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Moore Street, Williams’s Henry Street and Cole's Lane areas. Patrick Dalton was not interned following the Easter Rising having been released on account of his age. Joined the Irish Volunteers a fortnight before the 1916 Rising, he lost his employment and unable to obtain work he emigrated to England where he subsequently joined the British Army with which he served up to June 1922. He joined the National Army in July 1922 serving until discharged time expired in March 1923. He then joined the Protective Officers Corps which he left when it was disbanded in July 1923 subsequently joining the Prison Service.


Daly Denis. Volunteer, Kimmage Garrison, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 20th of March 1965, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. On the Good Friday of Easter Week he was in the second car that went to Kerry to meet the Aud, the first car drove from quay into River Laune at Ballykissane pier, he returned to Dublin on the Saturday. He served at the G.P.O. throughout Easter Week. He was deported after the Rising being released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He went to Kerry after his release and was appointed Captain of A Company (Cahirciveen). He served throughout the War of Independence. He took the Anti-Treaty sided in the Civil War and was interned from March 1923 to March 1924.

 

Daly Liam (William Daniel.)   Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 17th of June 1966, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., the Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street, Lower Abbey Street and Moore Street. He was part of the Kimmage Garrison, he was 21 years old at the time of the Rising and was born in London, his mother had left Kerry at the age of 4 and his father was born in London of Irish parents. He joined the Irish Volunteers at a meeting in Saint George’s Hall Westminster Bridge Road London on Saturday the 6th of December 1913. After the split in the Volunteers his group formed the South London Volunteers numbering about 60 men. Due to the treat of conscription a meeting of the London Volunteers was held at St. George’s Hall in the first week of January 1916 and it was decided that all single men should go to Dublin to avoid conscription, assistance would be given for travel expenses and accommodation in Dublin. On the morning of the 10th of January along with other members of his Company he left London and travelled to Dublin via Holyhead.

On Easter Monday while the G.P.O. was being occupied he assisted in erecting barricades across Lower Abbey Street using large rolls of paper from a newspaper storage depot and equipment from a bicycle shop. On several occasions the Volunteers were forced to fire over the heads of crowds that had gathered and were ordered to fix bayonets to discourage looters. Under orders from James Connolly along with Volunteer Joe Good he constructed a line of communication between the main hall and the roof of the G.P.O. He also assisted in erecting aerials for the wireless that would operate from the Wireless School to send messages to the outside world. On Wednesday morning he assisted in loading large quantities of food from the Dublin Bread Company and the wireless transmission set into a cart to be transported to the G.P.O. Later in the day he assisted in evacuating Reis’s to the Hibernia Bank. After a short time at the bank they were forced to retreat to the G.P.O. On the Friday he left the G.P.O. as part of a group of about 40 men led by The O’Rahilly with orders to establish headquarters at William and Woods factory. During the attempt to reach the factory the group came under heavy fire and he was hit in the arm the wound caused considerable bleeding. Due to his wound he was forced to take refuge in a stable where he remained until the Saturday morning. After the surrender he was taken first to Parnell Street with the rest of the wounded, their names were taken and then they were taken to Dublin Castle where their wounds were dressed by a Military Doctor. On the Sunday morning he was transferred to Kilmainham Jail where he was kept for four days. On Friday the 5th of May, along with about 300 other prisoners he was taken to the North Wall and put aboard a cattle boat and transported to Holyhead. From Holyhead he was transported by train to Wakefield prison in Yorkshire and later to Frongoch where he was prisoners number 135, he was released from Frongoch in September 1916. He returned to Dublin with Citizen Army Captain Robert de Coeur who was released from Frongoch on the same day.


Daly Seamus. 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. After the countermanding order he, along with several hundred other Volunteers, assembled at Father Matthew Park on Easter Monday, they were ordered to return home by Frank Henderson but refused. After acquiring several horse drawn wagons to transport their arms the group set off for the G.P.O., Seamus Daly was part of a group which was split from the main body and ordered to intercept a party of British infantry coming from the School of Musketry in Dollymount. The group were then ordered to take up positions at Ballybrough Bridge, they took possession of Lamb’s Public House and another shop and remained there through Monday night.

On Tuesday morning, about 11am, the group were ordered to report to the G.P.O., using the back-roads to reach the G.P.O. they received a very hostile reception from the residence of the tenements. On entering the G.P.O. Seamus Daly was put in charge of a group of men and ordered to the Imperial Hotel. That evening he had to make four trips under heavy fire to deliver bedding to the G.P.O., it was after this that Pearse promoted him to Lieutenant. On Wednesday afternoon the tank holding their water supply was hit and all their water was lost. At about 5pm British troops were seen erecting sand-bag barricades in Clery’s and soon after this the big-guns opened up and sometime during the night the Imperial Hotel was hit, a large shell exploding in the basement. The Hotel filled with flame and smoke, they sent a message to the G.P.O. but the reply was that they could do nothing for them as they were in a similar position.

At about 7pm on Thursday the Dublin Bread Company building collapsed affording the Volunteers an ideal barricade. About midnight on Thursday the order was received to evacuate the Hotel, no attempt was to be made to reach the G.P.O. as this was about to be evacuated.

Part of a group of Volunteers attempting to break out of the British cordon around O’Connell Street. These men had been in various positions including The Imperial Hotel and surrounding buildings. Frank Thornton had taken the first group but and Seamus Daly was to lead the second group 10 minutes later. Some of the first group did not make it through the cordon and were forces to retreat into the Pro-Cathedral. When they reached the intersection between Railway Street and Gardiner Street they came under heavy fire. The group ended up in a house in Gloucester Street and while discussing the best option for surrender the house was raided by British troops and they were captured. After capture he was taken to Richmond Barracks and then to Wakefield and then to Frongoch. He was released from Frongoch late in August.

 

Darcy Charles (Recorded on some Sinn Fein records as Peter D’Arcy), Killed in Action.

 

Darcy William. Volunteer, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1874 died on the 24th of December 1918, aged about 42 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. Before the Rising he worked for the Great Northern Railway (Ireland) at Dundalk, County Louth. He was Centre for the Count Louth I.R.B. He was deported after the surrender and while detained in Stafford became seriously ill with Double Pneumonia and Rheumatics as a result of exposure suffered while awaiting transfer to detention after the surrender in Dublin, he was treated in Frongoch by medical staff. He died in December 1918 the cause of his death be attributed to the treatment while in custody after the Rising.  


Davitt Daniel. Volunteer, B Company, 1st battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 18th of October 1886 died on the 18th of August 1962, aged 29 years old during the Rising. Fought at the North Circular Road Railway Bridge, Pillar House on Henry Street, the G.P.O. Cole’s Lane and Moore Street. He joined the Volunteers late 1915 or early 1916. On the Monday he was part of a party that attempted to blow up the North Circular Road Railway Bridge, the party spent the night in Glasnevin Cemetery and went to the G.P.O. on the Tuesday evening. On the Wednesday he was posted to the Pillar House where he remained until the Friday. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He had no further service after Easter Week, he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


de Burca Aoife (Eva Burke). Nurse with Cumann na mBan. Served in the G.P.O. and was sent to Reis’ Shop to attend to some wounded there. She was with Captain Tom Weafer when he was killed. She was the sister of Frank Burke who also fought in the G.P.O. for the week. Owing to the seriousness of the position in the G.P.O. on the Friday she was sent with the wounded and the Red Cross section to Jervis Street Hospital.

 

Deegan Máire. Cumann na mBan. Born in 1891 died on the 3rd of May 1939, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Served at the G.P.O. On the morning of the Rising she cycled from Gorey County Wexford with dispatches for the 1916 Leaders, the dispatches were concealed by braiding them into her long hair. She remained at the G.P.O. for five days assisting in helping the wounded. During the War of Independence she and Máire O’Neill, another Cumann na mBan member, went into business together and opened a grocery shop in 95 Upper Dorset Street Dublin.  It was called Deegan and O’Neill and was also used as a message and dispatch centre. In October 1920 she was elected onto the executive of Cumann na mBan. She took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was imprisoned in Mountjoy and Kilmainham and was also interned in in the North Dublin Union where, along with Máire Comerford and Aoife Taaffe, they scaled a high wall topped with barbed wire to make their escape.


de Paor Nancy Doctor. (Neans de Paor, Nancy Power, Wyse Power).  Ard Craobh, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1889 died on the 27th of December 1963, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Served at Borris County Carlow, County Kilkenny and at the G.P.O. on Easter Monday she carried a dispatch from PH Pearse to Dr Dundon, Borris, County Carlow and on Tuesday delivered dispatches to Kilkenny before returning to the G.P.O. She was not arrested or detained after the Rising. Following the Easter Rising she was involved in National Aid and the Volunteer Dependents' Association. In October 1916 she moved to Belfast to assist in reorganising Cumann na mBan. In November 1917 she was elected to the Executive of Cumann na mBan. In 1918 she organised a no conscription flag day and that she was also member of Dublin District Council. In November 1920 she went to Germany to complete an examination at Bonn University with the approval of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She carried dispatches from the cabinet to George Gavan Duffy in Brussels. Also states that she was arrested by British authorities upon arrival in Cologne. On her return journey to Dublin she carried dispatches from Seán T O'Ceallaigh whom she met in Paris. She returned to Dublin in February 1921 and resumed her position on the Cumann na mBan Executive. In April 1921 she was instructed by Robert Brennan, Secretary of the Department of External Affairs to return to Germany and establish a propaganda bureau for Dáil Éireann in Berlin where she remained there until August 1922. She did not take part in the Civil War.


de Stainera Michael

 

Dennany Patrick. Volunteer, C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 24th of May 1877 died on the 13th of March 1952, aged 38 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers about the end of 1913 beginning of 1914. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of September 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence, he did not take part in the Civil War.


Derham Joseph. Volunteer, F Company 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 12th of August 1966. Worked as a Civil Servant in the Office of Public Works before the Rising. He fought in the Area of Ballybough, Summerhill, and the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Dublin. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was deported after the surrender, he was released in December 1916. He appears to have had no further service and did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Devereux Patrick. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1895 died on the 4th of November 1955, aged about 21 during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, Delahunt's Public House, Fleet Street, Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street, Dublin Pro-Cathedral and Marlborough Street areas. Employed in Ross & Walpole Engineers, North Wall, Dublin. He was awarded a pension by the Irish Government for Traumatic Neurasthenia which he suffered as a result of his participation in the Rising and detention after.

 

Devine Francis. Hibernian Rifles. Born in 1881 died on the 2nd of April 1939, aged about 35 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Parliament Street areas. He was not arrested following the Easter Rising. During the War of Independence he was appointed Company Quarter-master and was involved in raids for arms and ammunition. He was involved in an armed ambush of a police car at Parnell Street. During the Truce Period he was involved with tobacco raids during the Belfast boycott and he occupied Fowler Hall for 6 to 8 weeks. He assisted in training at Mulhuddart. During the Civil War he was involved in exchanges with National Army forces at the Sackville Club, ordered to evacuate on 4 July 1922. He is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery

 

Devine Thomas William. (Tommy) “E” Company, 3rd battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1898 died on the 16th March 1969, aged about 16 during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and the areas of Fairview, Henry Street, Liffey Street and Moore Street. On the Monday of the Rising he was sent along with seven or eight other men under the command of Harry Boland to occupy Gilbeys in Fairview. They returned to the G.P.O. on Tuesday afternoon. After the Rising he was detained at Richmond Barracks for eight days, he was released due to his age. He resigned from the Irish Volunteers in 1917.

 

Devoy James Joseph. (Seamus). Volunteer, B Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 31st of January 1982. He joined the Volunteers in 1913 and took part in the Howth Gun-Running. Interned after the Rising in Frongoch until December 1916. He was one of the stretcher party for James Connolly. He re-joined the Company after release and served during the War of Independence. He did not take part in the Civil War.




He is buried in Deansgrange

Donnelly Charles. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 29th of June 1964, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Lane areas. On Easter Monday he attended a wedding, he left the wedding breakfast to go to the G.P.O. After the Rising he was interned until December 1916 arriving back in Dublin on Christmas Eve. He re-joined his company after release and took part in various activities during the War of Independence. He was imprisoned in Mount Joy from July to October 1919, he was arrested and imprisoned for distributing political leaflets outside Rathfarnham Church, while in prison he served as Officer Commanding political prisoners and took part in a hunger strike. He served as 2nd Lieutenant with E Company from 1918 until the Truce. He acted as a rate collector in County Dublin providing funds for Dáil Éireann and provided information regarding a British intelligence. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Donnelly Patrick. Volunteer, E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 3rd of November 1873 died on the 8th of January 1958, aged 42 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers in February 1914 and was employed by P.H. Pearse at Saint Enda’s College and lived at the Hermitage. He was deported after the surrender and was imprisoned in Stafford Jail and Frongoch, he was released about the 24th of December 1916. He was involved in the Kilcool gun-running in 1914 and before Easter Week was involved in making munitions and transporting bombs to various parts of Dublin. He re-joined the Company on reorganisation about February or March 1917. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti=Treaty side in the Civil War.

 

Dore Eamon T

 

Dore Mrs. Nora Daly

 

Dowling Michael. Volunteer, F Company, 4th battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1898 died on the 16th of April 1948, aged about 18 years old at the time of the Rising.  Fought at the G.P.O. He was captured after the surrender and spent ten weeks in Dublin Castle Hospital after receiving a wound to his left foot during the fighting, he lost the big toe on his left foot as a result of the wound. He was deported after the wound has healed and served time in Wormwood Scrubs and Frongoch, he was released about September 1916. He re-joined the Company on release from Frongoch and served throughout the War of Independence being involved in purchasing arms, the Republican Courts and was interned from May 1921 to July 1921. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War, he was interned on the 3rd of October 1922 and released about February 1923. His two brothers Andrew and John also fought in the Rising.

 

Downie Margaret (Margaret Viant, Peggy). Liverpool Branch. Cumann na mBan. Served in the G.P.O. Jervis Street Hospital and Jacob's Biscuit Factory, Bishop Street. She was not arrested or detained after the Rising and returned to Liverpool in May 1916, she had no further service.


Doyle Edward. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1888 died on the 12th of January 1948, aged about 28 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., the Dublin Bread Company, Hopkins and Hopkins and Moore Street.  He was deported after the surrender and released from Frongoch in July 1916. He re-joined the Irish Citizen Army early in 1917 and served up to the Truce, he was not involved in any activities during the War of Independence and was not involved in the Civil War.

 

Doyle John Joseph. “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 26th of November 1961, aged about 27 years old during the Rising.  Fought in the G.P.O., Moore Street and Moore Lane areas. After the Rising he was captured and interned until December of 1916. After release he was again arrested and imprisoned between January and October 1919 undergoing hunger strike during this time. On his release he travelled to Liverpool and then to the U.S.A.  Working for the Irish Republican Mission there and returned to Ireland in September 1920. Following his return he became IRA Company Lieutenant and from then until his arrest in April 1921 he was involved in a large number of IRA attacks and operations against British forces and military targets especially in the area of Dublin popularly known at the time as the "Dardanelles" (the area of Camden Street, Aungier Street, and George’s Street). John Doyle was also involved in the IRA operations against suspected British Intelligence agents in Dublin on 21 November 1920, Bloody Sunday, in particular the killing of a Captain Fitzgerald in Earlsfort Terrace. Rearrested in April 1921 Doyle was imprisoned until released from Dartmoor Prison, England in January 1922.

 

Doyle John. Medical Services, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 19th of December 1972 age at the time of the Rising unknown.  Served in the G.P.O. and Coliseum Variety Theatre, O'Connell Street. John Doyle served as Medical Officer for Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers and IRA from prior to the Easter Rising in 1916 through the War of Independence up to the end of the Civil War in 1923. During Easter Week while in the General Post Office he was attached to Irish Volunteers General Headquarters. John Doyle was held prisoner for 2 days by British forces following the surrender at the end of the Easter Rising and was not subsequently interned. At the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 John Doyle served with the IRA in the fighting against National Army forces in Dublin and was captured and imprisoned for approximately 6 weeks from October 1922.


Doyle John. Volunteer, C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 26th of April 1894 died on the 14th of January 1952, aged 22 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was deported after the surrender and detained in Knutsford and Frongoch, he was released about August 1916.  He re-joined the Volunteers after release and served throughout the War of Independence. He was arrested in April 1918 following a raid for arms and was sentenced to five years penal service. He took part in an ambush on British forces in Marlboro' Street, Dublin in February 1921. During the War of Independence he was involved in intelligence work. He enlisted in the National Army in February 1922 at Oriel House and served in Criminal Investigation Department before it was disbanded on the 29th of October 1923. Sometime late in 1922 he was wounded at Berkley Street. He transferred to the Protective Force in which he served until the 30th November 1924. He joined the Gárda Síochána and was discharged on the 28th of December 1949.  

 

Doyle Peter. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 14th of December 1976. Fought at the G.P.O. the area of City Hall and Moore Street. He was deported after the surrender, released about the 18th of August 1916.He re-joined the Company and served throughout the War of Independence when he took part in an ambush at Rotunda Hospital, Parnell Street, Dublin, and arms raid at Findlater's Place. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was involved in the fighting at Fowler Hall, Barry’s and the Hammam Hotel, he was not interned and remained with the Company until the end of the Civil War but took no active part as there were very few men left in the Company.


Drury Patrick Joseph. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1892 died on the 21st of May 1977, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Fought at Fleet Street, Westmoreland Street and the Imperial Hotel on O'Connell Street. He was not arrested or captured after the surrender. On reorganisation of the Volunteers he joined F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade and served throughout the War of Independence. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army in October 1922 he was demobilised on the 7th of March 1924.

 

Duffy Edward. Volunteer, F Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 12th of October 1898 died on the 17th of August 1951, aged 17 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O.  He was deported after the Rising first to Stafford and then Frongoch and released in August 1916. He took part in the War of Independence taking part in raids for arms and during the Truce acted as a Republican Policeman and attended Mulhuddard Camp. At the outbreak of the Civil War his gun was taken from him in Blackhall Street and he took no further part in the Civil War.

 

Duffy Joseph. Volunteer, Kimmage (Larkfield) Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 13th of May 1972, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Fairview, Abbey Street, the G.P.O. and surrounding areas. He joined Irish Volunteers in Liverpool in 1913 arriving in Dublin in February 1916, he had been a member of the I.R.B. since 1910. He was interned after the Rising being detained in Stafford and Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on released and served up to the 31st of March 1917 when he returned to England to be with his wife and child. He took no part in the War of Independence or Civil War.

 

Dunne Francis. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 12th of October 1965, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought at Father Matthew Park and Annesley Bridge in Fairview and the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was deported after the surrender and released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on reorganisation and served up to about 1919. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.

 

Dunne John Joseph. Born in Dublin, he was 19 years old at the time of the Rising. He was employed as a Clerk. He is recorded in the 1911 census at the same address given when he was detained by the British after the Rising. He is recorded on the census as speaking English and Irish. He was detained in Knutsford. He died on the 10th of October 1978 at his son’s residence in Connecticut U.S.A.

 

Dunne Joseph. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 20th of June 1967, aged about 25 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was employed as a taxi driver with Thompsons Motor Company and had access to a car. On the Sunday morning before the Rising he carried dispatches from Pears to James Rafter in Enniscorthy. He arrived back on the Monday morning and took a passenger to Fairy House races where he remained for the day. On returning to Dublin he learned of the Rising, went home and got his rifle and uniform and reported to the G.P.O. He remained at the G.P.O.  throughout the week. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford and then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He remained with the Volunteers until late 1918 when due to work commitments he was unable to carry on although he did try to support the Volunteers in whatever way he could during the War of Independence. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Dunne Thomas. Volunteer, B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 15th of August 1961. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford then Frongoch, he was released on the 23rd of December 1916. He was involved in the anti-conscription and dropped out soon after. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.  

 

Dwyer Michael. Died in 1943 aged 41, he fought in St Stephen’s Green and the G.P.O., he was a prominent member of the 1916 Veterans Association.

 

Dyas Albert. Dublin Brigade, Fianna Eireann. Born in 1899 died on the 11th of July 1960, aged about 17 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. Moore Street and William’s on Henry Street. He joined An Cead Slugh Camden Street in December 1912 and previous to Easter Week was a section leader. On Easter Monday, about 12.30pm he was on his way to Camden Street when he saw the G.P.O. was occupied so he reported for duty there. He remained at the G.P.O. where he spent most of the week manning the windows in the instrument room, he was armed with a shotgun. He was part of the evacuation from the G.P.O. on Easter Friday and came under heavy fire in the area of Samson’s Lane and Henry Street. He helped drag the injured Jack Kenny into William’s on Henry Street where they remained for the night. There were around 20 men in the building and they surrendered on the Saturday afternoon. After the surrender he was taken to Richmond Barracks where he was held until the 24th of May, he was released due to his young age. Late in 1916 he helped reorganise A Company Fianna Eireann at 6 Harcourt Street. He transferred to the Volunteers in 1917 and had no further service after 1917. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.  


 

Early John

 

English Maire. Ard Craogh Branch, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1887 died on the 2nd of January 1968, aged about 29 years old during the Rising. Served in the Hibernian Bank, Reis's Building, Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street/Lower Abbey Street and General Post Office areas. She joined Cumann na mBan Central Branch before Easter Sunday and remained a member until 1923. She helped mobilising others on Sunday 23rd and Monday 24th of April. She and others first went to the Hibernian Bank to set up a base hospital and she was sent home on Wednesday 26th. Later in the week she carried ammunition and messages to Paddy Belton for the Volunteers in Ashbourne. Following the Rising she visited people amongst others, Captain Weafer's wife to whom she did not reveal that her husband had died and general was involved with the Dependants' Fund, as well as doing anti-conscription work and more routine work up to the Truce. She also took care of a man called Peter Fleming, on the run at that time. During the Civil War she helped in a general manner getting bandages to Lily Brennan in the Four Courts, courier, helped with food in Hickey's following this, she worked mostly as a dispatch carrier for Maria Gleeson. She helped other men on the run among them Bartle Flynn, Charlie Price.


English Patrick F Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born March 1894 died on the 27th of January 1970, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. Detained in Stafford Jail and then Frongoch after the Rising, released in December 1916. He was a member of Fianna Eireann before joining the Volunteers.


English Patrick Francis F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1879 died on the 24th of March 1949, aged about 33 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street, and Pro-Cathedral, Marlborough Street areas. He was not arrested after the Rising. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was at his home in Howth on Easter Monday when he heard of the Rising, he walked into the city arriving about 10pm, and he spent Tuesday at a friend’s house and reported for duty at the Imperial Hotel on the Wednesday morning about 10am. He re-joined his Company when it reformed after the Rising but had to resign due to ill health in October 1918, he did not take part in the War of Independence or Civil War.


Ennis Thomas. Part of the Company that went with Captain Weafer to occupy the Hibernian Bank block to provide cover for the Radio at the Wireless School. Achieved the rank of Major General in the Free State Army.

 

Finegan Michael

 

Desmond Fitzgerald in 1917

Fitzgerald Desmond. Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 9th of May 1947, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. He was deported from Kerry in 1915 because of his activities in forming the Volunteers there. In October 1915 he was sentenced to six months in Mountjoy for a speech he made at Bray County Wicklow, he was only released three weeks before the Rising. He was sentenced to 20 years penal Servitude for his part in the Rising. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War. He went on to serve as a Minister in Saorstát Éireann and was also a member of Seanad Éireann.

 

Fitzharris John J. Born in Dublin. He was 22 years old at the time of the Rising. He was released from Military custody between the 4th and 7 of June 1916.

 

Fitzpatrick Andrew J. Citzen Army. Part of a small garrison of 5 men who occupied the premises of Hopkins and Hopkins a silversmith on the corner of O’Connell Street and the Quays makers of the Sam Maguire Cup.

 

Flanagan Matthew. Severely injured while attempting to retreat from O’Connell Street in the early hours of Friday morning. Part of a group of Volunteers attempting to break out of the British cordon around O’Connell Street. These men had been in various positions including The Imperial Hotel and surrounding buildings. Frank Thornton had taken the first group but and Seamus Daly was to lead the second group 10 minutes later. Some of the first group did not make it through the cordon and were forces to retreat into the Pro-Cathedral. When they reached the intersection between Railway Street and Gardiner Street they came under heavy fire.

 

Flanagan Reverend John CC

 

Flynn Ignatius George. E Company. Wounded during the fighting. 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 14th of March 1922, aged about 21 during the Rising. Fought in the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street. He was captured by British forces and hospitalised at Dublin Castle Hospital, the Mater Hospital, Dublin and Beaumont Convalescent Home. He died on the 14th of March 1922 of Meningitis and Asthenis  (Asthenias). His widow made a claim to the Army Pensions board claiming that his death was due to injuries received during the Rising but this claim was rejected. 


Flood Josephine nee Neary. Ard Craobh (central) branch, North Dublin, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1895, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Joined Cumann na mBan in 1915 and served until 1921. She mobilised for Easter Week on Tuesday 25th April. She was arrested by British military in January 1921 and detained in Mountjoy for a fortnight. Her sister, Sarah Neary (Henderson) was mobilised on Monday 24th and was in charge of Colmcille branch.


Fogarty Thomas

Foley Michael Patrick. D Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 10th of July 1893 died on the 19th of July 1960, aged 22 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O., Henry Street and Moore Street. He was interned after the Rising, released in August 1916. He served as a Company and Battalion Commanding Officer with the Irish Volunteers and IRA from 1918 to 1920. He was arrested in December 1920 and interned at Rath Camp until December 1921. Michael Foley claims to have been appointed by Michael Collins to assist reorganisation of the Irish Volunteers in County Offaly. He also claims to have provided Irish Volunteers GHQ with intelligence regarding RIC Detective Sergeant Daniel Hoey's activities in Offaly. Evidence in file from Foley and references/witnesses contain evidence of some confusion/disagreement regarding Foley's actual activities during Easter Week 1916. Similarly file contains evidence of considerable disagreement within Irish Volunteer and Sinn Fein circles within Edenderry and Offaly generally during the period from 1917 to 1920 including allegations from Foley and others of named Sinn Fein members providing information to the RIC.



Fox Michael. F Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 27 of October 1891 died on the 3rd of January 1982, aged 24 years old during the Rising. Employed as a labourer in the Great South Western Railway Company at the time of the Rising. Interned until August 1916, served with the IRA during the War of Independence and Truce Period from 1920 to 1922 and with the National Army through the Civil War from 1922 to 1923. Participated in the Red Cow ambush in 1921. Joined the National Army in February 1922 and served on the Quartermasters Staff in Beggars Bush Barracks. He continued serving, at the rank of Private, with the Defence Forces until April 1924.

 

Frick Bernard

 

Furlong Andrew, Kimmage Garrison. Wounded in the knee when all the Volunteers where gathered in the large main room of the G.P.O., Pearse was addressing the group informing them that their position had become untenable, a bullet struck Furlong in the knee. Patrick Caldwell, Bernard Carmichael and Andrew Friel, members of the Kimmage Garrison, were ordered to take Furlong to Jervis Street Hospital. Unable to reach the Hospital the group returned with the injured man to the G.P.O. which they found was evacuated when they returned, the group left the G.P.O. into Henry Street and on to a barricade in Henry Place.

 

Gahan Joseph, Kimmage Garrison. Born in 1895 died on the 30th of July 1969, aged about 21 during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Dublin Pillar House O'Connell Street,  General Post Office, Ship Inn and  Abbey Street, areas. Took part in occupying Ship Inn, Abbey Street, and Pillar House, O'Connell Street. Detained in Wandsworth and Frongoch until July 1916.

Joseph Gahan is buried in Glasnevin cemetery Dublin, he died on the 30th of July 1969.


Gallagher Patrick. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 7th of October 1893 died on the 10th of August 1964, aged 22 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. Interned until December 1916.

 

Galligan Paul

 

Gannon Henry (Harry) Born in Dublin and was a painter by trade. He was 34 years old at the time of the Rising. He was detained in Knutsford after the Rising.

 

Garland Patrick Joseph. Born in Dublin and was 19 years old at the time of the Rising.

 

Gavan John James. F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 21 of July 1945, aged about 24 years old during the Rising. He joined the Volunteers when the Volunteers occupied Lambe’s Public House where he was employed as a barman on Easter Monday. He was interned after the Rising in Stafford Jail and the North Camp Frongoch, he was released August 1916. John James Gavan received an award under the Army Pensions Acts in 1928 in respect of neurasthenia (Chronic Fatigue) which Gavan and references attributed to mistreatment which it is alleged he received from a British Army officer following the surrender of Irish Volunteer forces at the end of the Easter Rising.


 

Gethings Lucie

 

Gibson Richard. F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Date of birth unknown died on the 4th of February 1977. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. Interned until December 1916 he was taken from Kilmainham to Knutsford then Frongoch and after spending some time in Wandsworth Jail he was returned to Frongoch, he was wounded during the fighting. He was employed by the Midland Railway at the time of the Rising and did not go to the G.P.O. until the Tuesday because he was working on Easter Monday. Although he re-joined after his release he had to resign soon after due to ill health as a consequence of his injuries received during Easter Week.

 

Giffney Michael

 

Gleeson Joseph, Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 18th of December 1959 aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He was the North of England representative on the Supreme Council of the IRB from 1912 to 1917. After the Rising he served on the staff of Michael Collins before serving with the Meath Brigade during the War of Independence until his arrest and internment in December 1920. During the Civil War he served in the Printing and Stationary Department of the Quartermaster General's staff. His brother Martin (see below) also fought in the G.P.O. during the Rising.

 

Gleeson Martin, Kimmage Garrison, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1882 died on the 12th of November 1947, aged about 34 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. He was a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood before the Rising. His brother Joseph also fought in the G.P.O. He was interned until December 1916. He joined the National Army on 1 May 1922 and served throughout the subsequent Civil War in the Accounts Office of Quartermaster General's department. He was demobilised from the Defence Forces in March 1924 at the rank of Lieutenant while serving with the Kerry Command. He was the owner of the premises, 10A Aungier Street, Dublin, from which An t-Óglach was printed in 1921.


 

Gogan Richard P. B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1900 died on the 28th of May 1982, aged 16 at the time of the Rising. Spoke Irish. Assisted in carrying the injured James Connolly across Henry Street into Henry Place and on to Moore Street under heavy machine-gun fire.  Served as a mobiliser and was released after a weeks detention on account of his age following the surrender. Served with the Irish Volunteers and the IRA from 1916 through the War of Independence, Truce Period and Civil War until 1923. Richard P. Gogan served as company orderly and was responsible for care, maintenance and delivery of weapons to and from subject's father's premises at 184 Parnell Street and 371-373 North Circular Road, which were used as IRA arms dumps throughout the period and 184 Parnell Street as a munitions factory during the Civil War. He also provided first aid to wounded volunteers following ambushes on a number of occasions, carried out despatch work and took part in fighting in Dublin against National Army forces.


 

Goode Alfred Joseph, Kimmage Garrison.

 

Grenan Julia. Cumann na mBan, Nurse. Served in the G.P.O. throughout Easter Week providing first aid and meals to the Rebels during Easter Week.

 

Harris Thomas

 

Hayes James Joseph. C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 26th of April 1941, aged about 28 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Annesley Bridge Fairview, General Post Office and Imperial Hotel areas. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until August 1916. Due to ill health he had limited involvement in the War of Independence.


Healy John, Killed in Action.

 

Healy Richard

 

Heffernan Michael. Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 5th of June 1954, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. Michael Heffernan was arrested by British forces in Jervis Street Hospital at the end of the Easter Rising where he was being treated for injuries received in a fall while participating in fighting against British forces earlier in the week. He was subsequently interned until August 1916. During the War of Independence he mobilised for IRA operations surrounding the escape of Frank Teeling and other IRA prisoners from Kilmainham Jail in 1920 as well as the occupation of the Inchicore Railway Works. In April 1922 he took part in the IRA occupation of the Four Courts and following the outbreak of the Civil War in June that year and took part in the IRA defence of 44 Parnell Square against National Army forces. He had no further activities.

 
Hegarty Sean,
Kimmage Garrison.

 

Henderson Frank Captain F Company 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Joined the Irish Volunteers at the inaugural meeting at the Rotunda in October 1913. After the countermanding order was issued by McNeill on Easter Sunday Frank Henderson’s company were ordered to ‘stand to arms’ and no man was to leave the City. The Company was ordered to parade in Stephen’s Green at 10am on Easter Monday. After some confusion and disagreement among the officers and a short de-mobilisation the Company re-mobilised with a strength of between 80 and 100 Volunteers and they marched off from Father Matthew Park at about 3pm.

The first action Frank Henderson’s column saw was on the march to the G.P.O., they encountered a detachment of British troops coming from Bull Island training camp. Henderson’s column sized a house commanding the Tolka Bridge at Ballybough, part of this building was occupied by a shop wine store called Gilbeys, the house was barricade by the Volunteers but by the time they had finished the barricading the British troops had retreated. After some time the Volunteers decided to occupy Lamb’s Public House which gave them a complete view of the bridge from the city and to defend if from an approach from Drumcondra direction via Richmond Park. The group managed to secure provisions from a butcher in Fairview and to commandeer a Dublin Bread Company cart. They occupied these positions until late Tuesday when they were ordered by James Connolly to try and make it to the G.P.O., when they eventually made it to the front entrance of the G.P.O. they were fired on by Volunteers in the Imperial Hotel who thougt they were enemy forces due to the fact that they had some prisoners in British Army uniform with them.

Once inside the G.P.O. Henderson was ordered along with 21 other Volunteers to occupy buildings in Henry Street, the two building they occupied were McDowell’s Shop and Bewley’s Provisions shop. The group secured as much food as they could from the shops in Henry Street, sending a large proportion of this back to the G.P.O. As they erected barricades across Henry Street using goods from the shops a large mod removed the items from the Barricade as quickly as the Volunteers put it there, the Volunteers first fire a volley of shots over the heads of the mob but this had no effect so they were forced to fix bayonets and charge the mob, the bayonet charge had the desired affect and the mob fled. Sometime on the Thursday everyone was withdrawn to the G.P.O. as an attack was felt to be imminent, he remained in the G.P.O. until the evacuation.

He spent Saturday night on the small green outside the Rotunda before being transferred to Richmond Barracks the next day. After Richmond Barracks he was taken to Holyhead by cattle boat and then to Stafford Jail. In July he was transferred to Frongoch, he appeared before the Sankey tribunal and was released from Frongoch on Christmas Eve 1916.

 

Higgins Frederick P

 

Higgins peter

 

Hoey Patricia


Holohan Hugh Aloysius. Lieutenant, A Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 26th of March 1899, aged 27 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Phibsborough Bridge, the G.P.O. and in Moore Street. He was deported after the surrender and served time in Knutsford Jail, Wormwood Scrubs and Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch in August 1916. After release he went to the U.S.A. until the September 1917. He returned to Ireland and served during the War of Independence, he was imprisoned about April 6th 1920 and after 10 days on hunger strike was released. He returned to the U.S.A. in December 1920 where he assisted in raising funds for Volunteer dependants. He did not take part in the Civil War.


Hughes Patrick



Hughes James. Dundalk Battalion, North Louth Battalion, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 16th of June 1897 died on the 19th of October 1942, aged 18 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Ballybrrack, Lurgangreen and Castlebellingham in County Louth, Dunboyne County Meath, Tyrrellstown House County Dublin and at the G.P.O. He was interned after the Rising being released about July 1916. He returned to Dundalk where he was instructed to go to Dunboyne, County Meath regarding dumped arms. He moved to Dublin in October 1916 where he joined C Company, 2nd Battalion, Irish Volunteers. During the War of Independence he attended parades and lectures and was sent to trace underground telephone lines. Also took part in patrols in the Dorset Street area until January 1921. He carried dispatches to General Headquarters and delivered rifles to Dundalk. He was appointed Staff Captain and assigned to the South Wexford Brigade where he undertook tours and gave instruction. In 1921 he established a camp near New Ross, County Wexford for training officers. On a visit to Dublin he was commissioned by Gearoíd O'Sullivan GHQ, IRA to induct officers into the Irish Republican Brotherhood "in order to have at the head of the army, men who won't let down the Republic". During the Truce Period he was sent as an organiser to Roscommon and Galway. He returned to Galway as Liaison Officer in November 1921 before transferring to Mayo in December 1921 and resigning in January 1922. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and served with the First Southern Division at the rank of Commandant. He took over barracks in Fermoy, County Cork and Waterford and coastguard stations in Cork and Kerry and reported to the Four Courts and was appointed Adjutant, Fifth Battalion, Dublin Brigade. In July or August 1922 he was asked to assist in establishing a munitions factory. He was arrested in February 1923 and released in October 1923. He went to the US and served as an Engineer with the United States Mercantile Marine and was killed during a torpedo attack on the SS Steel Navigator in the mid-Atlantic in October 1942.

 

Hunter James. An experienced builder he was invaluable when breaking through the walls of the buildings in Henry Street linking Henry Street to the G.P.O.

 

Hutchinson Joseph. He was born in Dublin in 1882 and was aged 34 during the Rising. He served in F Coy 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade IRA from 1913 to 1921. He was a Printer by trade and lived at 12 Summerhill Parade Dublin. On 3rd May 1916 he was sent to Knutsford Jail in England along with other Political prisoners and was released in June 1917.

 

Hynes John F

 

Inglis Frainne

 

Jackson P

 

Jenkinson Margaret nee Walsh



 Jones Thomas. He was killed in action during the Civil War:

The following three soldiers of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces were abducted from McCabe’s Public House about a mile East of Palace East County Wexford on the 24th of March 1923. The bodies of the three men were later recovered from a farm in Adamstown, New Ross, the three soldiers were:
  • Lieutenant Thomas Jones a native of Dublin. He was born in 1897 and was 26 years old when he was killed. He fought in the 1916 Rising, he was part of the G.P.O. Garrison, he served with the I.R.A. throughout the War of Independence. He was employed as a labourer before joining the National Army. The image above is of his 1916 medal posthumously awarded to his family in 1941.
  • Sergeant Edward O’Gorman (Gorman), from Chapel Lane, Kilkenny.
  • Private Patrick Horan, from Callan, Co. Kilkenny.

 

Joyce Brian

 

Kavanagh Ernest, Killed in Action.

 

Kavanagh Seamus

 

Kealy John

 

Kearney Thomas. Volunteer, E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 18th of December 1969, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Annesley Bridge Road in Fairview, the G.P.O. and in the Moore Street area. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until September 1916. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers and took part in the usual activities. During the War of Independence he was involved in burning of Rockbrook Barracks and ambush of British forces at Kenilworth Road and took part in armed patrols and ambush at Templeogue. He enlisted in the Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces on the 21st of August 1922 at Portobello Barracks, transferred to the Army Corps of Engineers before been discharged from the Defence Forces on 31 March 1924, Army service number 31565.


Kearns Hubert. Born in Dublin. He was 17 years old at the time of the Rising. His brothers John, Frank, Joseph and Thomas also fought in the Rising.

 

Keating Con

 

Keeling Christopher

 

Keely John (Sean) Killed in Action.

 

Kelly Barber, Kathleen J

 

Kelly Edward

 

Kelly Francis Matthew. Volunteer, Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 3rd f January 1977, aged about 28 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers in London late in 1913 or early 1914. He was deported after the surrender being released from Frongoch at Christmas 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on release and spent five weeks in Lincoln England in connection with the escape of de Valera from Lincoln Jail. He was also active in assisting Michael Collins with munitions work he also did clerical work in Sinn Fein H.Q.  He was also involved in special services in Local Government and Foreign Affairs on behalf of political leaders such as Arthur Griffith and Eamon de Valera as a Dáil employee during the 1919-1922 periods. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War taking part in the printing of anti-Treaty news bulletins, War News. He was interned in Hare Park, County Kildare early in October 1922 and released late in 1924.

 

Kelly John. Volunteer, 5th Battalion (Fingal Battalion), Swords Company, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1878 died on the 7th of August 1939, aged about 38 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and at Kelly's Gun & Ammunition Shop, O'Connell Street Bachelor's Walk and the Metropole Hotel O'Connell Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was one of twelve Volunteers that covered the retreat from the G.P.O. to Moore Lane. He was detained at the surrender and deported being released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers after release and took part in the War of Independence taking part in an attack on Rush Barracks and an attempted ambush of the Military at Lissenhall. He was arrested in Swords Village on the 6th of December 1920 and held until February 1921. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

Kelly Joseph. Volunteer, B Company, 3rd battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1900 died in the 4th of February 1969, aged 15 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Moore Street.  He was not a member of the Volunteers but joined at the G.P.O. on Easter Monday. He was detained after the surrender and held for about a week at Richmond Barracks then released due to his age. He re-joined the Volunteers when they reorganised in 1917 and served throughout the War of Independence and Civil War. He was arrested in March 1921 and sentenced to five years in prison for having an Arsenal, he was deported to Dartmoor being released in February 1922. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and remained on the run until 1925.

 

Kennan Austin

 

Luke Kennedy is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery Dublin (Photo John O’Grady)

Kennedy Luke. General Headquarters, Member of the Executive, Irish Volunteers, he was also a member of the I.R.B. Born in 1867 died in 1954, aged about 49 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Reis's Jewellers on Abbey Street, Saint Stephen’s Green and Moore Street. Before the Rising he with another Volunteer he left Phibsboro Dublin at midnight on the Saturday to meet the Aud at Fenit, when the learned of the Aud they diverted to Clare in an attempt to learn of preparations for the Rising.  They then returned to Dublin and reported to the G.P.O. As an electrician he was involved with the wireless plant in Reis’s. He was part of the surrender in Moore Street and was first taken to Richmond Barracks then deported first to Wormwood Scrubs, Wandsworth, Knutsford and then Frongoch, he was released sometime in August 1916.  After release he was involved in reorganisation the Volunteers mainly in the West of Ireland and was also heavily involved in repairing arms. From 1919 up to the Truce he was mainly involved with the Labour Board and used his Trade Union influences to recruit men for the Volunteers.  He claims that as a member of the Executive had he been present when the names were being added to the Proclamation his name would have been added and if you read his statement for his pension application and details of his involvement before the Rising it does look like he would have been entitled to have his name added.


Kenny Henry Vincent. A Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 2nd of August 1968, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Served in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Henry Street, Abbey Street and Moore Street areas. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Henry Kenny was interned until December of 1916. During the War of Independence he took part in Irish Volunteers and IRA arms raids and IRA armed street patrols, the burning of Stepaside RIC Barracks, mobilised for an attempted attack on General Tudor, served in the Belfast Boycott unit and served on the staff of Rory O'Connor. He joined the National Army in February 1922 leaving the following March at the time of the 'Army Split' but returned to service again in April. He served throughout the subsequent Civil War and resigned from the Defence Forces on 2 April 1927.


 

Kenny James

 

Kenny John. Volunteer, F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 2th of May 1978, aged about 19 at the time of the Rising. Fought at Annesley Bridge in Fairview, the G.P.O., Henry Street and Moore Street. He was wounded in the left lung on Friday the 28th of April while attempting to make barricades on Moore Street. He received treatment for two month in Jervis Street hospital and on discharge from hospital was arrested and taken to Kilmainham Jail, he was then deported first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released at the end of December 1916. He re-joined the Company on release and served throughout the War of Independence. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army on the 27th of April 1922 and was discharged on the 30th of August 1922 at the rank of Sergeant serving with the 2nd Eastern Division, service number 5120.

 

Kenny Michael

 

Keogh Bernard

 

Keogh Gerald, Killed in Action.

 

Keogh Michael

 

Kerr Sean (John) Patrick. Volunteer, F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 12th of April 1979, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. He fought at Gilbey’s and Annesley Bridge in Fairview, Wharf Road, the G.P.O. O'Neill's Public House on Liffey Street and Moore Street.  He was deported after the Rising and detained in Stafford and Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He joined the Volunteers at Fairview Park when the Company started in 1914. He had been living in Liverpool and came to Dublin in 1913.  In 1920 and 1921 during the War of Independence he served with the Liverpool Company of the I.R.A. and took part in I.R.A. arson attacks in that city in November 1920. He also assisted in the collection and importation of arms to Ireland from England and Scotland for the IRA and also worked on ships travelling between England, the USA, Canada, Belgium and Ireland. This work continued up to and including April or May 1922 when his service ceased and by which time he had moved to the USA. John Patrick Kerr was the son of Neill Kerr also heavily involved with the Irish Volunteers and IRA in Liverpool and active in the importation of material to Ireland for those organisations.

 

Kerwan P

 

Killeen Robert

 

Kilmartin Patrick. B Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 18th of November 1976, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Railway Bridge, North Circular Road, Dublin and G.P.O. areas. He collected explosives from Michael Staines in the G.P.O in the early hours of Tuesday the 25th of April and was arrested later that day. He was interned in Arbour Hill Prison, Dublin and later Wakefield Prison, England before being released on 2nd June 1916. During the War of Independence he engaged in buying arms from British Military during the period 1918-1920. He was excused from attending parades due to having business dealings with the British Military.


King Daniel. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1891 died on the 1st of December 1941, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. He joined the Citizen Army in 1913. On Easter Monday he was part of a group ordered to Dublin Castle where he was wounded when hit by a bullet when attacking the Castle gates. His wounds were dressed by Molly Reilly and he was taken to Vincent’s Hospital being discharged after one hour. After leaving hospital he reported to the G.P.O. where, in view of his injuries, he was ordered to go home by James Connolly. He returned to the G.P.O. on the Tuesday where he acted as messenger delivering cigarettes to the garrison and delivering a message to Stephen’s Green. He reported to the G.P.O. on Wednesday but getting nothing to do he went home, he attempted to report to the G.P.O. again on Thursday was unable to get there do to the British Army cordon. He was not arrested after the Rising, he remained with the Citizen Army until 1917, and he took no part in the War of Independence or Civil War.


King George, Kimmage Garrison.

 

King John. Volunteer  (Quartermaster), Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers.  Born in 1890 died on the 12th of August 1969, aged about 26 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought as Liberty Hall, the G.P.O. and Moore Lane. He joined the Irish Volunteers in Liverpool about February or March 1914. He came to Dublin on the 31st of January 1916. He was wounded on the Friday (28th of April) of the Rising, wounded on both legs, and after receiving First Aid he was brought to Dublin Castle Hospital on the Saturday after the surrender. He was in the Hospital until about the end of June 1916. After being discharged from the Hospital he was detained in Kilmainham for about a week then deported first to Knutsford for about two weeks then Frongoch, he was released on the 23rd of December 1916. During his time in Frongoch he was taken to Liverpool and charged with deserting the British Army, he was deemed not fit for service and returned to Frongoch. He took no further part in Volunteer or I.R.A> activities after his release. He did not take part in the Civil War.


 

King Patrick. Quartermaster, Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 19th of November 1979, aged about 30 years old during the Rising. Fought at Fairview, Abbey Street and the G.P.O. He was deported after the surrender serving time in Stafford and then Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence at various ranks including Company Officer Commanding with 4th Company, 5th Battalion (Engineers Battalion) and Quartermaster General's Department with General Headquarters. He was interned from December 1920 to December 1921. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War joining the National Army in February 1922 and serving up to March 1929,  he re-joined during the Emergency (Second World War) serving until the 1st of April 1946 at the rank of Commandant.

 

King Samuel. Private Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 18 of December 1945. Served in Henry & James, Parliament Street, Imperial Hotel, Gardiner Street, Waterford Street and the G.P.O. He was captured by the British Army on the Saturday in Waterford Street along with five other Volunteers, he was detained in the Customs House escaping after ten days. During the War of Independence he took part in raids for arms and destroying good from Belfast during the boycott.


 Knightly Michael

 

Lambert Bridget (Bridget Doran) Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1897, aged about 19 years old during the Rising. Irish Speaker. She was attached to the Irish Citizen Army from 1913 up 1916 or 1917 when she joined Cumann na mBan. She was mainly engaged in helping with cooking along with her sister (Ellen Stynes) in the GPO. Both of them were arrested on the Friday and taken to the Broadstone station from where they were released after a few hours. Being unable to go home, they went to the night refuge on Henrietta Street. After the Rising, Bridget Doran assisted in the sending parcels to prisoners and helped to collect funds. She was mostly active in the Dundrum, Millotwn, Sandyford, Rathfarnham area. She attended the usual meetings and lectures. She also carried dispatches and helped shifting arms and ammunitions from time to time. She was also on full -time duty in the Rathfarnham Barracks during the attack om the Four Courts. Following this, she was active in South County Dublin and Wicklow (assisting forces in Blessington; scouting for the Volunteers). Her house was also used as a safe house and occasional arms dump.


Lawless Edward

 

Lawless Mary

 

Leahy Thomas

 

Ledwith Joseph

 

Hugh Lee is buried in St. Nahi’s Churchyard, Dundrum

Lee Hugh. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1899 died on the 22nd of January 1964. He was 16 years old at the time of the Rising and was born in Dublin. He was detained after the Rising being released on the 29th of May 1916. He spoke English and Irish. Received a serious wound to the right leg during the Rising and was awarded a gratuity of £40.00 by the Free State Government in February 1925. He applied for a pension under the Military Service Pensions Act 1924 and was given a pension of £32 18 schillings a year. Sometime between 1919 and 1922 he left the Volunteers and joined the Irish Citizen Army He was arrested and interned from December 1920 to December 1921 having previously been imprisoned in November 1919 for pulling down a Union Jack during Armistice celebrations. During the War of Independence he was involved in carrying despatches for W. T. Cosgrave and transporting arms. He served in the National Army from August 1922 to the end of the Civil War, serving with the Munitions section of the Quartermaster General's Department. His father Joseph Lee also served in the G.P.O. during the Rising.

 

Lee Joseph. E Company 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade (Rathfarnham) Irish Volunteers. Born on the 29th of March 1863 died on the 17th of May 1938. He was born in Dublin and was 49 years old at the time of the Rising. His son Hugh also fought in the Rising. He received a gunshot wound to the right hand on the Monday. He was detained after the Rising.


Lemass Noel

 

Lemass Sean F

 

Lundy Seumas. Part of a small garrison of 5 men who occupied the premises of Hopkins and Hopkins a silversmith on the corner of O’Connell Street and the Quays makers of the Sam Maguire Cup.

 

Diarmuid Lynch

Lynch Diarmuid. (Jeremiah Lynch) Captain, Tracton Company, Cork Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 9th of November 1950. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was born in Tracton Kinsale, County Cork. He spent 12 years in New York where he was President of the Philo-Celtic Society and of the Gaelic League, he returned to Ireland in 1907. He was sentenced to death commuted to ten years Penal Servitude, prisoner number q192. He was an American Citizen compulsorily registered in Ireland as an alien and was in January 1916 restricted to a five mile radius of Dublin. After the Rising he served as Company Commanding Officer and member of the Executive of the Irish Volunteers until his deportation to the United States of America on the 25th of April 1918. While working on I.R.A. activities in the United States he also held the position as Secretary of The Friends of Irish Freedom.

 

Lynch John

 

Lynch Martin

 

Lynch Patrick Leo. C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 2nd of June 1948, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Annesley Bridge, Fairview, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Prices Stores and Moore Street areas. Following the Easter Rising was interned until December 1916. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers and attended Thomas Ashe's funeral, attended a convention in Banba Hall and in 1918 undertook protection detail for elections. During the War of Independence alleges he took part in raids at Rotunda Rink and a raid for arms on a military train at Seville Place. He took part in raid on Income Tax Office, Beresford Place and Raheny Barracks. He was involved in raids for arms at Shamrock Lodging House, Capel Street and the Fruit Market and he was engaged in a fire fight with British forces at the London and North Western hotels. During the Truce Period he was in Kilmore camp for 2-3 months. During the Civil War he took part in the occupation of Healy's of Marlboro Street and Parnell Street and in the capture of National Army outposts at O'Connell Street, Parnell Street and Amien Street Post Office. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant, C Company, IRA during the Civil War. Arrested in December 1922 and interned until 1924. Took part in hunger strike.

 

McAuliffe Gearóid (Gearoid or Gerard McAuliffe). Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Died in 1952. Fought in the G.P.O. Interned after the Rising until October 1916. He served as Officer Commanding West Limerick Brigade IRA from the death of his predecessor Sean Finn on the 30th of March 1921 to the end of the Civil War in 1923. He was acting as Officer Commanding 1st Battalion, West Limerick Brigade as well as Adjutant West Limerick Brigade from 1918 was imprisoned in Belfast from May to October 1918. During the War of Independence in 1920 and 1921 he participated in a number of attacks on British forces including Kilmallock Barracks, Ward's Hotel, Rathkeale, Abbeyfeale, Barrigoane and Ballyhahill. During the Civil War he participated in fighting against National Army forces in Limerick, Adare, Rathkeale, Newcastle West and Abbeyfeale.

 

McCabe Kevin Joseph. Volunteer, F Company, 1st battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1889 died on the 4th of October 1970, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., North Earl Street and Gloucester Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was a member of the I.R.B. and took part in the Howth gun-running. He was mobilised on Good Friday and on Easter Saturday he was sent to Limerick by Staines where he met The O'Rahilly who ordered him to return to Dublin, he had a store of 60 shotguns at his home, most of which was delivered to Liberty Hall on Good Friday. He was deported after the surrender and after being detained in Knutsford for about six week he was sent to Frongoch, he was released from Frongoch on the 24th of December 1916. He moved to Galway in January 1917 and remained there until July 1919. He joined F Company, 2nd Battalion, I.R.A. on his return to Dublin and was involved in a raid for arms in North Malahide. He fired a number of shots at a civilian vehicle mistaken for one carrying British forces at the Malahide Road ambush in March 1921. During the Belfast boycott he warned shops on stocking goods and was on armed duty in Croke Park in November 1920 (Bloody Sunday). He took part in armed patrols on the Ballybock Road. During the Truce Period he spent two months in Coolagh Camp. He did not take part in the Civil War.


McCleane William J

 

MacCraic Michael

 

McCrea Patrick. Volunteer, B Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1883 died on the 3rd of February 1964, aged about 33 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Wakefield Prison, he was released in July 1916. He served as a Company, Battalion and Brigade Transport Officer and served as a driver for the General Headquarters Active Service Unit, the Squad, during the War of Independence. He also acted as a driver for Michael Collins during the Truce Period and the initial stages of the Civil War. He was originally attached to the Intelligence Section of the National Army but was transferred to the staff of the 2nd Eastern Division in April 1922. He resigned from the Defence Forces in March 1924 at the rank of Major.


McDermott Rory

 

MacDiarmada Sean

 

McDonagh Joseph. Irish Citizen Army. Born on the 13th of December 1877 died on the 26th of May 1950. Fought at the G.P.O. He received a shrapnel wound to the hand while fighting in the G.P.O. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford then Frongoch, he received treatment for his hand wound while detained. He took part in the Howth gun-running. He was released on the 24th of December 1916. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.. He was detained at Beggars Bush Barracks for one week during the Civil War.

 

McDonnell John

 

MacDowell Maeve C

 

McElligott J.J.

 

McEntagart John

 

McEntee Sean

 

McEvoy Dominick

 

McEvoy Thomas

 

McGallogly James (Seumas), Kimmage Garrison.

 

McGallogly John, Kimmage Garrison.


Sean McGarry
McGarry Sean (John). Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 9th of December 1958, aged about 30 years old during the Rising. Fought in Reis's Building, O'Connell Street, Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street/Lower Abbey Street, and Abbey Street. Convicted by Court Martial and sentenced to death, commuted by the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief to 8 years penal servitude, prisoner number q138. Sean McGarry was imprisoned until June 1917. Later that year he became Honorary Secretary of the Executive of the Irish Volunteers. He was arrested and interned from May 1918 until his escape from Lincoln Prison, England in February 1919. Sean McGarry joined the National Army following the outbreak of the Civil War on 28 June 1922 and served until August 1923, leaving the Defence Forces at the rank of Captain. He was a native of Dundrum County Dublin and educated in North Richmond Street School. He was an active member of the Dungannon Club in Belfast with Sean MacDermott and was also involved with the foundation of Fianna Eireann in Dublin. He was editor of the O’Donovan Rossa Souvenir and contributed many articles to the Nationalist Press.

 

McGinley Conor. Sentenced to 10 years penal servitude, 7 years remitted.

 

McGinley William (Liam McGinley). F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 23rd of October 1963, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Fairview Strand, Fairview, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Moore Lane areas. He was interned after the Rising being released in July 1916.

 

McGinley Patrick. F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 1st of August 1886 died on the 29th of April 1959, aged 29 years old during the Rising. He work as a Tailor at the time of the Rising. He fought in the Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Gilbey's, Fairview Strand, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street and 42 Upper Gloucester Street areas. Interned until August 1916. He served with the IRA during the Truce Period and with the National Army from June 1922 through to the end of the Civil War in 1923. At the outbreak of the Civil War on the 28th of June 1922 he served with the National Army in fighting against the IRA forces at the Technical School in Bolton Street. He also served in the Intelligence Department during that conflict. He was mobilised for attempted attack on Lord French, served as an intelligence officer, was a member of the IRB while also working as an organiser for the Irish Tailors and Tailoresses Union to assist in removing Irish Trade Unions from English control as well as to providing intelligence. He left the Defence Forces at the rank of Lieutenant in March 1924 his last post having been at Harepark Camp, The Curragh, County Kildare.


McGinley William. F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1893 died on the 23rd of October 1963, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Fairview Strand, Fairview, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Moore Lane areas. Interned until July 1916.  He served with the Irish Volunteers during 1918 when he was imprisoned in Belfast Jail for six months until October 1918. He took no part in the Civil War.


 

McGinn Michael Conway. F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 2nd of October 1960, aged about 19 years old during the Rising. Fought in the North Strand Road and Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street areas. Following the Easter Rising McGinn was interned until July 1916. Demobilised from the National Forces on 21 January 1924.

 

Burke Elizabeth (Lillie McGinty). Ard Craogh Branch, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1884, aged about 32 years old during the Rising. Served in the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street, Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street and Lower Abbey Street, General Post Office, O'Connell Street and Coliseum Variety Theatre, Princes Street areas. During the Easter Rising she was involved in attending the wounded in the GPO and she remembers leaving the GPO on Friday the 28th of April and going to the Coliseum Theatre, escaping through a hole in the wall. She states she was in Jervis Street on the Saturday.

 

McGrane Christopher. Emmet Sluagh, Fianna Éireann, Dublin. Born in 1898 died on the 7th or 8th of March 1966, aged about 18 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. He joined Fianna Éireann in 1912 and that he took part in the Howth gun running in 1914. He was in the surrender on Saturday and was released the following day. He assisted in reorganising Fianna Éireann. Transferred to E Company, Irish Volunteers in 1917 before transferring to H Company. In 1918 he took part in a raid for arms and in 1919 was on armed patrols. In October 1920 he was mobilised for an attempted rescue of Kevin Barry. He was arrested in November 1920 and released in December 1921. Took no further part thereafter.

 

McGrath Patrick Joseph (Junior). “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 27th of November 1967 at Hampstead Private Mental Home, Dublin, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street, General Post Office, Reis's Jewellers, Abbey Street and the Dublin Bread Company, Westmoreland Street. McGrath sustained a head wound and loss of right eye in the General Post Office, he was transferred to Jervis Street Hospital and later to the Eye and Ear Hospital before been discharged in June 1916. Re-joined the Irish Volunteers in August 1917 and took part in the usual activities. His activities were limited due to injuries sustained. He was arrested in December 1920 and interned until December 1921. Enlisted in the National Forces on the 1st of April 1922 at Beggars Bush Barracks and was discharged from the Defence Forces on 27 October 1924 at the rank of Sergeant. His father, same name, also fought in the G.P.O.

 

McGrath Patrick Joseph (Senior). “D” Company, 1st battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1876 died on the 24th of September 1940, aged about 40 years old during the Rising. He was employed by the Irish Independent Newspaper. Fought in Reis's Jewellers, Abbey Street, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street, Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street and the General Post Office. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising his employer William Martin Murphy, proprietor of the Irish Independent newspaper, used his influence to have McGrath released without having to face trial and or imprisonment. Prior to the Easter Rising and throughout the War of Independence he maintained his Company's arms dump. In 1920 he took part in the IRA burning of Raheny RIC Barracks an attack on British forces on Dorset Street and on 21 November 1920, Bloody Sunday, and took part in an attack on suspected British Intelligence agents at the Gresham Hotel, O' Connell Street, Dublin. He took part in the killing of a suspected spy at Mountjoy Square in Dublin in 1921 and mobilised for a planned city wide general IRA attack on British forces in Dublin cancelled a few days before the Truce on the 11th of July 1921. He joined the National Army and served throughout the Civil War and left the Defence Forces on 1 October 1923 while serving at the rank of Captain. His son, same name, also fought in the G.P.O.

 

McGrath Thomas

 

McGowan Seamus. Born 1874 – Died 1955. Assistant Quartermaster Irish Citizen Army. Organiser and instructor of the National Guard which was the junior wing of the Citizen Army, popularly referred to as the Citizen Army Boy Scouts, members were given instruction and lectures in Scout Craft, Military Drilling and Fire Arms, their headquarters were in Saint Joseph’s Avenue Drumcondra. Seamus McGowan was employed at Liberty Hall and as Assistant Quartermaster helped in Collecting, storing, maintenance and distribution of Citizen Army weapons, he was responsible for delivering all Citizen Army weapons and explosives to the G.P.O. on Easter Monday. He remained in the G.P.O. throughout Easter Week and took part in the evacuation too Moore Street.

Seamus McGowan was well known in the Citizen for organising Aeridheachta in Croydon Park on summer’s evenings. No Aeridheachta (open air meeting) was complete without a mock attack by Red Indians complete with war-paint, feathers and tomahawks. The use of large fires and blank ammunition made it an event not to be missed. An interesting event before the Rising involved Seamus, a sailor who had just returned from South America gave James Connolly a description of a light machine-gun which could easily be made, Seamus was given the task of producing the gun, unfortunately it was not possible, despite great efforts, to produce the gun in time for the Rising.



Seamus McGowan is buried in the churchyard of St. John the Baptist [Church of Ireland], Drumcondra, (Image John O’Grady).

Murphy Charles

 

Murphy Fintan “E” Company 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Returned to London from German July in 1914 and joined the Bermondsey Company of the Irish Volunteers. Returned to Dublin in January 1916 and lived at St. Enda’s transferring to the Rathfarnham Volunteers. In early 1916 joined the Mitchell Circle of the I.R.B., sworn in by P.H. Pearse. Took part in the manufacture of vast quantities of Buck-shot and homemade bombs at St. Enda’s in the weeks leading up to the Rising.

His Company assembled at Rathfarnham Chapel at about Noon on Easter Monday., they marched to Liberty Hall arriving about 1pm and were then sent to the G.P.O. He remained at the G.P.O. throughout the week and took part in the evacuation to Moore Street at about 8pm Friday. After the surrender at about 3pm on the Saturday he was held overnight at the Rotunda and on the Sunday morning marched to Richmond Barracks. After a day of questioning by Military Intelligence and G Men from the D.M.P. he was marched to the North Wall and loaded onto a cattle boat and shipped to Stafford Jail where he remained until August when he was transferred to Frongoch. He appeared before the Sankey Commission in September, he was released in the general release in December 1916.


Murphy Gertrude. (Catherine Gertrude Colley). Fairview Branch Attached to 2nd Battalion, Cumann na mBan. Born on the 8th of April 1893, aged 23 years old during the Rising. She became a member of Cumann na mBan on November 1915. She was a mobilisation officer in Fairview and mobilised following orders on Easter Monday. She took part in the Rising, carried messages and cooked for the Irish Volunteers. She stayed in the GPO all week. She was involved in anti-conscription work in 1917. She was in Barry's Hotel when the Four Courts were attacked and from September 1922, worked for Frank Hendersen, acting OC Dublin Brigade for Oscar Traynor, she operated the bank account and handed the money to Hendersen or nominees.

 

Murphy Kathleen

 

Murphy Martha. Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1897, aged about 19 during the Rising. She became a member of the Irish Citizen Army in 1913. She was mobilised and reported to Liberty Hall on Easter Sunday and reported there again on Monday, prepared food and attended a couple of wounded under the instructions of Dr Kathleen Lynn. She went to the GPO in the afternoon and on the Tuesday, followed a party to the Imperial Hotel. She attended to Paddy Mahon and Noel Lemass. She was arrested near the church on Marlborough Street, taken to the Custom House. At her release from Kilmainham in May she lost her work and her home and got some assistance from the National Aid. In 1917 she worked in J.J. Walsh's shop on Blessington Street and was the recipient of messages to and from Mountjoy gaol. She left this work in 1918 but retained her membership to the ICA, at which point she got married to the OC of the 2nd Battalion Michel Murphy.


Murphy Michael. Volunteer, D Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 2nd of May 1895 did on the 4th of November 1950, aged 20 years old at the time of the Rising. He fought at Fairview, the G.P.O. and the Imperial Hotel. After the surrender he was held at the Customs House for a number of days then to Richmond Barracks until the 30th of May before being deported first to Wandsworth then Woking and then to Frongoch then Wormwood Scrubs, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. . During his internment at Frongoch he was a member of the Camp Committee and played a prominent role in organising a hunger strike and the refusal of prisoners to give their names. He served through the War of Independence and took the Anti- Treaty side in the Civil War.


Murphy Michael. (Ó Murchú, Mícheál) Volunteer, (Lieutenant) B Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 26th of February 1886 died on the 5th of December 1965, aged  30 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Prince’s Street and Moore Street. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was slightly wounded on the Friday while crossing from Moore Street to Moore Lane. He was deported after the surrender first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released about the 24th of December 1916. He had no further involvement after his release from Frongoch, he did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Murphy R.J.

 

Murphy Stephen

 

Murray Eileen

 

Murray P.J.

 

Murray Thomas. “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1892 died on the 2nd of October 1962 aged about 24 years old during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, Metropole Hotel, Mansfield's and Moore Street areas. He was interned until December 1916, he joined the Volunteers in 1915.


Murtagh Francis

 

Ni Ainle, Maire

 

Ni Dhubhthaigh, Luise G.

 

Ni Foghludha, Nora

 

Ni Riain, Aine


Noone Mrs. Ellen. Cumann na mBan. Born in 1882, aged about 34 years old during the Rising. Served in the G.P.O. was not a member of Cumann na mBan during 1916 but her brother (named Lambert) and two nieces were in the Citizen Army, Nelly and Bridget Lambert, now Mrs Stynes and Mrs Doran. She was brought to the GPO to report to Miss Duffy by her nieces who were carrying messages. She was engaged in helping with the cooking and serving on a voluntary basis from Tuesday to Friday morning of Easter Week, when she was advised to leave. While leaving the GPO on the Friday, she was arrested with others on Dorset Street and was taken to the Broadstone station. She was released later on in the day and went to the "Sisters" in Henrietta Street. She was living in Milltown at the time.


Norgrove Frederick. Irish Citizen Army (Boys Corps) Young Guard of Ireland. Born in 1902 died on the 30 of October 1973, aged about 14 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O.  He was involved in carrying dispatches. He was sent home by James Connolly on Wednesday the 26th of April on account of his age. He was a member of the Citizen Army during the War of Independence. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War against National Army forces in Dublin in June and July 1922. His father George Norgrove fought in City Hall during the Rising.


Norton James

 

Nugent Michael. Volunteer, C Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 8th of October 1892 died on the 17th of October 1971, aged 23 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Abbey Street, Henry Street, the Coliseum Variety Theatre on Princes Street, the Imperial Hotel on O'Connell Street and Moore Street. At the surrender he was one of the stretcher bearers responsible for carrying James Connolly to Dublin Castle. He was deported after the surrender and detained first at Wakefield then Wormwood Scrubs and then Frongoch, he was released in September 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers after release and served up to August 1917 when he had to retire due to illness. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Nugent Patrick. Volunteer, C Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 3rd of September 1894 died on the 7th of June 1967, aged 21 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O., Moore Street and Moore Lane.  He was deported after the surrender first to Knutsford then Frongoch, he was released in December 1916. Here-joined the Volunteers on reorganisation and served throughout the War of Independence during which he was involved in an attack on a military tender. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War and joined the National Army on the 23rd of October 1922 at Portobello Barracks, he was discharged time expired on the 18th of April at the rank of Private service number 12060.

 

O Bhaonain Seamus

 

O Briain Eoghan

 

O Briain Tomas

 

O’Brien John. Convicted by Court Martial on the 8th of May and sentenced to death, commuted by the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief to 3 years penal servitude.

 

O’Brien Matt

 

O’Brien Michael

 

O Buachalla Domhnall. (Donal Buckley, Domnall Beacalla). Volunteer, Maynooth Company, Irish Volunteers. Joined the Mynooth Company of the Irish Volunteers, the Company number about 40 to 50, at the Split all but 14 went with the Redmond National Volunteers, the instructor was an ex-British Army man named O’Toole. 14 men of the Maynooth mobilised and proceeded to Dublin to join the Rising, they cycled from Maynooth to Glasnevin Cemetery where they remained undercover until nightfall and then proceeded to the G.P.O. He fought at the Exchange Hotel in Parliament Street, sniped from the glass dome of Arnott’s on Henry Street, sniped on Trinity Collage from the Dublin Bread Company and was involved in the retreat from the G.P.O. He did not go to Moore Street with the rest of the Volunteers and after wandering around Dublin for some time he was arrested at Broadstone Station on the Saturday morning. He was taken to Richmond Barracks on the Sunday morning and then to Knutsford Jail in England. He was transferred to Frongoch where he was held until a few days before Christmas 1916. He remained active with the Maynooth Volunteers throughout the War of Independence and took part in destroying bridges, made a weekly trip to Dublin with dispatches and was involved in the making of bombs and bullets. During the War of Independence he learned his house was to be raided so he burned it to the ground then claimed and got compensation from the British Government for the damage. Although he did not take an active part in the Civil War he was arrested and detained by the National Army and was on the run for some time.  He served as the last Governor General of Ireland.


O’Byrne James. “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1894 died on the 13th of November 1947, aged about 22 years old during the Rising. Served in the Metropole Hotel, Eason's O' Connell Street, General Post Office, Moore Street and Henry Place areas. Mobilised for abortive attempt to rescue Kevin Barry in 1920 and was arrested and interned from November 1920 to December 1921. Re-joining his company following his release he became Company Officer Commanding following the split in March 1922 and joined the National Army in June the same year. During the Civil War he took  part in fighting against anti-Treaty forces in Dublin, Wexford, Cork and Waterford and served as Adjutant of Tintown Internment Camp, the Curragh and with Barrack Service in Athlone. James O' Byrne left the Defence Forces in March 1924 having served at the rank of Captain.


O’Byrne James

 

O Caoimh Padraig

 

O’Carroll Kevin

 

O Ceallaigh Eamonn

 

O Cearbhail Peadar

 

O’Connell Mary

 

O’Connor James. Although not a member of the Volunteers he took food to Patrick Kilmartin who was manning a barricade on the North Circular Road Bridge. He volunteered for service and was given a shotgun and manned the barricade. He was attached to “B” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 21st of August 1899 died on the 12th of May 1947, aged 16 years old at the time of the Rising. He was on the barricade for several hours before being relieved, he then went to Mountview House with other Volunteers, he remained at Mountview until Tuesday afternoon when they evacuated the house due to shelling. He was wounded in the leg on King Street. He officially joined the IRA in April 1921. During the War of Independence he took part in a raid in Kingsbridge Station and he was mobilised for an aborted attack in North Brunswick Street he also moved arms from 4 Paul Street to Cabra. He was mobilised for an attack in Aughrim Street. In the Truce Period 12 July 1921 - 30 June 1922 he was in Mulhuddart and Blanchardstown training camps and he was garrisoned in the Four Courts. During the Civil War he was involved in fighting with National Forces at Fowler Hall and the Hammam Hotel. He was involved in a raid on a corporation yard for materials and he was mobilised the night of the bridges, August 1922, where he was arrested. He was interned until September 1923 during which time he took part in a hunger strike for 18 days.

 

O’Connor Johnny

 

O’Connor Patrick, Killed in Action

 

O’Connor Peter

 

O’Connor Sean (John known as Blimey) Kimmage Garrison. Part of a group of Volunteers involved with Fergus O’Kelly in setting up the Radio in the Wireless School and Reid’s Shop. He was an electrician by trade. He is recorded in some places as being from London and in others from Manchester, I think Blimey is more of a London slang than Manchester.

 

O Donnchadha Tomas


Elizabeth O’Farrell

O’Farrell Elizabeth.  Cumann na mBan. Born in Dublin on the 5th of November 1884 died on the 25th of June 1957, aged 31 years old during the Rising. Served in the G.P.O. and was one of the last women to leave the G.P.O. when it was evacuated. After the surrender she delivered messages between the British and Volunteers and accompanied Pearse when the surrender was delivered to General Lowe. During the Rising she delivered dispatches between the G.P.O. and many of the outposts around Dublin. She was imprisoned after the Rising, General Lowe petitioned that clemency be shown towards her for "great assistance" she had given in managing the final hours of the Rising. 


O’Gorman Liam

 

O’Hanrahan Mary. Fairview Branch, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born on the 15th  of December 1882 died on the 11th of February 1957, aged 33 years old during the Rising. Served in the G.P.O.  She served during the War of Independence and part of the Civil War. Mary O' Hanrahan was arrested and held for questioning at Broadstone Railway Station following the surrender at the end of the Easter Rising, she was released after a few hours. Throughout her service Mary O' Hanrahan provided her house as depot for arms and despatches and assisted men on the run in evading arrest. Her brothers Joseph and Edward also served during the Rising.


O’Higgins Annie

 

O’Kelly Fergus F. 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Joined the Irish Volunteers at the Rotunda Meeting. Lived in Howth at the time and was posted to the 2nd Battalion headquarters at Fairview (Croydon Park) and attached to the Signalling Company and received instruction in Morse code and semaphore. A receiving radio was constructed in order to receive a signal from the Aud or the submarine in which Casement was travelling in. His main activity during Easter Week was to get the transmitting and receiving radio in the Wireless School working, the radio apparatus at the School had been disconnected at the outbreak of WW1.

Along with six other Volunteers which included Sean O’Connor who was an electrician, Arthur Shields the well know Abbey actor and David Burk who was to be radio operator the Wireless School was occupied along with Reid’s Shop. The roof of the Wireless School was dominated by the tower of the D.B.C. (Dublin Bread Company) Luncheon Rooms restaurant, at 6-7 Lower Sackville Street (now Lower O'Connell Street). O’Kelly sent word to the G.P.O. that the D.B.C. would have to be occupied in order to ensure safe operation of the radio, a company of Volunteers was dispatched under the command of Captain Weafer, Weafer was Killed in Action while taking these buildings.

It was not possible to set up a receiving radio but a transmitting radio was successfully put into operation, although it was not possible to communicate directly with anyone it was possible to broadcast messages on the airways. Fergus O’Kelly stated that as far as he could remember the first message broadcast was to announce the Proclamation of the Irish Republic and the taking over of Dublin by the Republican Army.

The radio was kept in operation until the Wednesday afternoon when shell-fire from the Helga became so intense the position of the Radio was no longer viable. Attempts were made to bring the Radio apparatus to the G.P.O. but owing to the weight of some of the equipment this proved impossible.

 

O’Kelly Joseph

 

O’Kelly Sean T. (Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh) Born in Dublin on the 25th of August 1882 died on the 23rd of November 1966. He was educated by the Christian Brothers at O’Connell School in North Richmond Street Dublin.



Sean T O’Kelly is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery, his headstone records that he was president of Ireland from 1945 to 1959. Photo John O’Grady.

 

Macken Frank (Francis) Killed in Action.

 

Mackey Laurence (Lar,listed on some Rolls as Leo)

 

Mackey Michael

 

McLoughlin John (Johnnie) Commandant Fianna Éireann.

 

MacLaughlin Mary

 

MacMahon Patrick

 

McMahon Donal

 

McMahon Seán. Volunteer, C Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 18th of April 1921, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Abbey Street. He was deported after the surrender and detained at Wakefield, he was released about June 1916. He died at  Pidgeon House Sanatorium, Dublin. The cause of his death, tuberculosis, was directly linked to the conditions under which he was detained in Wakefield and conditions endured while on active service with his Company. He re-joined the Volunteers after release and served up to the date of his death. He joined the Volunteers in 1913.

 

McManus Patrick, Kimmage Garrison.

 

MacMullen Brian

 

McNally John. Volunteer, 5th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 10th of May 1965, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Lusk, Finglas, the G.P.O. and Moore Street.  He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was deported after the surrender first to Knutsford then Frongoch being released about the end of July 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers on released and served up to about the summer of 1920 when he was hospitalised due to bad health. He did some police duty in the summer of 1921. He died not take part in the Civil War.

 

MacNeive Liam (William McNeive and also mis-spelled McNieve) Kimmage Garrison. Lieutenant Irish Volunteers. The Liverpool Company originally drilled in premises in Duke Street Liverpool but after the landlord objected to Military Drill on his premises they moved to the basement premises of Mr.P Cahill, Scotland Road, Liverpool. Early in 1916 a mobilisation parade of the entire company was ordered in a suburb of Birkenhead, after a disagreement among the officers as to the authenticity of the signature of Sean MacDermott on the mobilisation order several of the officers left and Liam MacNeive was elected Lieutenant by the company.

 

McParland Frank

 

McPartlin Peter C

 

MacSharry M nee Fagan

 

Madden Sean

 

Maguire John. (Jack) Volunteer, Maynooth Company, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 23rd of June 1886 died on the 15th of August 1968, aged 29 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Glasnevin Cemetery Dublin, Evening Mail Newspaper Office Parliament Street, the G.P.O. and Coliseum Variety Theatre Princes Street. He joined the Volunteers early in 1914. He was detained after the surrender and deported first to Stafford Jail and then to Frongoch being released on Christmas Eve 1916. He re-joined the Volunteers and fought throughout the War of Independence, he was involved in the destruction of Maynooth Barracks in the early part of 1920 and was on outpost duty during attacks on Maynooth Town Hall, Leixlip, Donadea and Celbridge Barracks and was also involved in the destruction of roads, bridges and Leinster House and Maynooth Railway Station. Although his house was used as a safe house and he took part in Drill and Training during the Civil War he did not take part in any fighting.

 

Matthew Maguire. Maynooth Company, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1884 died on the 11th of May 1947, aged about 32 years old during the Rising. Fought along-side his brother John (see above) during the Rising. He was interned after the Rising but due to his death in 1947 full details of his interment and subsequent War of Independence and Civil War service are not available.

 

Mahon Patrick

 

Mahon Patrick Joseph. “F” Company 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Born on the 13th of March 1896 died on the 20th of July 1965, aged 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Leinster Avenue, Annesley Bridge, Fairview, Gilbey's, Fairview Strand, Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street and the Cathedral Street areas. Following his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising Patrick Mahon was interned until December 1916. From 1918 he served in the 2 Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers and IRA machine gun section as well as assisting in the printing and publication of the An t-Óglach newspaper. Arrested in November 1920 by British forces he was imprisoned until May 1921. At the outbreak of the Civil War in June 1922 and while fighting was ongoing in Dublin, Patrick Mahon, acting at the direction of the National Army Adjutant General Gearóid O’ Sullivan, later Secretary to the Board of Assessors, Military Service Pensions Act, 1924, oversaw the printing of a daily edition of An t-Óglach on behalf of the Government forces.


 

Mahon Thomas

 

Makapaltis Tony. On the Monday afternoon of the Rising Makapaltis from Finland and a Swedish man turned up at the G.P.O. and offered to fight for the Rebels. Captain Liam Tannam talked to the two men, the Swede could talk no English. Makapaltis told Tannam they wanted to fight for Ireland because like Ireland Finland and Sweden were small countries threatened by a much larger country, Russia. Tannam admitted the two men, the Swede was given a rifle and the Finn a shotgun and they were posted to the front right section of the G.P.O. Both men remained in the G.P.O. until the surrender and were captured by the British, the Swede was released almost immediately when the Swedish Consul intervened on his behalf. Makapaltis was detained in Kilmainham Jail and later transferred to Knutsford on the 3rd of May, he is recorded in the Irish Times Handbook of the Sinn Fein Rising as being detained in Knutsford as Makapaltis Antli Russian Belfast Seaman, his release date is recorded as the 2nd of June as Makapaltis Antle Zecks Finland.

 

Malone Jeramiah J (Jerry) also known as Coghlan Joseph. Kimmage Garrison.

 

Mangan Thomas

 

Manning Henry (Harry). Shot through the foot while attempting to retreat from O’Connell Street in the early hours of Friday morning. Part of a group of Volunteers attempting to break out of the British cordon around O’Connell Street. These men had been in various positions including The Imperial Hotel and surrounding buildings. Frank Thornton had taken the first group but and Seamus Daly was to lead the second group 10 minutes later. Some of the first group did not make it through the cordon and were forces to retreat into the Pro-Cathedral. When they reached the intersection between Railway Street and Gardiner Street they came under heavy fire.

 

Mapother Máire. Ard Craobh, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1891 died on the 16th of November 1979, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Reis's Building and Hibernian Bank areas. Evaded capture following her participation in the 1916 Easter Rising.


Mairé Louis. “B” Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1900 died on the 1st of September 1957, aged about 16 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Magazine Fort, Phoenix Park, Liberty Hall, Beresford Place, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Annesley Bridge, Fairview and Moore Street areas. He was interned after the Rising being released in June 1916. He acted as a despatch carrier between Ireland, England and the United States of America. He served with Fianna Éireann and the IRA in Dublin and Liverpool - Edmond O'Brien states that Marie was among those acting as guard for himself and James Scanlan in Liverpool following their escape there after the Knocklong train rescue in May 1919. Marie ceased his activities between March 1920 and March 1922 as he was conscripted into the French Army. Louis Marie continued to serve with the Defence Forces until retiring with effect on 26 January 1929 while serving as Captain Adjutant 15 Battalion. Louis Marie re-joined the Defence Forces during the Second World War serving from 1940 to 1952.


Mason Thomas

 

McCormack James, Killed in Action.

 

Meagher Patrick. “B” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 17th of December 1877 died on the 8th of December 1952, aged 39 years old during the Rising. After the Rising he was detained until July 1916. Fought in the Blackhall Place, General Post Office and Moore Street areas. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers upon release and that he carried out the usual activities. He took part in the Armagh elections and during the War of Independence he was on outpost duty during a raid on the Independent Newspaper Offices. He took part in armed patrols in O'Connell Street and Henry Street. He was involved in the Findlaters Place ambush and in a raid on the Midland Hotel and he was mobilised for an aborted ambush in Parnell Street. During the Truce Period, 12 July 1921 - 30 June 1922, he attended Mulhuddart training camp. During the Civil War he was garrisoned in Fowler Hall and Barry's Hotel and Hammam Hotel.


Milroy Séan. 2nd Battalion, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1877 in England died on the 30th of November 1946, aged about 39 years old during the Rising. He joined the Volunteers in 1913. He was interned until December 1916 following his capture by British forces on Saturday 29 April. He was interned by the British several times for his activities during the War of Independence. He was a member of the First Dáil, he was Sinn Fein Director of Organisation from 1918 and adviser on Ulster to the Irish delegation during the negotiations for the Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1921 and a member of the Senate of the Irish Free State.

 

Mooney Patrick

 

Moore Edward J

 

Mulcahy Mary J

 

Andrew Mulligan

Mulligan Andrew. (Andy, Dazzler). Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1877 died on the 5th of September 1942, aged about 39 years old during the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and in Moore Street.  He brought the type that printed the Proclaimation from West’s of Capel Street to Liberty Hall. He was a coal carter and was assistant caretaker to Peter Ennis at Liberty Hall. He was deported after the surrender to Knutsford Prison, he was released in August 1916. He re-joined the Citizen Army after release and served up to about the time of the funeral of Thomas Ashe. He did not take part in the War of Independence or the Civil War.


Mulvey W.P.

 

Mulvihill Michael, Kimmage Garrison. Killed in Action.

 

Nunan Ernest. Came from London as part of the Kimmage Garrison. Fought in the G.P.O. He was deported ending up in Frongoch but unlike many of his comrades he was not released but, with his brother Earnest,  taken from Frongoch and handed over to the Military Authorities as absentees from Military Service. Both brother were Court Martialled on several occasions for disobeying orders and served several terms of Hard labour in Exeter and other jails in England. Released on the 27th of February 1917 they were discharged from the British Army as Services No Longer Required. Both brothers were enthusiastic students of the Irish language and both accomplished Irish musicians and dancers. On the evening of Saint Patrick’s Day 1917 both brothers and their father received a standing ovation from fellow Gaelic Leaguers at the Annual Irish Music Festival held in London.


Nunan John. Came to Dublin with the Kimmage Garrison, fought in the G.P.O. Brother of Earnest Nunan, see above for details.


Ó Donnchadha Tomás (O’Donoghue O'Donohoe). Fought in the G.P.O. and was a member of the Kimmage Garrison. He was a prominent member of the Gaelic League in London. He was arrested in Galway some time after the Rising and was handed over to the Military for service in the British Army and after a memorable struggle against conscription released.


O'Keeffe Patrick (ÓCaoimh, Pádraig) (AKA Paudeen) F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 3rd of July 1881 died on the 21st of September 1973, aged 24 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the Imperial Hotel on O'Connell Street and in the G.P.O. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. He was interned until December 1916. In 1917 he held the position of Secretary of Sinn Féin. Between September and October 1919 he was held in Mountjoy Prison. He enlisted in the National Forces at Portobello Barracks on the 13th of July 1922 and resigned on the 14th of August 1923 at the rank of Commandant. He held the position of Deputy Military Governor, Mountjoy Prison between his dates of enlistment in the National Forces.


O’Mahony Eamon J

 

O’Mahony Matthew

 

Oman George. Citizen Army. On Easter Monday morning he was sent to Royal Barracks to watch and report any troops movements.

 

O’Moore Donough

 

O Mordha Padraig

 

O Murchadha Peadar

 

O Murchu Miceal

 

O’Neill Wicks Arthur, Killed in Action.

 

O’Neill James. “A” Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1890 died on the 25th of July 1954, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, Moore Street and Cole's Lane areas. He took part in the attack on the Custom House 25 May 1921 and in fighting in Dublin at outbreak of Civil War on the Anti-Treaty side until his arrest on 29 July 1922. He was subsequently interned until June 1923.


O'Neill John. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Died on the 30th of January 1958. Fought at the G.P.O. and Moore Street. He was deported after the surrender, he was held in Richmond Barracks Dublin until the end of May then deported serving time in Wandsworth Frongoch and Reading Jail, he was home on parole for Christmas when the general release was announced so he had to return to Reading Jail on the Friday after Christmas to get his official release. He was employed at Liberty Hall and was Secretary of Number 1 Branch of the Irish Transport and General Workers Union. He served throughout the War of Independence and was Parish Judge of the Republican Courts. He did not take part in the Civil War.

 

O'Neill John. Volunteer, Irish Volunteers. Died on the 6th of March 1924. Fought in the G.P.O. He died for heart trouble which was not attributed to any military service.  

 

O’Neill Maura (Máire). Nee Gibney. Ard Craobh Branch, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born 1898, aged about 17 years old during the Rising. Although not a member of Cumann na mBan at the time of the Rising she volunteered during Easter Week and served at the G.P.O. until the Friday of the Rising delivering dispatches. She left the GPO on Friday and was arrested as she was on her way towards Jervis St Hospital with Bridie Connolly. Until 1920, she followed the usual training and had custody of papers for Dick McKee and Michael Collins. She kept those papers until November 1920. She carried weapons and also kept bombs in her house. In June 1922 she went to Parnell Square HQ Irish National Volunteers where she met Frank Henderson and Oscar Traynor. She affirms that she remained at that post until the evacuation. She helped carrying ammunition to Capel Street and helped dump some guns in Dominick Street, a lane opposite the Duke of Leinster's House. Because of her dispatch work, she was more in touch with IRA officers and was not under direct orders from Cumann na mBan officers. She was arrested in May 1923 and released from Kilmainham Jail in September or the beginning of October 1923.


 

O’Neill Seamus

 

O Nunain Sean

 

O’Rahilly The, Killed in Action.

 

O Raogain Liam

 

O’Reilly Cathleen


O’Reilly Nora (Sister Lourdes, she was a Nun, not sure if she was a Nun at the time of the Rising). Central Branch, Cumann na mBan. Died on the 28th of January 1989. Served in the Hibernian Bank, O'Connell Street, Leinster Bank, General Post Office, O'Connell Street. Rendered First Aid and carried dispatches while under fire. Continued membership of Cumann na mBan after the Rising, no details of War of Independence or Civil War service. She was a Nun in the U.S.A. at the time of her Pension Application.

 

O’Reilly J.K.

 

O’Reilly John

 

O’Reilly Joseph. Colonel, London Battalion, Kimmage Garrison. Born in 1893 died on the 8th of August 1943, aged about 23 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. Interned until December 1916. From 1917 he served as Chief Courier and member of the personal staff of Michael Collins, until the latter's death on 22 August 1922. Later he served on the personal guard of William T. Cosgrave, President of the Executive Council and then as Aide de Camp to Cosgrave from July 1923. Fought during the War of Independence and on the Pro-Treaty side during the Civil War. He joined the Free State army resigning from the Defence Forces at the rank of Colonel on 5 March 1932.


O’Reilly Michael William Captain Irish Volunteers(December 1889 – November 1971), born Stillorgan County Dublin educated by the Christian Brother in Stillorgan national school. Joined the I.R.B. in 1911 and the Irish Volunteers on the night of their formation on the night of the 25 of November 1913 at the Rotunda Dublin. He served as Captain of F Company 2nd Battalion and later Deputy Adjutant of the Dublin Brigade. He was appointed Aide de Camp to Joseph Mary Plunkett on Easter Monday 1916, he fought in the G.P.O., helped to evacuate the wounded and provided his hanky which was used as the white flag for the surrender. After the Rising he was interned in England, he was released on Christmas Eve 1916.

 

O’Reilly Thomas




Seamas O Riain born 6th of December 1892 died 25th of September 1970.
Image John O'Grady


O Riain Seamas (Dr. Jim Ryan). A native of County Wexford, medical officer in the G.P.O. during the Rising and along with James Connolly was one of the last to leave the ruins. He was interned in Stafford Jail and Frongoch after the Rising. He fought during the War of Independence, Brigade Commandant South Wexford, arrested by the British in 1919 he served time on Spike Island and Beare Island. Elected Sinn Fein candidate for Wexford South in the 1918 election he attended the First Dail 21st January 1919. Voted against the Treaty and was imprisoned during the Civil War.

 

O’Sullivan Gearoid (Jeremiah). Born on the 28th of January 1891 in Coolnagurrane near Skibbereen in County Cork. He was given the name Jeremiah but was always known as Gearóid. Member of the I.R.B. and raised the tri-colour over the G.P.O. during the Rising. At 25 years old he was the youngest I.R.B. officer fighting in the G.P.O. He was chosen by rebellion leader Seán Mac Diarmada to serve as his aide-de-camp. Interned in Frongoch after the Rising. Fought in the War of Independence, Adjutant General of the Irish Republican Army, and had a bounty of £3,500 on his head. 1922 elected Sinn Fein TD for Carlow-Kilkenny. Pro-Treat adjutant general in the National Army. Died on the 25th of March 1948.

 

O’Sullivan James. A printing compositor, employed by the Gaelic Press, who assisted in printing the Irish War News during the Rising. The Irish War News was printed at the premises of James O’Keeffe’s Printing Plant in Halston Street.

 

O'Sullivan James J. Staff Officer, General Headquarters, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 26th of February 1974, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. He joined the Volunteers at the Rotunda at the inaugural meeting in November 1913. He took part in the Howth Gun-Running. Following his participation in the 1916 Rising he was sentenced to death by a British Army Court Martial, commuted to Penal Servitude for eight years. He was released in June 1917. Rearrested in July 1917 he was imprisoned in Belfast, Mountjoy and Dundalk prisons before being released in September 1917. During this period of imprisonment he took part in a hunger strike and was forcibly fed on a number of occasions. During the War of Independence while living in Limerick he was active in an intelligence capacity for the Irish Volunteers and IRA providing information to Michael Collins and other GHQ members on members of the British forces, he mobilised for an aborted attempt to kill a British officer named Deasy in Limerick. He took no part in the Civil War.


O’Sullivan Laura Daly

 

O’Tool William

 

Parnell Matthew. “F” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Fought in the Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street. Born in 1899, was about 16 years old at the time of the Rising. He was injured during the Rising when trying to escape capture from the burning Imperial Hotel he jumped from a widow twenty feet from the ground. His mother made a claim to the Irish government in 1924 that he died as a result of the injuries received during his escape attempt. He joined the Volunteers in October 1915 and was a member until July 12th 1918. He was detained after the Rising at Richmond Barracks until May 8th after which he was transferred to Wandsworth Detention Barracks London arriving there on the 9th of May 1916.

 

Pearse P.H.

 

Pearse William

 

Pedlar Liam. Irish Volunteers. Born in 1886 died on the 29th of December 1963, aged about 30 years old during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street and Moore Street areas. In the weeks immediately prior to 1916 Liam Pedlar travelled from the United States of America to Ireland with information from Joseph McGarrity for the Irish Volunteers General Headquarters regarding the arms to be landed by the Aud. In that same time he also travelled between Ireland and Scotland communicating plans for the planned operations to Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) and Irish Volunteer leadership in Scotland. Following the surrender Pedlar was interned until December 1916. Liam Pedlar was again arrested and deported to England between February and June 1917. From February 1918 he served as an Irish Volunteer Company Commanding Officer. In May the same year he was arrested and imprisoned for six months and in September 1919 was deported first to England and then to the United States of America. Between late 1919 and June 1922 Pedlar served principally in the U.S.A. with the Irish Republican Mission as Personal Attaché to Eamon De Valera and later as Military Attaché. However he also travelling between the U.S.A. and Ireland during that period and assisting in the transportation of arms and despatches, particularly the efforts to smuggle Thompson Machine Guns from the U.S.A. to Ireland in 1921. On his permanent return to Ireland in June 1922 Liam Pedlar took part in the fighting against National Army forces in Dublin at the outbreak of the Civil War serving throughout that conflict first as Assistant Quartermaster General and later as Quartermaster General of the IRA.



John Plunkett

Plunkett John. (Jack). Headquarters Engineering Staff. Irish Volunteers. Fought in the G.P.O. He was a brother of Joseph Mary Plunkett executed leader of the 1916 Rising. He was 18 years old at the time of the Rising. He was an engineering student at the National University at the time of the Rising. He was Court Martialled and sentenced to death which was commuted to ten years penal servitude. After the trial he was held in Kilmainham and then Mountjoy were he remained for a few days before being deported first to Portland Prison Dorset England where he remained for six months, he was then transferred to Lewis Jail about the 10th of June 1917he was transferred to Parkhurst Prison on the Isla of White where he was held for about eight days before being transferred to Pentonville where he was held overnight and released the next day. His prison number was q153. His brother Seoirse (George) was with him throughout his time in all English Jails and also served with him at the G.P.O. during the Rising. He served throughout the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War.    


Plunkett Joseph Mary.


Plunkett Seoirse. (George). Fought in the G.P.O., he was a brother of Joseph Mary executed for his part in the Rising and brother of John Plunkett who also fought in the G.P.O. during Easter Week. He was a student studying dentistry at the National University Dublin and also a member of the College Pipers Club. He was sentenced to death commuted to ten years penal servitude, prison number q152, held in the same prisons as his brother John (see above) he was released in June 1917. On the night of the 28th of April 1916 while fighting his way down Moore Street he was sheltering from heavy gunfire when a wounded Dublin Fusilier cried out for water, braving the heavy fire he took a water bottle to the injured soldier and helped him to back to the safety of a house on Moore Street.  


Poole Vincent. Irish Citizen Army. (In some records he is referred to as Captain in other Private). Born in 1880 died on the 25th of June 1955, aged about 36 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He was born in Denmark Street Dublin and was a member of the Transport Union, he worked as a Dublin Corporation labourer. He was the father of four young children at the time of the Rising. He was sentenced to death commuted to ten years Penal Servitude. Due to ill health he did not take part in the War of Independence and took the Anti-Treaty side during the Civil war, he fought at the Four Courts for about a week. He left the Citizen Army in 1920 and joined the I.R.A. He was imprisoned after the fall of the Four Courts being released from Mountjoy at the end of the year.


Price Leslie (de Barra Leslie, Barry Mrs. Tom) Attached to 1st Battalion, Ard Craobh Branch (Central Branch), Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Cooked meals and while assisting the men in the Hibernian Bank she witnessed the death of Thomas Weafer. As she stood beside Weafer a bullet whizzed past her and hit Weafer in the stomach. As she was about to help Weafer another bullet hit another Volunteer who had already gone to Weafer’s aid. She had just enough time to whisper a prayer in Weafer’s ear before he died. She went on to marry Tom Barry of the 3rd Cork Brigade. she joined Cumann na mBan in 1914 and was mobilised on Good Friday 1916 and on the Monday was mobilised for Mountjoy Street and then was sent to the GPO and the Hibernian Bank. She carried dispatches between the GPO and Church/King Street area. She was arrested on the Friday as some Cumann na mBan members were asked to leave the GPO. She was led to the Broadstone Station and was released on the same afternoon. Following this, she rendered service in North County Dublin. She was elected to the Cumann na mBan Executive in 1917, became Director of Organisation and travelled the country in order to recruit members. She was involved in the creation and development of branches in Castletownbere, Eyeries, Ardgroom and Adrigole. Between 1918 and 1921, she organised units in each of the battalion and connected each branch with the local IRA units, organised first-aid classes, despatch systems, She remained a member of the Executive and continued her work until the 1921 Convention. She was then active in Cork but came back to Dublin before the start of the Civil War. She reported to Oscar Traynor at Barry’s Hotel on the morning of the attack on the Four Courts.


 

Price Sean “B” Company 1st Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Joined the Irish Volunteers in 1915, the Company Paraded on Monday nights at 41 Parnell Square Dublin. Became a member of the I.R.B. about six months after joining the Volunteers, he was sworn in by Sean MacDermott. Late Easter Sunday evening he was ordered to Liberty Hall where he remained until Easter Monday morning, after mobilising his section they assembled in the Gaelic Hall Blackhall Place shortly before noon. On Monday and Tuesday he manned the barricade at the Railway Bridge Cabra, on Wednesday afternoon after the barricade came under heavy shelling the position was evacuated, after spending the night in a hay shed in Finglas the group made their way to the G.P.O. on Thursday. He remained at the G.P.O. until the evacuation when he assisted with the removal of the wounded James Connolly, helping to carry the stretched across Henry Street into Henry Place, he remained in Moore Street until the surrender. After grounding arms outside the Gresham Hotel he was held overnight in the open ground at the Rotunda. After spending the night in the open they were marched to Richmond Barracks and that night taken by boat to Stafford Prison and then to Frongoch. He was released from Frongoch at Christmas 1916.

 

Purcell Charles. “C” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 8th of February 1893 died on the 16th of May 1970, aged 26 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. He was interned until December 1916 serving time in Frongoch. Enlisted in the National Forces on 21 May 1922 at Wellington Barracks, service number 13138. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was sent as a gunner to the Four Courts to block the entrance gates. He was discharged from the Defence Forces on 24 March 1924 at the rank of Corporal.

 

Quinn Margaret

 

Rafferty Mrs Mary Josephine nee Walsh. Member of the Executive, Dublin South City area, Inghinidhe Branch, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1890, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. Fought in the General Post Office. was mobilised on 23 April 1916 and helped with first aid and attended the wounded at the GPO until the surrender. She was not arrested after the Rising. She helped organise a branch in Ardee, Louth 1917-1918. She continued her involvement with the organisation following Easter Week and was appointed joint treasurer of the Cumann na mBan Executive (she was a member of the Executive from 1914 to 1918. Between 1918 and 1919 she was involved in anti-conscription activities , propaganda and in election work and general branch work. She also did work for the National Aid fund.


Rankin Patrick

 

Redmond Andy

 

Redmond Annie

James Redmond

Redmond James. “E” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in Dublin in 1893 he died from a severe attack of pneumonia on the 9th of October 1918 just three weeks after his marriage. He worked for the L.N.W. Railway. He was educated at Saint Lawrence O’Toole’s and O’Connell Christian School. He was a member of the O’Toole’s G.A.A. club and the Pipers’ Band. He fought in Fairview and the G.P.O. being badly injured in the retreat to Moore Street. He was deported to Knutsford and then to Frongoch, he was released in July 1916.


Reid John

 

Reilly Matthew

 

Reynolds John R. Auditor for the Irish Volunteers. He was held in Kilmainham Jail for a week before being tried on the 8th of May he was acquitted and released. He told his Court Martial that he had gone to the G.P.O. on the Monday to buy stamps and was arrested and held prisoner by the Volunteers. His daughter Molly Reynolds who served with Cumann na mBan, claimed she had gone to the G.P.O. to find her father and was also arrested and held by the Volunteers.

 

Reynolds Molly (Mary Catherine). Inghinidhe na hEireann branch of Cumann na mBan Harcourt Street, joined some weeks after the formation of this branch, in May 1915 she helped set up the Caithlin ni Houlihan branch which met in the Father Mathew Park Fairview which was also the H.Q. of the 2nd Battalion of the Irish Volunteers. As well as the usual activities of First Air, Signalling, Drill and marching the women of Cumann na mBan also received instruction in how to clean, cool and load a rifle.

She helped store some of the Howth Guns under the floor of her Father’s office in Number 1 College street, he father was John R. Reynolds who also took part in the Rising. On Easter Monday morning she helped issue the Mobilisation order for her father’s company, notifying the members in Clontarf, when she returned to her home her own Mobilisation orders were waiting for her and with another member of her branch she arrived at Stephen’s Green. Unable to locate other members of Cumann na mBan she waited around until the arrival of Margaret Skinnider and informed both women that women volunteers were needed in the G.P.O.

On arriving at the G.P.O. the two women met the O’Rahilly who Molly Reynolds knew well as he had been a frequent visitor to her father. The O’Rahilly helped the two women select the best place for the First Aid Station at the back of the main hall of the G.P.O. She helped treat James Connolly when he received a bullet wound to the left shin, his leg was set in splints and a waste paper basket was cut in two to make a cage for it.

On the Friday evening, with the Red Cross men and women and the wounded except Connolly, prisoners and Father Flanagan, she was evacuated from the G.P.O. towards Arnott’s through holes in the walls that had been made by the Volunteers during the week in an attempt to get the wounded to Jervis Street Hospital. They made it to Liffey Street when they halted, Father Flanagan and the prisoners, one a British Medical Officer, went off to make arrangements for the wounded to be admitted to the Hospital, Fr. Flanagan returned with an Officer and a number of Soldiers and escorted the party to the Hospital. On arrival at the Hospital the Red Cross men were arrested as were those with minor wounds, the women were allowed wait in the dispensary waiting room where they stayed the remainder of Friday night and most of Saturday. On Saturday evening Fr. Flanagan arrived and told them that the Volunteers had surrendered and they should go home.

 

Reynolds Peter J

 

Richards Bridie. Central Branch [Ard Craobh] Dublin IRA Brigade area, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1891 died on the 3rd of January 1970, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Employed as a School teacher in Gardiner's Street Convent National School. Served in the Hibernian Bank, O' Connell Street and G.P.O. She joined Cumann na mBan in 1915, was mobilised on Easter Monday and instructed to go to the Priory in Dominik Street. The following day, she was sent to the Hibernian Bank before being sent to the GPO where she was mainly involved in cooking and attended the wounded. She joined Columcille Branch in 1917.


Ridgeway Harry

 

Ring Christopher

 

Ring Joseph

 

Ring Patrick

 

Robinson Seamus. Irish Volunteers. Part of a small garrison of 5 men who occupied the premises of Hopkins and Hopkins a silversmith on the corner of O’Connell Street and the Quays makers of the Sam Maguire Cup. Was a Senior Officer IV and IRA, Tipperary, 1917 - 1921. Joined the “Oscars” Hurling Club in Belfast in 1903, the “Oscars” was started by Bulmer Hopson in 1902. Informally joined the Irish Volunteers in Glasgow in 1913. Was a member of the Kimmage Garrison and came from Glasgow to Dublin in February 1916.

 

Roche Thomas. Volunteer, E Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1891 died on the 15th of March 1969, aged about 25 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at Bishop Street, Church Street, Father Matthew Hall and the G.P.O. He was at the G.P.O. until the Wednesday then around the Four Courts area including guarding prisoners at Father Matthew Hall. He was arrested after the surrender at his place of work at the Corporation markets. He was first taken to the Bridewell and then to Dublin Castle, he was released after giving an undertaking he would have no further involvement in the Volunteers. He returned to his Company and served up to the signing of the Treaty. He took the Pro-Treaty side in the Civil War joining the National Army on the 1st of July 1922 and served up to the 7th of April 1923 when he was discharge medically unfit. Army service number 2591.

 

Roche William


Rogers Sarah. (Sorcha Bhean Mhic Ruaidhri MacMahon). Member of the Executive, Ard-Craobh Branch, Dublin Area, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1888 aged about 28 years old during the Rising. Served in the General Post Office, Four Courts, King's Inns Quay and Father Matthew Hall, Church Street areas. She joined Cumann na mBan in 1914, was Honorary Secretary and Officer in charge, she resigned, and was a member of the Executive from 1914 to 1919. During Easter Week, she spent Monday to Thursday between the GPO, the Four Courts and the Father Matthew Hall, carrying messages. She also worked with Mrs Clarke, employed fulltime on the Volunteers Dependants' Fund. Around 1918 she was asked by Michael Collins to cut her connection with the Cumann na mBan Executive and do work for him, she continued this work until the Truce.


Rossiter Cathleen. (Cathleen Mallin). Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born between 1889 and1901 aged about 16 during the Rising. Prior to Easter Week 1916 she maintained an arms dump for the Irish Citizen Army and that during the week of 23 to 29 April 1916 she assisted with cooking and first aid preparations at Liberty Hall and carried despatches for her brother Michael Mallin. During the War of Independence she was a member of Cumann na mBan and stored arms for her brothers Bartle and John Mallin and gave first aid to Bartle after he was wounded during an attack on British forces at Dartry Road in June 1921. Subject took no part in the Civil War. She was refused a pension for her services.


Roth Thomas

 

Ryan Oliver

 

Ryan Phyllis




Ryan Thomas. A printing compositor, employed by the Gaelic Press, who assisted in printing the Irish War News during the Rising. The Irish War News was printed at the premises of James O’Keeffe’s Printing Plant in Halston Street.

 

Saurin Charles. “F” Company 2nd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers, aged 20 at the time of the Rising. Joined the Volunteers on the 30th of July 1914 aged 18. Paraded weekly in Father Matthew Park on Thursday night and Saturday afternoons in Andy Kettle’s field on Puckstown Road, Donnycarney. At the time of the split the Company numbered about 140, 80 sided with the Redmondite National Volunteers.

He spent Holy Week prior to Easter Monday at ‘Cluny’ the home of Seamus Daly in Clontarf making hand-grenades and assembling homemade bayonets for the American Shotguns. On Easter Monday he mobilised at Father Matthew Park and while his Column made its way towards the City and the G.P.O. they encountered about 100 British Troops in the Newcomen Bridge area, shots were exchanged and his Column came under heavy machinegun fire. After this exchange of fire the Column proceeded to the G.P.O. arriving around 7pm.

On arriving at the G.P.O. the Column was immediately ordered to Richmond Road were, as part of a small party under the command of Lieutenant Joe Tallon of “C” Company he was stationed in McCabe’s Public house, he remained at this position until late Tuesday night early Wednesday morning when the whole Column occupying the area were ordered to evacuate to the G.P.O. On arriving at the G.P.O. he received serious cuts to his right hand when attempting to gain entry and was also hit by a bullet in the right hand.

After the surrender he was detained overnight at the Rotunda and then transferred to Richmond Barracks, he ended up in Frongoch Wales.

Scollan John Joseph Commandant Hibernian Rifles. Born in South Shields England he was 40 years old at the time of the rising and worked as a printing compositor. His mother was from County Fermanagh. He came from Derry to Dublin in 1911 after a meeting of the Ancient Order of Hibernians (A.O.H.) American Alliance in Dundalk where he was appointed National Director of the Hibernian Rifles. The Hibernian Rifles paraded as usual on Easter Sunday in North Frederick Street and although Scollan has seen the countermanding order from McNeill he felt something was up and ordered his men to parade again on Easter Monday.

On Easter Monday Scollan with about 60 men paraded at the hall in Frederick Street and some time soon after noon they received word that the Volunteers had taken the G.P.O. He addressed his men informing them that although he thought the fight was unofficial the Hibernian Rifles should play there part and join the Rising. Any man that did not wish to fight was free to go home, about 30 men remained and Scollan sent word to James Connolly at the G.P.O. that he was ready with assistance and was awaiting orders. Scollan received orders from Connolly about midnight on Easter Monday to proceed to the G.P.O.

On arriving at the G.P.O. the Hibernian Rifle men were ordered to barricade the upper windows, instructed by The O’Rahilly the did this. About 6am on the Tuesday he received orders to go to the Exchange Hotel, along with 18 of his own men and 9 Maynooth men they proceeded via the halfpenny bridge where the toll man demanded a halfpenny from each one, the toll man did not get his halfpenny. They arrived at the Exchange Hotel and occupying the roof the fired on the British Troops occupying City Hall, these Troops had Volunteers pinned down in the offices of the Evening Mail. They came under heavy and sustained attack from units of the Irish Fusiliers and Enniskilling Fusiliers, these attacks were repelled inflicting heavy causalities on the British Troops. At 4.30pm they received orders to return to the G.P.O.

Scollan spent a relatively quiet Tuesday night in the G.P.O. On the Thursday morning he received orders from Connolly to go to Broadstone Railway Station to find out what conditions were like there. As he was going up the steps of the station he was challenged and taken prisoner by a British Soldier, he was held overnight at Broadstone Station and the next day taken to Ship Street Barracks where he was held for 8 days, no bedding was supplied and food consisted of Bully Beef, hard biscuits and tea. He was then taken to Arbour Hill and from there to Richmond Barracks. After questioning at Richmond Barracks he was taken by Cattle Boat to England and detained in Wandsworth Prison. In July 1916 he was moved to Frongoch where he was held until the 30th of October when he was transferred to Reading Jail. He was released on Christmas Eve 1916, on release he returned to Dublin.

 

Savage Martin.  He was a Volunteer with the 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers and fought in the G.P.O. He was born in 1898 and was Killed in Action during the War of Independence. He was aged about 18 years old at the time of the Rising.


Scullin Francis, Injured by a bullet wound to the leg when with a group of 15 to 20 Volunteers they went to re-occupy the Hibernian Bank. Coming under heavy machine gun fire the group attempted to return to the G.P.O. during which Scullin was wounded.

 

Scullin Patrick


Seely Patrick Joseph. (Sealy) “D” Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1894-1895 died on the 27th of February 1972 aged about 21 or 22 years old during the Rising.



James Seville is buried in Glasnevin

Seville James. Volunteer, F Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 17th of December 1961, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the G.P.O. and the Dublin and Wicklow Manure Works in Fairview, Dublin. He did not receive a mobilisation order on the Monday but heard shots coming from the City and with some of his company they gathered and reported to the G.P.O. He was posted to the Dublin and Wicklow Manure Works in Fairview on the Tuesday but had to return to the G.P.O. that evening due to heavy fighting. He avoided arrest after the surrender and was on the run for several months. He served during the War of Independence and was arrested in February 1921 on O’Connell Street by the Military accompanied by a Police Detective carrying a photo of him in Volunteer uniform. He was detained first in Arbour Hill then the Curragh. He was released on parole March 1921 when his sister was shot and killed when a British Army lorry was ambushed on Sackville Street, the occupants of the lorry returned fire and his sister was caught in the crossfire. He served up to the cease fire in July 1921. He did not take part in the Civil War.



Sexton James, “C” Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1093 died on the 5th of December 1984, aged about 23 years during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. James Sexton was interned from November 1920 to December 1921 and during the Civil War acted as an IRA Company Intelligence Officer against the National Army forces in Dublin.

 


Frank Sheridan's posthumous medal was presented to his daughter.

Francis (Frank) Sheridan. E Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Fought in the G.P.O. He was born in 1863 he died on the 26th of November 1916, he was aged about 53 at the time of the Rising. He joined the Volunteers at their inaugural meeting at the Rotunda in 1913. On the Tuesday of the Rising he was sent to see a wounded Volunteer at a local hospital when he collapsed, he was detained at the hospital overnight for treatment and returned to the G.P.O. on the Wednesday. Although advised to go home to recover he insisted on remaining and helped to treat wounded comrades. He was detained at Richmond Barracks after the surrender, he was released in June 1916 due to ill health. He lived at Castle View Terrace, Rathfarnham, Dublin and died suddenly in November 1916. The date of his death is recorded as the 29th of November in the Catholic Bulletin (February 1918) and as the 26th of November in the application for his medal. He is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.


Sheridan James.  “D” Company, 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1888 died on the 24th of June 1947, aged about 28 years old during the Rising. Fought in the Kimmage, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, and Moore Street areas. Following the Easter Rising Sheridan was interned until June 1916. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers in January 1917. During the War of Independence he was involved in a raid for arms at Mount Jerome and in January 1921 an attack on RIC at Terenure Road. During the Civil War he was involved in armed patrols, attacks on National Army forces at Terenure and at Rathfarnham Barracks. Was arrested and interned until August 1923.


Arthur Shields

Arthur Shields is buried in Deansgrange
Shields Arthur. Volunteer, F Company, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 27th of April 1970 in California, aged about 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought at the GPO, Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy, Reis's Building, O'Connell Street/Lower Abbey Street, the Dublin Bread Company on Westmoreland Street and the Hibernian Bank on O'Connell Street. He joined the Volunteers about nine months before the Rising. He had just returned from a tour of England with the Abbey Players on the Easter Sunday and was mobilised on Easter Monday. He was detained after the Rising and deported first to Knutsford where he was detained for two months and detained in Frongoch for one month, he was released in August 1916. Arthur Shields was part of a group of Volunteers involved with Fergus O’Kelly in setting up the Radio in the Wireless School and Reid’s Shop. He was a well-known Abbey Actor, there is a plaque in the Abbey Theatre commemorating is part in the Rising and he also appeared in many films including The Quiet Man.

Shortis Patrick, Kimmage Garrison., Killed in Action.

 

Simpson Matilda (Tilley). Fairview Branch, Cumann na mBan, Dublin. Born in 1895, aged about 21 years old during the Rising. Served in the G.P.O. and Jervis Street Hospital. During Easter Week, she was active in the 2nd Battalion area and was mainly helping by providing first aid to Volunteers. She then helped with the collecting of funds for the dependants of Volunteers and she took an active part in the anti-conscription campaign and general elections. She was active again between the 12th of July 1921 and the 30th of June 1922, at Barry's Hotel Great Denmark Street and Moran's Hotel Gardiner Street Lower.

 

Slater Birdie (nee Walsh), Cumann na mBan, Attached to 2nd Battalion, Attached to Dublin Brigade. Born in 1891 died on the 1st of January 1960, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. Served in Beresford Place and the G.P.O. was involved prior to the Rising in preparing first aid outfits and was mobilised on Sunday, remained in the GPO until the next Friday. She was involved with elections and anti-conscription work from 1917 to the end of March 1918 and assisted in the relief of men who were released from jail. She also kept arms and documents in her house and was engaged in intelligence work, kept dispatches and documents.


 

Slattery Peadar "Sla" Science Master in The Hermitage.

 

Slevin Mrs. M.J. nee Stapleton

 

Smith Charles


Staines Michael. Born in Newport County Mayo 1885 he was the son of an R.I.C. officer. Joined the I.R.B. in 1902 served as Quartermaster General during the Rising and interned in Frongoch after the Rising. Founder member of the New Ireland Assurance Collecting Society, in furtherance of the Sinn Féin policy of investment of national resources at home in Ireland (1918). He was also elected as a Sinn Féin MP for the Dublin St. Michan's constituency at the 1918 general election. He attended Dáil Éireann, working closely with the legal side of Government, as well as becoming a Dublin alderman. He was re-elected in 1921 and 1922 for the Dublin North–West constituency. He later served in the Free State Seanad. He was the first commissioner of the Garda Síochána, having to cope with a mutiny by recruits in May 1922. He died on the 26th of October 1955.

 

Stanley Joseph (Joe). A Dundalk business man he was owner of the Boyne Cinema and a newspaper called the Drogheda Argus now incorporated into Independent Newspapers. He was 26 years old when the Rising took place and was a prominent printer and publisher of newspapers and journals for the Republican cause. He arrived in the G.P.O. on Easter Monday soon after the reading of the Proclamation and met with Connolly and Pearse to discuss the best way to inform the World of the Irish Republic. He became Press Agent for Pearse and published several War Missives. He was interned in Frongoch, he also held the sole licence for the Irish National Anthem 'Amhrán Na Bhfiann' having become a close friend of the author Peadar Kearney. He was married to Annie, (Abbey actress Eileen O'Doherty) and his 2 of his sons were named after executed 1916 leaders Colbert and Heuston Stanley and a third son was named Kevin after Kevin Barry. He died on the 2nd of June 1950 aged 60.

 

Steinmayer Charles Joseph. “A” Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1896 died on the 14th of July 1965, aged about 20 years old during the Rising. Was employed as a Clerk at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. and Moore Street areas. Was interned until December 1916. During the War of Independence Steinmayer was arrested and interned between November 1920 and December 1921. He joined the National Army (service number SDR3836) in September 1922 and served throughout the remainder of the Civil War. Charles Joseph Steinmayer resigned from the Defence Forces in January 1929.

 

Stephenson Patrick Joseph. “D” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1895 died on the 6th of April 1960, aged about 21 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the Mendicity Institute, Usher's Island, General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Four Courts, King's Inns Quay, Church Street Bridge, Irish Independent Offices, Abbey Street, and Moore Street areas. Prior to the Easter Rising he was on duty to report British troop movements at the Royal Barracks. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until August 1916. In January 1917 he joined Fianna Éireann and was involved in reorganising and in June 1917 he was appointed Adjutant General, Fianna Éireann. He was involved in clashes with RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) and DMP (Dublin Metropolitan Police), raid for arms at Ellis Quay and carried information to Mountjoy Jail in connection with an escape in March 1919. He re-joined D Company after losing his position with Fianna Éireann. There was an unsuccessful raid for arms by British forces at his work place, Thomas Street Library in November 1920. He procured 30 revolvers from British forces. Took no further part after the Truce Period.

 

Stritch Jim

 

Stynes Mrs. Ellin nee Lambert (Nellie). First Aid Squad - Attached to GPO Garrison, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1899 died on the 17th of November 1980, aged about 27 years old during the Rising. She served in the G.P.O., Royal College of Surgeons, Saint Stephen's Green, and Liberty Hall. She joined the ICA in 1913 as her father was also a member of the organisation. Her father, Tom Lambert fought with the Citizen Army in 1916 and died in 1919. Ellen Stynes followed her father and sister, Bridget Doran, nee Lambert, on Monday 24 April 1916 to Liberty Hall. She followed a group of ICA members to the GPO where she went back to on the Tuesday, until Friday 28 April. She carried dispatches for Pearse between the GPO and the College of Surgeons. She was also involved in cooking and attended the wounded. On Friday 28, she was arrested, taken into Broadstone station and was interrogated. She was released and given a pass. She spent the night with other girls in the Refuge on Henrietta Street. Following Easter Week events, she joined the Clan na Gael Girls Scouts in North Frederick Street and then, emigrated to Scotland. She returned to Ireland in 1919 and joined Cumann na mBan Dundrum branch and took part to routine activities until 1921. Her house was always used as a safe place for the Volunteers to stay. Maurice Kenny a victim of an ambush at Classon's Bridge was taken to her house. During the Truce, she continued her activities in the branch and also took messages to the Volunteers at Cabinteely and Bray barracks. She was arrested in February 1923 at Brennan's home where she was delivering a message. She was interned and released from the North Dublin Union on 28 September 1923.


Supple Patrick. (Pádraig)  Kimmage Garrison, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1897 died on the 4th of August 1945, aged about 19 years old during the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. On Friday the 28th of April 1916 he was wounded and brought to Jervis Street Hospital. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until December 1916. He joined the Liverpool Company in 1919 and was able to secure arms from a local priest that he transported arms to boats bound for Ireland. He took part in raids for passports, the burning of a farm at Chilwald. He was involved in the burning of the home of Kerr, a member of the British forces, in Harewood Street, Liverpool while he was garrisoned in Ireland. In June 1921 he was appointed Battalion Quartermaster. During the Truce Period he transported arms from Glasgow to Liverpool. Took no part in the Civil War.

 

Swan Anthony

 

Sweeney James

 

Sweeney Joseph

 

Sweeney Patrick

 

Tallon Christopher

 

Tallon James

 

Tannam Liam. Captain “E” Company 3rd Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers. Joined the Irish Volunteers in the Ancient Order of Hibernians Hall in Donnybrook Dublin in 1914 the week after the Howth gun-running. At the time he had an office in the same building as Eamon Ceannt and it was Ceannt who introduced him to the Volunteers. Eamon de Valera was Officer Commanding of the Company, at the time of the split in the Irish Volunteers the Company strength was about 130. At a meeting to determine which side members would take the split was about even. The first meeting held after the split in a field opposite Donnybrook Church only 25 mustered and this number dwindled to 7, de Valera and 7 men although de Valera continued to operate as if there was a full company ordering the 7 men to split into groups of 4. After meetings in a hall in Beaver Row and in Pearse’s old school in Oakley Road the numbers had risen to 40.

Became a member on the I.R.B. Teeling Circle in July 1915 which met in the Typographical Society premises in Lower Grafton Street Dublin, sworn in by Ceannt Éamonn. During the Rising he played a very active part in the fighting, he was in charge of the section charged with defending the ground floor windows on the right as you look out of the middle door, reinforcing the window barricades and constructing a second barricade of coal along the post office counter, in charge of relief companies for those stationed at various barricades around the G.P.O. and acquiring food and bedding from the Metropole Hotel.


Thornton Francis Joseph (Frank AKA Frank Drennan). Fought in the Liberty Hall, Beresford Place, Westmoreland Street, Telephone Exchange, Crown Alley, Imperial Hotel, O'Connell Street areas. Born in 1891, aged about 25 during the Rising. Served with the Irish Volunteers, IRA and National Forces from 1 April 1916 to 30 September 1923 through the 1916 Easter Rising, War of Independence, Truce Period and Civil War. A member of the Liverpool, England, Irish Volunteers, fought during the Easter Rising under the name of Frank Drennan and under that name was sentence to 20 years penal servitude later reduced to 10 years by British Army Court Martial following the surrender. From 1917 to 1919 Thornton was mainly engaged in an organising capacity for the Irish Volunteers working throughout the country. He was arrested in Drogheda in October 1917 but released following a hunger strike, rearrested in Dundalk in February 1918 and was deported to Reading Jail in August 1918 having been arrest immediately on his release, as part of German plot arrests. He was released in early 1919. From 1919 onwards Thornton served on the IRA General Headquarters Intelligence Staff. He joined the National Army in February 1922 serving in General Headquarters Intelligence during the Civil War until appointed Command Intelligence Officer 2 Southern Division, National Army. It was while serving in this post that Thornton was seriously wounded in an ambush by IRA forces on 21 August 1922 at Meckler's Bridge outside Clonmel, County Tipperary. Frank Thornton is variously described as having resigned from the Defence Forces and as having been discharged, medically unfit on 26 and 29 March 1924.


This group of medals were awarded to Frank Thornton who served in Imperial Hotel during the Easter Rising. He also served with the IRA GHQ staff during the Irish War of Independence and served with the 26ú Cathlan during the Emergency period.

The medals are mounted on a single pin bar and were privately named by Frank Thornton. The 1916 medal is engraved Frank Thornton Cpt. Imperial Hotel Garrison. The 1917-1921 Service Medal is engraved Frank Thornton GHQ Staff IRA 1916-1921.



 

Thornton Hugh, Kimmage Garrison. Irish Volunteers, Liverpool Company, Kimmage Garrison. He was killed in action by the IRA while serving with the National Army during the Civil War on 27 August 1922 in Clonakilty, County Cork.  Along with his brothers Frank and Patrick and sister Nora he travelled to Dublin from Liverpool, England to participate in the 1916 Easter Rising.  Hugh Thornton resisted attempts by British Military Authorities to conscript him while he was interned at Frongoch, served as Vice Commandant of the West Cork Brigade of the Irish Volunteers in 1919 and later as Battalion Intelligence Officer, 2 Battalion, Dublin Brigade, IRA during the War of Independence.

 

Thornton Patrick, Kimmage Garrison.

 

Tobin Annie (Mrs. Soalfield)

 

Toomey Joseph

 

Toomey Stasia (Mrs. S. Byrne). Fairview Branch Attached to 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1891 died on the 8th of April 1966, aged about 25 years old during the Rising. After her activities during Easter Week, mostly first aid and making cartridges, she was appointed Secretary of the Fairview Branch and was also active on the working of the National Aid and Dependents Fund. She resigned from her position of Secretary in 1919 but remained involved in all Cumann na mBan activities up to the Truce. Her house, then 88 Phibsboro Road, was used to assist men on the run, to hide arms and ammunition. Dan Breen was also brought there following the Ashtown ambush. At that time she also worked for Hugh Thornton Intelligence Officer, 2nd Battalion, Dublin Brigade, mainly carrying despatches.


Traynor Oscar

 

Treston Cathleen

 

Trimble Joseph. Died in 1956, imprisoned in Richmond Barracks and Lewes Prison UK after the Rising. Fought in the War of Independence and was part of the Four Courts Garrison in the Civil War.


Tully George. Irish Citizen Army. Born 1899 died on the 14th of February 1985, aged about 17 years old during the Rising. Carried dispatches between Jacobs Biscuit Factory, Imperial Hotel and G.P.O. He was arrested on the Wednesday of the Rising taken to the Custom House then to Richmond Barracks then transferred to Wakefield and interned for six weeks. He re-joined the Irish Volunteers upon reorganisation and took part in an armed guard at St Enda's, Peter's Place and the Mansion House. He fired a number of shots at members of the R.I.C. during the attempted arrest of Captain O'Shea of the Irish Citizen Army. During the War of Independence he took part in raids for Belfast goods. He assisted in circulating copies of an t-Óglach and he organised a Company of the Irish Citizen Army in Gort, County Galway. During the Truce Period (12 July 1921 - 30 June 1922) he attended training camps. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was sent to Barry's Hotel and Hammam Hotel and was involved in the attempted blowing up of a bridge at Raheny.


Tuohy Dr. J.J.

 

Tuohy Patrick Colman. Private, Irish Citizen Army. Born in 1861 died on the 31st of December 1939, aged about 55 years old during the Rising. Fought at Delahunty's Public House, the G.P.O., Imperial Hotel and Buckingham Street. During the Rising he was part of a group of thirteen that occupied Delahunty's on Easter Monday, they remained there until the next morning when they were ordered to go to the G.P.O. On the Tuesday he was ordered to the Imperial Hotel and on the Thursday night while evacuating this building he was captured on Buckingham Street. He was deported and detained in Stafford Jail until the 1st of August 1916 when he was released with 168 other prisoners. He remained with the Citizen Army throughout the War of independence but did not take part in any actions against Crown Forces. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was engaged in fighting with the National Army at Moran’s Hotel for one day. He took no further part in the Civil War.


 

Turner Cormac. Part of a small garrison of 5 men who occupied the premises of Hopkins and Hopkins a silversmith on the corner of O’Connell Street and the Quays makers of the Sam Maguire Cup.

 

Turner Francis . “G” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born 10th of June 1898 died 23rd of March 1953, aged about 17 at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O. He sustained a head wound while in the General Post Office and was attended by a British Army  medical officer who was been held prisoner. Following the Easter Rising he was interned until September or October 1916. He spent time in England seeking employment before returning to Dublin. Turner enlisted in the National Forces on 29 July 1922 and was discharged from the Defence Forces on 21 February 1924 from Beggars Bush Barracks at the rank of private. His father Joseph Turner senior also fought in the Rising.


 

Turner Joseph (senior). Section Commander, “G” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born 1861 died 1st of October 1945, aged about 57 years old at the time of the Rising, joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913. Took part in the fighting in the General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Mary Street, Liffey Street, Metropole Hotel, O'Connell Street, Office of The Freeman's Journal, North Princes Street, and the Coliseum Variety Theatre, O'Connell Street. No records of involvement in the War of Independence apart from taking part in the Armagh Election Campaign in which he claims he was armed (under orders).

 

Twamley John Joseph. Lieutenant, “A” Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born on the 2nd of October 1889 died on the 21st of May 1965, aged about 26 years old during the Rising. He was employed as a telephone linesman stationed at Bray County Wicklow. He was in Liberty Hall on Easter Monday morning and was told by James Connolly to put into action plans to sever communications. After cutting overhead and underground lines he felled poles along the railway line in order to disrupt the trains. He returned to the G.P.O. where he was involved in the fighting throughout the week. On the Tuesday of the Rising he was in charge of a party of Volunteers which built barricades across the road at Wynn’s Hotel and was also involved in the retreat to Moore Lane. He was interned in Stafford Jail until December 1916. He was involved in the War of Independence.

 

Tyrrell Timothy. Volunteer, Maynooth Company, Kildare Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Born in 1887 died on the 8th of November 1970, aged about 29 years old at the time of the Rising. He joined the Volunteers in 1914. With fifteen others of the Maynooth Company he marched to Dublin leaving Maynooth on the Monday evening and arriving in Dublin at the G.P.O. about 6.30am on the Tuesday. He was deported after the surrender first to Stafford Jail then Frongoch, he was released on the 24th of December 1916. He resumed activities with the Maynooth Company on release and served throughout the War of Independence. He took the Anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was captured in December 1922 and detained in Mountjoy, Kilmainham and Hare Park, he was released about May or June 1924.

 

Ui Faoithe, Brigid Bean

 

Ui Glasam, Veronica (nee Ni Riain)

 

Wade Michael

 

Walker Charles. Printer of Irish War News during the Rising. Under the instructions of James Connolly the premises of James O’Keeffe’s Printing Plant in Halston Street was taken over. Mr. Stanley checked and read the proofs, Matthew J Walker ( Charles Walker’s father ) Thomas Ryan and James O’Sullivan set up the type and Charles Walker did the printing. Mr. Stanley delivered the printed papers to the G.P.O. and also collected the items to be printed. All four men continued their printing duties until the surrender on the Sunday.



Walker Matthew J. Assisted his son Charles Walker (see above) in printing The Irish War News.

 

Walpole Robert Henry. He was 21 years old at the time of the Rising and was born in Dublin. He is recorded on the 1911 census as speaking Irish and English. On Easter Monday, soon after the G.P.O. was occupied Walpole was given the task of putting up the Irish Republic flag on the roof of the building. He was given the instruction by James Connolly who handed him the flag wrapped in a parcel. With Sean Hegarty he went to the Princes Street end of the G.P.O., they both hoisted the flag which flew all week. The flag was made of Green Poplin with Irish Republic in white and orange letters and had a gold border. The flag was made in Fry’s Poplin Factory, Cork Street, Dublin and the words Irish Republic painted on to it by Theobald Fitzgerald in the home of Countess Markievicz Surrey House, Leinster Road, Rathmines. The flag was captured by the Royal Irish Regiment and hung upside down in their mess hall for many years. The flag was returned to Ireland in 1966 and is now in the National Museum.




Many pot-shots were taken at the flag by the British and eventually the flag pole was broken just above the level of the G.P.O. parapet causing the flag to fly over O’Connell Street. The flag pole can be seen in the image above.

Walsh Christopher.  Private, Hibernian Rifles. Born on the 13th of June 1895 died on the 22nd of November 1947, aged 20 years old at the time of the Rising. Fought in the G.P.O., Dublin Castle and Parliament Street. He was not arrested or detained after the Rising. He remained with the Hibernian Rifles until 1918 then joined G Company, IRA serving throughout the War of Independence. He joined the National Army at Beggars Bush on the 26th of May 1922 and was discharged time expired on the 9th of October 1923 army service number 8465.

 

Walsh Edward, Killed in Action.

 

Walsh, James Joseph

 

Walsh Mark

 

Wardock James

 

Weafer Patrick

 

Weafer Thomas, Killed in Action.

 

Wheatley Thomas

 

Whelan Joseph

 

White John J.

 

White Michael.

 

Willis Henry.

 

Wisely Esther. (Mrs. O’Moore, Wiseley). Attached to 2 Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Cumann na mBan. Born in 1890 died the 26th of February 1963, aged about 26 years old during the Rising, her husband Sean O’Moore fought at the Four Courts.



Image John O’Grady.

Wren James. Not a member of any organization. Born in 1898 died on the 30 of December 1953, aged about 18 years old at the time of the Rising. James Wren was not a member of the any organisation prior to the Easter Rising but volunteered on Monday 24 April 1916 following the takeover of the G.P.O. However due to ill health he only served for one day. During the War of Independence he assisted in the transportation of arms.